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All Posts Tagged as 'Science'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Dog walking increases odds of catching COVID by 78 percent, here's why 

 

A group of researchers in Spain have been looking at how different regular activities affect your chances of catching the coronavirus, and there is some bad news: Walking the dog increases your odds of catching COVID by 78 percent.

Dog walking increases odds of catching COVID by 78 percent, here's why

Dog owners can enjoy perks and gifts all weekend long for ‘Packed Weekend’ in New York City

Tags: Animals, Celebration, Choices, Contagion, Coronavirus, Environment, Pets, Responsibility, Safety, Science, Social Distancing, Statistics, Study, Threat, Weird

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

19-Nov-2020


‘Covid-hell.’ ‘Humanitarian disaster.’ Experts sound the alarm about U.S. coronavirus outbreak. 

 

Public health experts are sounding the alarm about the trajectory of the pandemic in the United States as the coronavirus spreads through the country largely unabated and officials muse aloud about the possibility of fresh lockdowns.

“Our hospitals are full,” Megan Ranney, an emergency medicine professor at Brown University, said in an interview. “Our workers are getting sick. And it is simply overwhelming the system.”

The rapid rise in hospitalizations could foreshadow a long period of rising deaths, said Scott Gottlieb, former director of the Food and Drug Administration. Although improvements in care have pushed the mortality rate below 1 percent in the United States, 1,549 people died of the virus Wednesday, the highest toll since April.

Frieden tweeted that the United States has entered “the exponential phase” of virus spread and that the situation will worsen significantly before it improves. But he emphasized that policy decisions have an impact, and throwing in the towel is the wrong solution.

“If people on the whole just go to the store one less time a week, you could substantially reduce spread,” Gottlieb said on “Squawk Box.”

The holiday season, meanwhile, is a looming danger that Ranney expects will lead to a “deadly” spike in infections. The virus’s prevalence across the country means that this is the worst time for people to increase their risk of transmission by attending family-centric celebrations, she said.

‘Covid-hell.’ ‘Humanitarian disaster.’ Experts sound the alarm about U.S. coronavirus outbreak.

California becomes second state in US to surpass 1m Covid-19 cases

Dr. Birx advises no extended family gatherings in Utah for Thanksgiving, Christmas

Orange County at risk of reverting to most restrictive purple tier as COVID-19 infection rates rise

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot tells city to stay at home for 30 days, cancel Thanksgiving plans and puts 10-person limit on gatherings due to COVID-19 spike - days after she joined crowds celebrating Biden's win

Tags: Cancelled, Celebration, Coronavirus, Environment, Etiquette, Family, Health, Holidays, Investment, Masks, Quarantine, Responsibility, Safety, Saving The Environment!, Science, Self Interest, Social Distancing, Surge, Survival, Threat, Travel, Unity, Warning

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

13-Nov-2020


'Past a point of no return': Reducing greenhouse gas emissions to zero still won't stop global warming, study says 

 

Even if human-caused greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced to zero, global temperatures may continue to rise for centuries afterward, according to a scientific study published Thursday.

"The world is already past a point of no return for global warming," the study authors report in the British journal Scientific Reports. The only way to stop the warming, they say, is that "enormous amounts of carbon dioxide have to be extracted from the atmosphere."

The burning of fossil fuels such as oil, coal and gas release greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere, causing global temperatures to increase and sea levels to rise.

The scientists modeled the effect of greenhouse gas emission reductions on changes in the Earth's climate from 1850 to 2500 and created projections of global temperature and sea level rises.

'Past a point of no return':

Tags: Discovery, Environment, Future, Lifestyle, Nature, Neglect, Overpopulation, Parental Crime, Retribution, Science, Statistics, Survival, Weather, World

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

12-Nov-2020


Baby Yoda Canceled Amid Accusations of Genocide 

 

The bigger they are, the harder they fall. That also turns out to be true of the tiny.

Baby Yoda, who one year ago today cozied into the hearts of Star Wars fans with his bottomless eyes, fuzzy head, and adorable cooing, has invoked genuine social media wrath for last week's episode of The Mandalorian, in which the mystical infant remorselessly snacked on the eggs of an endangered galactic species.

Whether this is serious or silly depends, as Obi-Wan Kenobi would put it, on "a certain point of view."

In Chapter 10 of the Disney+ show, titled “The Passenger,” Pedro Pascal's bounty hunter agrees to ferry an amphibious alien woman known only as “Frog Lady” to a swampy distant world so she can fertilize her canister of eggs, which floated in the brine like peeled apricots. (Usually this show conjures memories of Boba Fett, but these called to mind boba tea.)

Baby Yoda Canceled Amid Accusations of Genocide

Tags: Backlash, Cancellation, Environment, Fantasy, Hostility, Nature, Overreaction, Reality, Science, Weird

Filed under: Gay+

Permalink

12-Nov-2020


A deadly bacteria is sweeping along the East Coast 

 

Taking a quick dip in a river or creek is a nice way to spend a warm afternoon, and rarely would you imagine that hopping into some seemingly freshwater could result in severe sickness or death days later. For an increasing number of very unfortunate people in North and South Carolina, that’s become a troubling reality.

Reports out of the Carolinas reveal that the prevalence of a bacteria called Vibrio is increasing steadily and has been over the past decade or more. A person can become infected after swimming in or touching water that is contaminated with the bacteria, but it’s what the bacteria does once it’s in your body that is truly frightening.

A deadly bacteria is sweeping along the East Coast

Tags: Awareness, Bacteria, Contamination, Death, Environment, Health, Illness, Science, Threat, Toxic, Water

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

05-Nov-2020


Animals Keep Evolving Into Crabs, Which Is Somewhat Disturbing 

 

We knew the long quarantine was making us all crabby, but this is extreme: People now feel fully betrayed by the long history of crabification (technically, “carcinization”) of different species over time. That means groups of crustaceans have evolved into crabs in five completely different contexts, giving rise to a meme that the long arc of history truly bends toward the crab.

So how does carcinization happen? Well, that part is pretty simple. Animals that live in similar habitats face obstacles that can shuttle them all toward the same evolutionary advantages. Britannica cites the marsupials as a key example, where despite having one critical difference from their “placental” counterparts in other parts of the world, the marsupials often correspond very closely to these other animals.

Animals can evolve separately but end up evolving toward other species, too, or even spontaneously evolve the same characteristics in totally separate groups. Birds and bats can both fly using mechanical wings. Birds and mammals are both warmblooded, but both evolved from groups that were not.

Animals Keep Evolving Into Crabs, Which Is Somewhat Disturbing

Tags: Animals, DNA, Environment, Evolution, Nature, Ocean, Science, Seafood, Study, Substitute, Survival

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

20-Oct-2020


'A harrowing time.' Ten states reported their highest number of new coronavirus cases on Friday 

 

Ten states reported their highest single-day tallies of new Covid-19 infections Friday, and the country reported its highest one-day total since July, as experts say a dangerous fall surge of coronavirus infections is well underway.

"This really is a harrowing time, and people have to be careful," epidemiologist Dr. Abdul El-Sayed told CNN on Saturday.

"When we saw this kind of transmission earlier in the pandemic, in March and April, the virus hadn't seeded everywhere ... This surge has the potential to be way worse than it was than either the spring or the summer," El-Sayed, Detroit's former health director, said.

The US reported more than 69,100 new Covid-19 infections Friday -- the most in a single day since about 71,300 were reported July 29, according to Johns Hopkins University data.

'A harrowing time.' Ten states reported their highest number of new coronavirus cases on Friday

Tags: Coronavirus, Death, Environment, Health, Illness, Population Control, Quarantine, Science, Surge, World

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

18-Oct-2020


Americans Are Dying In The Pandemic At Rates Far Higher Than In Other Countries 

 

During this pandemic, people in the United States are dying at rates unparalleled elsewhere in the world.

A new report in the Journal of the American Medical Association finds that in the past five months, per capita deaths in the U.S., both from COVID-19 and other causes, have been far greater than in 18 other high-income countries.

"It's shocking. It's horrible," says Dr. Ezekiel J. Emanuel, a professor of health policy and medical ethics at the University of Pennsylvania and one of the authors of the study.

"The United States really has done remarkably badly compared to other countries," he says. "I mean, remarkably badly."

Americans Are Dying In The Pandemic At Rates Far Higher Than In Other Countries

Tags: Americans, Care, Coronavirus, Death, Discipline, Environment, Etiquette, Fail, Health, Science, Study, Survival

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

14-Oct-2020


Doctor says soon trans men will be able to receive penis transplant surgery 

 

The doctor that has pioneered penis transplant surgery believes that soon it will become possible to operate a successful transplant.

“This would be a quantum leap if you were able to transplant a real penile structure. It’s certainly pushing the boundaries,” plastic surgeon Curtis Cetrulo, M.D. told MedPage Today.

“We’re ready to do it, and we could do it pretty soon if we get it approved,” the Boston doctor claimed.

Cetrulo, who works at Massachusetts General Hospital, was the first to complete a successful penis surgery in 2016. Now he has to convince the medical community and hospital administration that it can be done.

Doctor says soon trans men will be able to receive penis transplant surgery

Tags: Anatomy, Discovery, LGBTQ, Science, Self-esteem, Sex, Sex Identity, Study, Surgery

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

10-Oct-2020


A 5-cent sensor could detect the coronavirus in 10 minutes at home 

 

One of the hardest parts of controlling COVID-19 is that it’s very difficult to know if you or someone you know is carrying it asymptomatically. So you might let your guard down, spend time in close proximity to someone else, and help it spread. Testing is useful to curb this issue, but the wait on a test result can still take days. So it’s difficult to say for sure, at any given moment, if you actually have COVID-19 or not.

A new device being developed at Caltech, dubbed the SARS-CoV-2 RapidPlex, could put this uncertainty to an end. It’s a SARS-CoV-2 sensor that’s being designed for use at home. When it comes into contact with a drop of blood or saliva, it can determine if you’re infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus in a mere 10 minutes. The results of the test could be beamed right to your phone over Bluetooth.

A 5-cent sensor could detect the coronavirus in 10 minutes at home

Tags: Coronavirus, Development, Discovery, Experimentation, Safety, Science, Tech, Test

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

08-Oct-2020


'Long Covid': Why are some people not recovering? 

 

There is no medical definition or list of symptoms shared by all patients - two people with long Covid can have very different experiences.

However, the most common feature is crippling fatigue.

Others symptoms include: breathlessness, a cough that won't go away, joint pain, muscle aches, hearing and eyesight problems, headaches, loss of smell and taste as well as damage to the heart, lungs, kidneys and gut.

Mental health problems have been reported including depression, anxiety and struggling to think clearly.

It can utterly destroy people's quality of life. "My fatigue was like nothing I've experienced before," said one sufferer Jade Gray-Christie,

'Long Covid': Why are some people not recovering?

Tags: Coronavirus, Effect, Health, Injury, Medical, Science, Study

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

05-Oct-2020


Village of the Damned 3: when parents fear their changeling children 
 

How can you be sure your child is really your child? Could that innocent-seeming baby be a changeling – a cuckoo in your nest? There is something about the evil elf child, reborn as the alien walking among us, that continues to fascinate and terrify us. So much so, the broadcaster Sky has announced it has commissioned a third version of Village of the Damned from David Farr, the writer of The Night Manager.

The first, filmed in 1960, is a cult classic of understated British horror. The 1995 version, starring Christopher Reeves, translated the nightmare to small-town America.

Both were based on John Wyndham’s The Midwich Cuckoos, in which a whole village briefly loses consciousness. Nine months later, eerily identical alien babies with telepathic powers are born to the women. They are smarter and grow faster than normal – and are soon threatening not just their “parents”, but all humankind.

Teenagers are again euphorically embracing revolution, literally toppling statues in joyful Black Lives Matter protest and skipping school to protest climate change.

Meanwhile, the widespread use of social media in itself can produce a hive mind effect. Although social media was intended to support free speech and allow anyone to share their opinion, the effect of a Twitter pile-on can be to crush nuance, doubt or divergence. Commentators, such as Gavin Haynes, have highlighted the resulting purity spirals in which nobody can stand alone.

Both the single-minded power of the Chinese state and the collective force of an online horde echo the strength of the Midwich aliens versus the fragmented, conflicted arguments of the humans opposing them. The aliens’ power was that they were not individuals – they were parts of a single entity with a single idea – to survive. As in Wyndham’s time, we again face a real contrast between individualism and groupthink.

Village of the Damned 3

Tags: Book, Effect, Environment, Film, Film Trivia, History, Opinion, Parenting, Politics, Psychology, Representation, Science, Social Media, Youth

Filed under: Gay+

Permalink

05-Oct-2020


Why Ibram Kendi Is Facing a Backlash Over a Tweet About Amy Coney Barrett's Adopted Haitian Children 

 

Barrett, a white woman, is the mother to seven children—including two Black children she and her husband adopted from Haiti. Some commentators, such as right-wing pundit Candace Owens, had suggested that this signifies she cannot be accused of being racist. Kendi argued, however, that adopting Black children does not necessarily mean a person is not racist, although he also did not call Barrett racist.

"Some White colonizers 'adopted' Black children. They 'civilized' these 'savage' children in the 'superior' ways of White people, while using them as props in their lifelong pictures of denial, while cutting the biological parents of these children out of the picture of humanity," Kendi, a professor of humanities at Boston University, tweeted on Saturday.

Why Ibram Kendi Is Facing a Backlash Over a Tweet About Amy Coney Barrett's Adopted Haitian Children

Tags: Adoption, Backlash, Celebrity, Children, Cultural, Parental Burden, Parental Responsibility, Politics, Racial Tension, Science

Filed under: Gay+

Permalink

27-Sep-2020


The big-hipped and chunky-thighed live longer than the pot-bellied 

 

Hip hip hooray!

People with chunky thighs or large hips are less likely to die early compared to those with bigger bellies, a new study suggests.

The study, published this week in the medical journal BMJ, says that central fatness or fat stored around the abdomen is associated with a higher risk of early death from any cause — regardless of overall body fat – while larger hips and thighs are associated with a lower risk.

The big-hipped and chunky-thighed live longer than the pot-bellied

Tags: Daddy Squish, Science, Solutions, Statistics, Survival, Terraforming, Women

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

25-Sep-2020


A rare blue moon will light up the sky on Halloween 

 

Spooky season is almost upon us -- and this year it will be a little bit spookier.

The night sky on Halloween will be illuminated by a blue moon, the second full moon in a month. The relatively rare occurrence happens once every two and a half years on average, according to NASA's National Space Science Data Center.
Every month has a full moon, but because the lunar cycle and the calendar year aren't perfectly synched, about every three years we wind up with two in the same calendar month.

A rare blue moon will light up the sky on Halloween

Tags: Environment, Halloween, Moon, Science, Space

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

20-Sep-2020




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