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All Posts Tagged as 'Science'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Ellen and Science Confirm: Rich People Only Care About Themselves 

 

Surprised that Ellen DeGeneres was seen yukking it up with George W. Bush at a football game last weekend? Don’t be! Rich people love hanging out with other rich people. So, since Ellen’s a multimillionaire, the 43rd President of the United States is a multimillionaire, and Charlotte Jones Anderson—the Dallas Cowboys’ Executive Vice President who invited both of them to Sunday’s game—is a multimillionaire, it actually all makes perfect sense that they’d all want to socialize together.

Still, it is confusing to think about how DeGeneres, one of the nation’s foremost openly gay celebrities would, could look past Bush’s years of using the bully pulpit to advocate against LGBTQ rights—not to mention, uhhhh, the unnecessary wars he started in Iraq and Afghanistan, which have killed millions of people and traumatized countless others.

Ellen tried to explain away the cognitive dissonance of all this on her talk show Monday morning, saying that “just because I don’t agree with someone on everything doesn’t mean that I’m not going to be friends with them.” But disagreeing about the Bush administration’s ongoing legacy of global violence against Muslim people seems like more than just a difference of opinion.

Does Ellen not understand why people are disgusted by that video of her and W. palling around at the football game? Does she just not care?

(Paul continues on with the observation that "the love of money is the root of all evil." 1 Timothy 6:10 Miller emphasizes that "it is the love of money that is the obstacle to faith, not the money itself." Jesus looked around and said to his disciples, "How hard it is for the rich to enter the kingdom of God!")

Vice

Are the rich more selfish than the rest of us?

BEING RICH MAKES YOU MORE SELFISH, FINDS STUDY

Tags: Americans, Celebrity, Exclusivity, Hypocrisy, Mental Health, Nature, No more Heroes, Privilege, Psychology, Science

Filed under: Gay+

Permalink

13-Oct-2019


Identity 

 

Much of the research examining identity has focused on traits or dynamics that are considered universal for all human beings (e.g., self-esteem, introversion-extraversion, and levels of anxiety) regardless of race, culture, gender, sexual orientation, or class. At this level, researchers and clinicians treat human experiences as being similar, for example, the experiences of aging, coping with life stress, and interpersonal relationships. However, the extent to which any one of these traits and dynamics may be high or low, prominent, amplified, or muted differs as a result of sociodemographic categories such as culture, class, gender, ethnicity, or sexual orientation.

Psychology

Identity, Self-Esteem and Self-Compassion

Tags: Brain, Discovery, Identity, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Psychology, Science, Social Media, Society, World

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

05-Oct-2019


Will There Ever Be a Cure for Addiction? 

 

From drinking hand-sanitizing gels to using synthetic marijuana, our society is constantly inventing new ways to get high. When one substance is banned, another quickly takes its place. What drives this never-ending hunt for the next high?

One important motivator is the pleasure principle. The quest for pleasure is a fundamental part of being human. It helps us meet our basic needs by pushing us to work towards specific goals.

Drugs provide an instant shortcut to our brain’s pleasure center. They flood our brains with dopamine and condition us to seek the next high. As a result, our bodies begin reducing their natural dopamine output. With repeated drug use, pleasure dissipates but the cravings remain. Thus, drugs hijack our natural drive for pleasure. Addicts pursue drugs despite the fact that the pleasure they experience from them progressively diminishes.

Psychology Today

Tags: Addiction, Alcohol, Disease, Drugs, Environment, Health, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Psychology, Science, Treatment

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

16-Sep-2019


Humans Can Reverse Their Biological Age, Shows a 'Curious Case' Study 

 

In a small, 1-year clinical trial published Thursday in the journal Aging Cell, nine participants took three common medications — growth hormone and two diabetes drugs — and reversed their biological age by 2-and-a-half years on average. Greg Fahy, Ph.D., lead author of the study and chief science officer of anti-aging therapeutics company Intervene Immune, tells Inverse that this research proves the concept that biological aging may not be unstoppable.

“One of the lessons that we can draw from the study is that aging is not necessarily something that is beyond our control,” he says. “In fact it seems that aging is largely controlled by biological processes that we may be able to influence.”

Inverse

Tags: Aging, Drugs, Health, Medical, Options, Science, Study, Treatment

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

08-Sep-2019


New study finds vegetarianism and veganism could lead to higher risk of stroke 

 

If you were considering swearing off meat for health reasons, maybe don't throw away that bacon cheeseburger just yet. At least not if all that you're trying to prevent is a stroke. A report by researchers at Oxford published in the British Medical Journal found that out of nearly 50,000 people studied, vegetarians and vegans had a 20 percent higher rate of stroke than meat eaters.

The Blaze

Tags: Development, Diet, Disease, Food, Health, Science, Statistics, Study

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

08-Sep-2019


MONSTER HYBRID TUMBLEWEED SPECIES IS TAKING OVER CALIFORNIA, SCIENTISTS WARN 

 

A new invasive species of tumbleweed that can grow up to six feet in height is taking over parts of California—and scientists are warning it could spread even further as climate change makes its growing conditions more favorable.

Salsola ryanii was first identified in California in 2002. It is a hybrid made up of two other invasive species—Salsola tragus, which is native to Russia and China, and Salsola australis, from Australia and South Africa. The latter, scientists say, is "one of the world's worst weeds" and is currently found in 48 U.S. states. The new species, is however, far bigger and faster growing than its parents, reaching about six feet in height.

A tumbleweed is a plant that breaks away from its roots towards the end of summer. It is blown around by the wind—its means of seed dispersal. In doing this, tumbleweeds cause huge problems. They can lead to traffic accidents and damage property. Invasive species also cause problems for the agriculture industry and native ecosystems.

Newsweek

Tags: Environment, Pests, Plants, Science, Terraforming

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

27-Aug-2019


Cyborgs will replace humans and remake the world, James Lovelock says 

 

For tens of thousands of years, humans have reigned as our planet's only intelligent, self-aware species. But the rise of intelligent machines means that could change soon, perhaps in our own lifetimes. Not long after that, Homo sapiens could vanish from Earth entirely.

That’s the jarring message of a new book by James Lovelock, the famed British environmentalist and futurist. “Our supremacy as the prime understanders of the cosmos is rapidly coming to end,” he says in the book, "Novacene." “The understanders of the future will not be humans but what I choose to call ‘cyborgs’ that will have designed and built themselves.”

NBC News

Tags: All Rights, Books, Environment, Future, Humanity, Intelligence, Nature, Population, Science, Writing

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

26-Aug-2019


Tree-planting projects may not be so green 

 

Brides and grooms do it. Transatlantic travellers do it. And you might even be getting it for Christmas. Neutralising your carbon emissions is becoming the must-do activity for the eco-conscious citizen. But now an international team of scientists has raised an unexpected objection: some tree-planting projects may, they suggest, be doing more harm than good.

Carbon offsetting allows people to pay someone else to atone for their climate sins by soaking up the CO2 that they produce. And with the consequences of global warming becoming more apparent, more Britons are opting to undo their personal share of the damage.

Last year companies and individuals in the UK spent around £4m offsetting carbon emissions. The Kyoto protocol allows member countries to do the same through carbon trading.

But it seems the guilt-free option is not as simple as writing a cheque and leaving it to someone else to sort out. Researchers have found that planting trees to soak up carbon can have detrimental knock on effects. "I believe we haven't thought through the consequences of this," says team-member Robert Jackson at Duke University in North Carolina, "I think the policy could backfire on us, but it will take decades to play out."

The Guardian

Tags: Environment, Health, Science, Terraforming

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

24-Aug-2019


 

We spend the entire present disproving the sustainability of the previous generation and replacing it with new discoveries that a future nation will disprove. 19-Aug-2019

Tags: History, Science, World

Filed under: Wisps

Permalink

19-Aug-2019


Study shows social media may harm teens' mental health 

 

CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta explains the details of a new study linking social media use to mental health issues in teens.

CNN

How Does Social Media Affect Girls? They Feel Effects More Strongly Than Boys, New Research Says

we need to stop making mental illness look cool on social media

Tags: Children, Effect, Environment, Mental Health, Parental Burden, Parental Crime, Safety, Science, Social Media, Study, Threat, Treatment, Video, Youth

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

15-Aug-2019


The bald facts about diet: to avoid hair loss, you need meat 

 

"Eating a healthy, balanced diet and avoiding excessive stress, extreme diets and fast weight loss are vital in maintaining healthy hair growth," says Lisa Caddy, a certified trichologist with Philip Kingsley, a leading authority in hair and scalp health from London.

The irony: what many people think of as a healthy diet - that is, mainly consisting of fruit and vegetables, with minimal protein and calories - often doesn't include all the elements needed for optimum hair growth, Caddy says.

To function at their best, the cells in the hair and throughout the body need a balance of proteins, complex carbohydrates, iron, vitamins and minerals.

Meats, especially red meats, are particularly important because they're the richest sources of ferritin, a stored iron that helps the body produce hair cell protein.

SCMP

Tags: Diet, Effect, Health, Medical, Science, Treatment

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

13-Aug-2019


Here's what happens to your body when you cut out dairy 

 

Making any change to your diet, whether large or small, can be nerve-wracking. When your body has become so accustomed to consuming and digesting a product, it can be concerning to completely eliminate it. One product that more and more people seem to be cutting out is dairy.

Whether you want to cut out dairy for ethical reasons, because consuming it doesn't make your body feel great anymore, or because you've seen it have a positive impact on others — such as with celebrity Khloe Kardashian who credits the elimination of dairy for part of her weight loss— this could be a great choice for you. There's a lot you need to consider, however, before you make the leap, including how your body could react.

Here's what could happen to your body if you cut our dairy.

Business Insider

Tags: Dairy, Diet, Effect, Safety, Science, Weight

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

13-Aug-2019


Gay men more likely to cheat than straight men, say psychologists 

 

"In the gay life, fidelity is almost impossible. Since part of the compulsion of homosexuality seems to be a need on the part of the homophile to “absorb” masculinity from his sexual partners, he must be constantly on the lookout for [new partners]. Constantly the most successful homophile “marriages” are those where there is an agreement between the two to have affairs on the side while maintaining the semblance of permanence in their living arrangement. [p. 208]"

Gay life is most typical and works best when sexual contacts are impersonal and even anonymous. As a group the homosexuals I have known seem far more preoccupied with sex than heterosexuals are, and far more likely to think of a good sex life as many partners under many exciting circumstances. [p.209]"

Tremr

Tags: Environment, Gay, History, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Nature, Preference, Psychology, Relationships, Representation, Science, Study, Treatment

Filed under: Gay+

Permalink

11-Aug-2019


Why Drinking Water All Day Long Is Not the Best Way to Stay Hydrated 

 

Water is cheap and healthy. And drinking H2O is an effective way for most people to stay hydrated. The National Academy of Medicine recommends that adult women and men drink at least 91 and 125 ounces of water a day, respectively. (For context, one gallon is 128 fluid ounces.) But pounding large quantities of water morning, noon and night may not be the best or most efficient way to meet the body’s hydration requirements.

“If you’re drinking water and then, within two hours, your urine output is really high and [your urine] is clear, that means the water is not staying in well,” says David Nieman, a professor of public health at Appalachian State University and director of the Human Performance Lab at the North Carolina Research Campus. Nieman says plain water has a tendency to slip right through the human digestive system when not accompanied by food or nutrients. This is especially true when people drink large volumes of water on an empty stomach. “There’s no virtue to that kind of consumption,” he says.

Time

Tags: Awareness, Food, Health, Hydration, Perception, Science, Water

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

09-Aug-2019


First human-monkey chimera raises concern among scientists 
 

Efforts to create human-animal chimeras have rebooted an ethical debate after reports emerged that scientists have produced monkey embryos containing human cells.

A chimera is an organism whose cells come from two or more “individuals”, with recent work looking at combinations from different species. The word comes from a beast from Greek mythology which was said to be part lion, part goat and part snake.

The latest report, published in the Spanish newspaper El País, claims a team of researchers led by Prof Juan Carlos Izpisúa Belmonte from the Salk Institute in the US have produced monkey-human chimeras. The research was conducted in China “to avoid legal issues”, according to the report.

Chimeras are seen as a potential way to address the lack of organs for transplantation, as well as problems of organ rejection. Scientists believe organs genetically matched to a particular human recipient could one day be grown inside animals. The approach is based on taking cells from an adult human and reprogramming them to become stem cells, which can give rise to any type of cell in the body. They are then introduced into the embryo of another species.

The Guardian

Tags: Animals, DNA, Environment, Experimentation, Fear, Interference, Organs, Responsibility, Safety, Science, Study, Terraforming, Treatment

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

03-Aug-2019




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