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All Posts Tagged as 'Treatment'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Parents are poisoning their autistic children with bleach. The alarming trend is promoted online as a 'miracle cure.' 

 

Some parents are poisoning their children with chlorine dioxide to heal autism, according to an NBC News investigation.

The alarming so-called treatment is being promoted online by proponents who claim it's a "miracle cure."

Chlorine dioxide can cause irreparable bodily harm, doctors warn. It damages the digestive system and wreaks havoc on red blood cells.

"It can lead to kidney damage and kidney failure," Dr. Daniel Brooks, medical director at Banner University Medical Center's Poison and Drug Information Center and Outpatient Toxicology Clinic in Phoenix, told NBC News.

Brooks described the use of the chemical as a treatment for autism as "ludicrous."

The Blaze

Tags: Awareness, Backlash, Chemicals, Children, Disease, Health, Interference, Medical, Parental Burden, Parental Crime, Poison, Responsibility, Safety, Science, Toxic, Treatment, Warning

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

22-May-2019


Decriminalise prostitution, say nurses 

 

The Royal College of Nursing is to start lobbying government to change the law after members voted in favour of the move at their annual conference.

Nurses said the current law put sex workers at risk and deterred them from seeking help from the NHS.

Delegates heard how sex workers are put off reporting attacks because of fears of prosecution.

There are believed to be more than 70,000 sex workers in the UK - nine in 10 of which are women.

Louise Cahill, a clinical nurse specialist in sexual health from south west England, who proposed the motion, said: "Current UK law makes it a criminal offence for sex workers to work together for safety. Brothel keeping is defined as just two or more sex workers working together.

"Therefore, sex workers have to choose between keeping safe and getting arrested. No one should be put in danger by the law.

BBC

Tags: Employment, Environment, Equality, Health, Laws, Leaders, Safety, Sex Worker, Survival, Treatment, World

Filed under: Gay+

Permalink

21-May-2019


Broken Leg Syndrome: Why Don’t We Take Meds for Our Mental Health? 

 

For twenty-five years, I’ve had to work through anxiety, depression and all sorts of mental health stuff. What have I learned?

You need the right team to stay healthy. And just like any illness, it will likely start with some sort of medical intervention. But many times, people turn up their nose at the idea of taking medication for mental health.

Then, I ask what happens if you break a leg. This is what I use to help people understand why therapy and meds are often the first line of defense for mental health.

So, let’s say you break your leg.

What’s your first move?

A. Go vegan

B. Walk it off

C. Pray over it

D. Go to the hospital and get it set in a cast.

The answer, of course, is D. You can pray over it too. But what’s the first step? A broken leg is a trauma—treat it as such.

The Root

Tags: Medicine, Mental Health, Portrait, Race, Recovery, Treatment

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

21-May-2019


Two men arrested after 18 year old falls from condo after alleged three-way 

 

A doctor and his male friend have been arrested after an 18-year-old man fell to his death after an alleged three-way.

Police apprehended the pair after their guest fell from a balcony at the doctor’s 20th floor condo in Bangkok, Thailand on Saturday (18 May).

A police source at Thong Lor police station told The Nation that the two suspects appeared to be under the influence of crystal methamphetamine.

What happened?

Thong Lor precinct officers received the report of the victim’s death at 3.30pm on Saturday.

Police authorities examined the building’s CCTV recordings. They reportedly found the victim entered the condo block with two older men, both in their 30s, and went up to the 20th floor with them.

One of the men alleged the teen became intoxicated and fell from the balcony. Locals found him on the street wearing only a G-string.

Gay Star News

Three men attacked a gay couple in their own store

Tags: Accident, Arrest, Attack, Death, Drugs, Hate, Homophobia, Inhumanity, Injury, LGBTQ, Lifestyle, Sex, Store, Treatment, Video, World, Youth

Filed under: Gay+

Permalink

21-May-2019


California Senate advances bill to provide abortion pill access for public university students at no cost 

 

The California state Senate passed a piece of legislation on Monday that would require its public university systems — the University of California and California State University — to offer students access to abortion pills at no cost in the early weeks of pregnancy. The initiative would be made possible through privately-funded grants and insurance coverage.


The bill, Senate Bill 24, the College Student Right to Access Act, mandates that student health services clinics at all 34 public university campuses in California provide women access to "abortion by medication techniques" in early pregnancy, according to the bill's text. If passed, the legislation would give $200,000 to each student health center to pay for necessary training and equipment, and an additional $200,000 to set up a 24-hour hotline. The service would come at no cost to the woman seeking an abortion.

"We're going to expand access because that's what we do in California: we lead," said Sen. Connie Leyva, the bill's primary sponsor, in a telephone interview with CBS News on Tuesday. Senate analysis of the proposal notes that according to the National Institutes of Health, "ending a pregnancy with medications is an option for women who are less than ten weeks pregnant and would like to have an abortion at home with a less invasive procedure."

CBS News

Lipslut Is Donating Its Proceeds To Organizations Supporting Reproductive Rights

‘We’re not going to have this’: Nationwide protests of extreme abortion bans draw thousands

Tags: $, Abortion, Activism, Business, Campaign, Choices, Donation, Education, Environment, Govt, Instructional, Keep Abortion Legal, Laws, Politics, Pregnancy, Product, Protection, Support, Treatment, Woman's Rights

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

21-May-2019


Poll: Many Rural Americans Struggle With Financial Insecurity, Access To Health Care 

 

Polling by NPR finds that while rural Americans are mostly satisfied with life, there is a strong undercurrent of financial insecurity that can create very serious problems for many people living in rural communities.

The findings come from two surveys NPR has done with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health on day-to-day life and health in rural America.

After a major poll we did last fall found that a majority (55%) of rural Americans rate their local economy as only fair or poor, we undertook a second survey early this year to find out more about economic insecurity and health. The poll looked beyond the known factors of job loss and the decades-long flight of young people to more urban areas.

Several findings stand out: A substantial number (40%) of rural Americans struggle with routine medical bills, food and housing. And about half (49%) say they could not afford to pay an unexpected $1,000 expense of any type.

npr

Tags: $, Environment, Health, Inclusion, Policy, Poverty, Responsibility, Safety, Survival, Treatment

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

21-May-2019


A pastor reportedly gave ‘miracle water’ to Ugandans. It was bleach. 

 

An American pastor has been accused of distributing a poisonous “miracle drink” to thousands of Ugandans, including infants, according to a report by the Guardian.

Robert Baldwin — founder of a Christian nonprofit based in New Jersey — was providing a bogus “miracle cure” to almost 50,000 Ugandans, according to the outlet’s original reporting. In conjunction with Sam Little, a supposed British clairvoyant, Baldwin was promoting the substance as a cure for many diseases, including cancer, malaria and HIV/AIDS.

The cure? Known as “miracle mineral solution,” or MMS, the substance consists of sodium chlorite and citric acid, which combine to create chlorine dioxide, an industrial bleach. The U.S. Embassy in Kampala on Monday condemned the distribution of the substance.

In an interview with NJ Advance Media, Baldwin denied distributing the “cure” and said he had to shut down his operations because of the hate coming his way.

Washington Post

Pakistan Doctor Arrested After 400 Children Test Positive for HIV

Tags: Abuse, Backlash, Children, Disease, Employment, Environment, Health, Inhumanity, Interference, Medical, Medicine, Misrepresentation, Outbreak, Poison, Religion, Safety, Training, Treatment, World

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

21-May-2019


"You cannot find a soulmate," relationship expert Belinda Luscombe says 

 

It's well known that love, respect and trust are all crucial components for a strong marriage, but a new book suggests that science plays an important role, too.

Belinda Luscombe, author of "Marriageology: The Art and Science of Staying Together," shared what her research reveals about what can help strengthen a relationship.

One of Luscombe's major findings may come as a surprise: She says you'll never meet your soulmate.

"You cannot find a soulmate," she said Tuesday on "CBS This Morning." "The search for a soulmate is like searching for the only one pair of trousers that would make you happy."

CBS News

Tags: Advice, Love, Opinion, Relationships, Science, Support, Treatment

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

21-May-2019


Majority of LGBTQ people report being sexually harassed in the workplace 

 

A report published yesterday (May 17) on International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia revealed that the majority of LGBTQ people in the workplace have been sexually harassed.

The report surveyed 1,000 LGBTQ respondents and 68% said they had faced one type of sexual harassment at work. A lot of these were inappropriate jokes and probing questions about their sex lives.

35% of LGBTQ women reported having experienced unwanted touching, and a further 21% reported some form of sexual assault. A further 12% said they had been either seriously sexually assaulted or raped at work. When compared to men, only 7% reported having been seriously sexually assaulted or raped.

These figures increased significantly when it came to black or minority ethnic women. Out of these, 54% experienced unwanted touching, 45% reported having been sexually assaulted, and a further 27% reported either serious sexual assault or rape.

Gay Times

Survey: One in six women say they were sexually harassed at Coachella and Stagecoach 2019

Ohio State team doctor sexually abused 177 students over decades, report finds

Tags: All Rights, Business, Concert, Education, Employment, Entertainment, Environment, Harassment, Policy, Rape, Safety, Sex, Study, Training, Treatment, Youth

Filed under: Gay+

Permalink

20-May-2019


Experts Say Long-Lasting Couples Always Do These 8 Things Together 

 

When you see couples who have been together for years and are still happily in love, you may ask yourself what do they know that everyone else doesn't. The truth is, maintaining a long-lasting relationship isn't easy. Not everyone can do it. But if you want your relationship to last, there are a few key things you and your partner need to do.


First off, it's important to remember that relationships take work. As sex and relationship therapist, Cyndi Darnell tells Bustle, couples who last recognize that relationships are living things that need nourishment. "Relationships are not static monoliths," she says. "Just like a plant or a pet, living things need sustenance to survive. Love alone is not enough, especially when there's no identifiable expression of it on a regular basis."

Long-lasting couples not only love each other, but they also do things each day to show their love. Showing your partner that you care doesn't require anything special or out of the ordinary. It can be as simple as doing a thoughtful act of service or really listening when they have something important to say.

Bustle

Tags: Dating, Environment, List, Mental Health, Relationships, Treatment, World

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

20-May-2019


I Was Raised by a Dad With Bipolar Disorder, and Here's What I Want Other Parents to Know 

 

There were a lot of ups and downs growing up with my father. There was the side of my dad that was so full of life. He'd be the center of attention, throwing huge get-togethers at our house and chatting energetically with everyone around him, including his kids. I remember how easily he made people laugh and put them at ease.

Then there was the side of my dad that drove me and my friends to a nearby theme park, quickly became annoyed with everything we said or did, and then fell asleep on a park bench for three hours. On vacations, he would shift from enjoying himself to disappearing from us for long periods at a time. More commonly, he struggled to focus during conversations with his family or his work clients.

Even with my dad's happier moods, there were so many moments, days, months, even years of pain that consumed my childhood. There were a lot of times he was unbearable to be around. I often chose not to invite friends over, afraid he'd have an episode while they were there. As a young girl and even throughout my teenage years, it was really hard to witness my dad's severe mood swings. When he was hyper and joyful, it was contagious — but when his mood changed, I took it so personally, truly feeling as though I must have done or said something to make him act that way.

Popsugar

Tags: Environment, Family, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Portrait, Relationships, Responsibility, Treatment

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

20-May-2019


Stop Brushing Your Teeth With Charcoal Toothpaste 

 

Trendy toothpastes made with charcoal are likely a worse option for your teeth than traditional toothpaste, according to some British dentists. In a new paper, they argue that the claims behind these products, like better whitening, are completely unproven, and that they might even speed along tooth decay and other dental problems.

Charcoal has become a major novelty ingredient to add to whatever consumer product you can think of, whether it’s burger buns or makeup. But it isn’t just a pitch-black look that some companies are marketing; they’re also often claiming that charcoal will clear out toxins, ward off infections, or just plain make you healthier. In the case of charcoal toothpastes, they’re supposed to be better at whitening teeth, cleaning off stains, and preventing bad breath than conventional toothpastes.

But the authors behind this paper, published in the British Dental Journal, argue that the new fad of charcoal toothpastes is essentially bunk. They point to a lack of any supporting evidence showing that these products are somehow better at cleaning and whitening teeth than other modern toothpastes. And there are plenty of reasons to think that they’d be worse.

Gizmodo

This Is What Fish Oil Supplements Actually Do

Tags: Dental, Health, Medical, Product, Safety, Study, Treatment, Vitamins

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

17-May-2019


Suicide Rate For Girls Has Been Rising Faster Than For Boys, Study Finds 

 

The number of people dying by suicide in the U.S. has been rising, and a new study shows that the suicide rate among young teenage girls has been increasing faster than it has for boys of the same age.

Boys are still more likely to take their own lives. But the study published Friday in JAMA Network Open finds that girls are steadily narrowing that gap.

Researchers examined more than 85,000 youth suicides that occurred between 1975 and 2016. Donna Ruch, a researcher at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, who worked on the study, tells NPR that a major shift occurred after 2007.

Researchers found the increase was highest for girls ages 10 to 14, rising by nearly 13% since 2007. While for boys of the same age, it rose by 7%.

"That's where we saw the most significant narrowing of the gender gap," Ruch says.

npr

Tags: Children, Environment, Heritage, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Psychology, Study, Suicide, Support, Treatment, Youth

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

17-May-2019


"Not a big deal": Police commander's text after Eric Garner's death draws gasps at trial 
 

A New York Police Department commander texted "Not a big deal" to an officer in 2014 after learning Eric Garner had most likely died during a police encounter, according to testimony Thursday. CBS radio affiliate WCBS reports there were audible gasps as Lt. Christopher Bannon's texts to Sgt. Dhanan Saminath were displayed during the departmental trial for officer Daniel Pantaleo.

Pantaleo is accused of using a banned chokehold on Garner, which a medical examiner testified this week set into motion "a lethal sequence of events." Garner, a father of six, had been arrested for selling untaxed cigarettes numerous times and was suspected of doing the same when officers approached him, police said. Garner, who had asthma, suffered a heart attack in an ambulance and was pronounced dead at a hospital.

CBS News

Tags: Abuse, Arrest, Court, Death, Employment, Environment, Exclusivity, Inhumanity, Police, Profiling, Race, Training, Treatment

Filed under: Gay+

Permalink

17-May-2019


Counties Most At-Risk For Measles Outbreaks Span Across The Country, According To This Eye-Opening Map 

 

At least 10 measles outbreaks have erupted across the United States in 2019, prompting discussions regarding the importance of vaccinations. This pressing topic resurfaced again when, on Tuesday, May 9, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Johns Hopkins University highlighted the counties most at-risk for measles outbreaks via an eye-opening map. The data-driven graphic reiterates the documented relationship between low-vaccination areas and outbreaks, proving once again that vaccinations are key in preventing the spread of this infectious disease.

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Johns Hopkins University recently teamed up to identify the top counties at-risk for measles outbreaks, using a risk-analysis model that examined international travel and vaccination rates. The results, published in the The Lancet Infectious Diseases, found that areas with high international travel and low-vaccination rates are hotspots for measles outbreaks.

Romper

Who's behind measles vaccines misinformation?...

Tags: Contagion, Disease, Environment, Health, Investigation, Misrepresentation, Nature, Parental Burden, Protection, Reckless, Religion, Safety, Travel, Treatment, Vaccine, Video

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

17-May-2019




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