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All Posts Tagged as 'Science'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Google fires Margaret Mitchell, another top researcher on its AI ethics team 

 

Google has fired one of its top artificial intelligence researchers, Margaret Mitchell, escalating internal turmoil at the company following the departure of Timnit Gebru, another leading figure on Google’s AI ethics team.

In a statement to Reuters, Google said the firing followed a weeks-long investigation that found she moved electronic files outside the company. Google said Mitchell violated the company’s code of conduct and security policies.

Gebru said Google fired her after she questioned an order not to publish a paper claiming AI that mimics language could hurt marginalized populations.

Google fires Margaret Mitchell, another top researcher on its AI ethics team

Tags: Activism, Business, Employment, Leaders, Men In Charge, Science, Termination

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

19-Feb-2021


Machines can do most of a psychologist’s job. The industry must prepare for disruption 

 

Psychology and other “helping professions” such as counselling and social work are often regarded as quintessentially human domains. Unlike workers in manual or routine jobs, psychologists generally see no threat to their career from advances in machine learning and artificial intelligence.

Economists largely agree. One of the most wide-ranging and influential surveys of the future of employment, by Oxford economists Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne, rated the probability that psychology could be automated in the near future at a mere 0.43%. This work was initially carried out in 2013 and expanded upon in 2019.

We are behavourial scientists studying organisational behaviour, and one of us (Ben Morrison) is also a registered psychologist. Our analysis over the past four years shows the idea psychology cannot be automated is now out of date.

Psychology already makes use of many automated tools, and even without significant advances in AI we foresee significant impacts in the very near future.

Machines can do most of a psychologist’s job. The industry must prepare for disruption

Tags: AI, Discovery, Future, Mental Health, Robot, Science, Substitute, Tech, Treatment

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

15-Feb-2021


THE TRUTH ABOUT WHAT YOUR DOG'S BARK REALLY MEANS 

 

DOES YOUR DOG BARK A LOT? Or is he one of those quiet pooches who barks only when things get really exciting? Most dogs bark at least a little.

Dog barks are not words. But although your dog will never tell you about his parents or the weather or the amazing bone he had yesterday, his barks still communicate important information.

Your dog’s barks may not be words, but he probably barks a little differently depending on what kind of thing has got him excited. If you listen closely, you may find you can tell the difference between a bark directed toward a package deliverer and one directed toward a friend at the door. The bark to a passing dog may be different than the bark at a passing car.

THE TRUTH ABOUT WHAT YOUR DOG'S BARK REALLY MEANS

Tags: Animals, Environment, Evolution, History, Performance, Pets, Science, Study, Talk

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

15-Feb-2021


Is it safe to visit grandparents after getting the Covid vaccine? 

 

Dr. Anthony Fauci, one of the nation's leading public health advisers, told Savannah Guthrie on NBC's "TODAY" show that he is often asked if it's safe to get together without some of the public health measures like masking and social distancing.

“The answer, ultimately, is going to be yes,” he said during the interview Thursday.

However, that's if everyone in the group is fully vaccinated. Fauci urged more caution if only one party has received the vaccine, since people who have been vaccinated could potentially harbor virus in their nose and transmit it to others.

“That's the reason why we say, until we have the overwhelming majority of people vaccinated, and the level of virus is very low, if you're vaccinated, it would be prudent to wear a mask,” Fauci said.

Is it safe to visit grandparents after getting the Covid vaccine?

Tags: Choices, Coronavirus, Effect, Family, Masks, Responsibility, Safety, Science, Social Distancing, Vaccine

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

14-Feb-2021


China's new anal swabs might be the most accurate coronavirus test yet 

 

In the latest defense against the still-rampant pandemic, China is using anal swabs as a way to test for COVID-19 infections. China’s state television network (CCTV) announced last week that health officials would be swabbing passengers arriving in Beijing, residents of quarantine centers, and other high risk populations, Forbes reported. Some folks are outraged at this “invasive” procedure, but what if anal swabs are more effective at detecting COVID-19?

Actually, they might be. A study from July, published in Future Microbiology, suggested that not only can anal swabs detect some COVID-19 infections that throat and nose tests miss, but that rectal testing can also detect the virus 4-5 longer after symptoms disappear in patients with COVID-19, according to Forbes. That’s because even though COVID-19 is primarily a respiratory infection, the virus sticks around longer in the gastrointestinal tract.

China's new anal swabs might be the most accurate coronavirus test yet

Tags: Coronavirus, Science, Test

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

27-Jan-2021


Enhancing brain function with butter 

 

The key to having healthy brain function is to give your brain an optimal energy supply. Most would argue that the brain needs glucose as its optimal energy source but what we are finding is that only a small portion of your brain needs sugar. What the brain actually prefers are ketones from fat as its energy source.

For those of you wanting to optimize your brain performance, not to mention decrease inflammation in your gut and heart, it is necessary to eat more fat from butter.

Butter is now considered by many to be the new superfood, even though it has been used for at least 4,500 years. How did we get so far removed from fat? One of the early campaigns against fat began when Dwight Eisenhower was diagnosed with heart disease in 1955. His team of scientists and doctors, including the snit-fat crusader, Ancel Keys concluded that saturated fat and butter caused his chronic disease.

Enhancing brain function with butter

Tags: Brain, Food, Health, Science

Filed under: Health/Food

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26-Jan-2021


Why swearing is a sign of intelligence, helps manage pain and more 

 

Polite society considers swearing to be a vulgar sign of low intelligence and education, for why would one rely on rude language when blessed with a rich vocabulary?

That perception, as it turns out, is full of, uh ... baloney. In fact, swearing may be a sign of verbal superiority, studies have shown, and may provide other possible rewards as well.

"The advantages of swearing are many," said Timothy Jay, professor emeritus of psychology at the Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, who has studied swearing for more than 40 years.

"The benefits of swearing have just emerged in the last two decades, as a result of a lot of research on brain and emotion, along with much better technology to study brain anatomy," Jay said.

Why swearing is a sign of intelligence, helps manage pain and more

Tags: Brain, Intelligence, Science, Study

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

26-Jan-2021


Here’s why COVID-19 has a vaccine after 1 year and HIV doesn’t after nearly 40 years 

 

The rapid development of several COVID-19 vaccines has compelled numerous web commenters to accusingly ask why the same hasn’t been done for HIV, a pandemic that has lasted nearly 40 years longer than the coronavirus.

However, a closer look at the different virology of coronavirus and HIV helps explain why the former has a soon-to-be widely available vaccine and the latter doesn’t.

The aforementioned critics often claim that the lack of an HIV vaccine is due to the fact that HIV has most affected men and trans women who have sex with men, Black people, people of color, and intravenous drug users — marginalized people who tend to have less money and political power. Thus, the lack of an HIV vaccine can seem like a conspiratorial way to let these communities die off.

Here’s why COVID-19 has a vaccine after 1 year and HIV doesn’t after nearly 40 years

Tags: Coronavirus, Cultural, Death, Disease, Environment, Exclusivity, Gay, Health, Inclusion, Insensitivity, LGBTQ, Lifestyle, Representation, Science, Vaccine

Filed under: Gay+

Permalink

29-Dec-2020


Still Disinfecting Surfaces? It Might Not Be Worth It 

 

At the start of the pandemic, stores quickly sold out of disinfectant sprays and wipes. People were advised to wipe down their packages and the cans they bought at the grocery store.

But scientists have learned a lot this year about the coronavirus and how it's transmitted, and it turns out all that scrubbing and disinfecting might not be necessary.

If a person infected with the coronavirus sneezes, coughs or talks loudly, droplets containing particles of the virus can travel through the air and eventually land on nearby surfaces. But the risk of getting infected from touching a surface contaminated by the virus is low, says Emanuel Goldman, a microbiologist at Rutgers University.

In retrospect, Marr says that was "overkill." Today, she says, "all the evidence points toward breathing in the virus from the air as being the most important route of transmission."

Scientists now know that the early surface studies were done in pristine lab conditions using much larger amounts of virus than would be found in a real-life scenario.

Even so, many of us continue to attack door handles, packages and groceries with disinfectant wipes, and workers across the U.S. spend hours disinfecting surfaces in public areas like airports, buildings and subways.

There's no scientific data to justify this, says Dr. Kevin Fennelly, a respiratory infection specialist with the National Institutes of Health.

Still Disinfecting Surfaces? It Might Not Be Worth It

Tags: Choices, Clean, Coronavirus, Environment, Overreaction, Science, Study

Filed under: Health/Food

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29-Dec-2020


Deadly 'Brain-Eating' Amoeba Slowly But Surely Expanding Its Footprint in The US 

 

Deadly "brain-eating amoeba" infections have historically occurred in the Southern United States. But cases have been appearing farther north in recent years, likely because of climate change, a new study finds.

The study researchers, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), examined cases of this brain-eating amoeba, known as Naegleria fowleri, over a four-decade period in the US.

They found that, although the number of cases that occur each year has remained about the same, the geographic range of these cases has been shifting northward, with more cases popping up in Midwestern states than before.

Deadly 'Brain-Eating' Amoeba Slowly But Surely Expanding Its Footprint in The US

Tags: Brain, Contamination, Death, Environment, Evolution, Exclusivity, Nature, Retribution, Science, Study, Survival, Terraforming

Filed under: Health/Food

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17-Dec-2020


Jeff Bezos: Blue Origin space company will take first woman to the moon 

 

Jeff Bezos’ space company Blue Origin will take the first woman to the moon, the billionaire said as Nasa nears a decision over who will supply its first privately built lunar landers, meant to be capable of sending astronauts to the moon by 2024.

“This is the engine that will take the first woman to the surface of the moon,” Bezos said in a post on Instagram with a video of a BE-7 engine test this week at Nasa Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

Twelve men have walked on the Moon, but no women. Nasa aims to change that, administrator Jim Bridenstine saying last year the first woman to complete a lunar landing will be drawn from the current astronaut corps.

“In the 1960s, young ladies didn’t have the opportunity to see themselves in that role,” Bridenstine said. “Today they do, and I think this is a very exciting opportunity.”

Jeff Bezos: Blue Origin space company will take first woman to the moon

Tags: All Rights, Astronaut, Employment, Equality, Investment, Opportunity, Science, Space, Woman's Rights

Filed under: Health/Food

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05-Dec-2020


New technique proves capable of reversing age-related vision loss 

 

Scientists have made some great advancements in the field of age-related illnesses, but actually turning back time on the DNA of a living creature remains an elusive holy grail. We know that DNA gradually breaks down as a person grows older. We see that damage as aging and various age-related illnesses tend to pop up the older a person gets and the more their genes degrade.

Now, researchers from Harvard Medical School appear to have made a big leap in reversing aging in mice. More specifically, the researchers managed to revitalize the vision of aging mice by giving them a boost using genes that are present during early development.

New technique proves capable of reversing age-related vision loss

Tags: Aging, Discovery, Eye, Science, Study, Treatment

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

04-Dec-2020


Here’s the real story behind Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘The Birds’ 

 

In the Santa Cruz Sentinel, August 18, 1961, there is an account of thousands of birds raining down from the sky at 3 a.m.—crashing into homes and cars in Capitola and Pleasure Point, California just off Monterey Bay. Eight persons were reported bitten. This is the bird: Ardenna grisea, the sooty shearwater.

“The word of the bird invasion spread fast throughout the state,” notes the article, “and a phone call came to The Sentinel from mystery thriller producer Alfred Hitchcock from Hollywood.” He requested a copy of that day’s paper. After all, the famed director was adapting a particular 1952 Daphne du Maurier story into a screenplay on the subject of killer birds. And less than two years later, Hitchcock’s The Birds premiered.

Prevailing theories at the time supposed the sooty shearwaters got lost in the fog. But if flocking birds were easily confused in low visibility, which is pretty normal up and down coastal California, then shearwater invasions would be as common as passing rain. So, in order to understand what happened, first you need to know how a flock of birds—like thousands of shearwaters—fly and move together.

Here’s the real story behind Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘The Birds’

Tags: Animals, Environment, Film, Film Trivia, Health, Lifestyle, Nature, Science, Study, World

Filed under: Gay+

Permalink

03-Dec-2020


Dog owners may catch COVID-19 more often, but the reason will surprise you 

 

You probably already know the ins-and-outs of how to protect yourself from COVID-19 when it comes to dealing with other human beings. If you do have to be around people, don’t get too close, wear a mask, and try to stay outside. But, having a friendly dog can make those interactions tricker. After all, many dog owners have been dragged across the street to meet a new fuzzy friend and their owner, whether they like it or not.

One study recently published in Environmental Research found that pet owners who take their dogs on walks have a 78 percent higher chance of catching COVID-19 compared to pup-less peers in a survey of over 2000 people. That’s higher than even that of people still going onsite to work.

Dog owners may catch COVID-19 more often, but the reason will surprise you

Tags: Animals, Awareness, Contagion, Environment, Etiquette, Health, Lifestyle, Nature, Neighbor, Safety, Science, Study

Filed under: Health/Food

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03-Dec-2020


Is shopping in stores safe during the pandemic? 

 

Is shopping in stores safe during the pandemic?

There are ways to reduce risk, but health experts advise avoiding it when possible.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says holiday shopping in crowded stores is a “higher risk” activity and that people should limit any in-person shopping, including at supermarkets.

Is shopping in stores safe during the pandemic?

Tags: Contagion, Coronavirus, Safety, Science, Shopping

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

01-Dec-2020




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