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All Posts Tagged as 'Study'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Still Disinfecting Surfaces? It Might Not Be Worth It 

 

At the start of the pandemic, stores quickly sold out of disinfectant sprays and wipes. People were advised to wipe down their packages and the cans they bought at the grocery store.

But scientists have learned a lot this year about the coronavirus and how it's transmitted, and it turns out all that scrubbing and disinfecting might not be necessary.

If a person infected with the coronavirus sneezes, coughs or talks loudly, droplets containing particles of the virus can travel through the air and eventually land on nearby surfaces. But the risk of getting infected from touching a surface contaminated by the virus is low, says Emanuel Goldman, a microbiologist at Rutgers University.

In retrospect, Marr says that was "overkill." Today, she says, "all the evidence points toward breathing in the virus from the air as being the most important route of transmission."

Scientists now know that the early surface studies were done in pristine lab conditions using much larger amounts of virus than would be found in a real-life scenario.

Even so, many of us continue to attack door handles, packages and groceries with disinfectant wipes, and workers across the U.S. spend hours disinfecting surfaces in public areas like airports, buildings and subways.

There's no scientific data to justify this, says Dr. Kevin Fennelly, a respiratory infection specialist with the National Institutes of Health.

Still Disinfecting Surfaces? It Might Not Be Worth It

Tags: Choices, Clean, Coronavirus, Environment, Overreaction, Science, Study

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

29-Dec-2020


Men Find Bromances 'Emotionally Rival' Romantic Relationships, Study Reveals 

 

Men find that platonic friendships with other men 'emotionally rival' their romantic relationships with women, according to a study in Men and Masculinities.

Those surveyed said 'the lack of boundaries and judgment' in their friendships with other men resulted in 'elevated emotional stability, enhanced emotional disclosure, social fulfilment, and better conflict resolution, compared to the emotional lives they shared with girlfriends'.

Most of the participants answers to the survey also made reference to the fact they felt more like they could be their real self with their bros.

As one respondent said: "Tim knows I love listening to Taylor Swift and Beyoncé, but I keep that quiet [around my girlfriend] because she would judge me. I feel like I have to be more manly around her."

Men Find Bromances 'Emotionally Rival' Romantic Relationships, Study Reveals

Tags: Bromance, Choices, Environment, Evolution, Friendship, Investment, Lifestyle, Men In Charge, Mental Health, Nature, Priorities, Psychology, Relationships, Self-esteem, Study, Support, Treatment, Youth

Filed under: Health/Food

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25-Dec-2020


Majority of Americans hate socialism, reject AOC: survey 

 

Nearly 60 percent of the country thinks poorly of Progressive darling Rep. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez and 75 percent want nothing to do with the socialism she preaches.

Asked whether the free-market economy or socialism was better, 75 percent of likely voters chose capitalism, while 11 percent backed socialism, according to a Heartland Institute/Rasmussen poll.

Another 14 percent said they were “not sure.”

“Likely voters hate socialism,” the pollster said.

“Despite the countless calls for more socialism among elites in media and Hollywood, Americans aren’t interested in adopting the same socialist policies that have led to mass poverty wherever they have been tried,” the Illinois-based nonprofit said in a statement released Wednesday, the Washington Times reported.

Majority of Americans hate socialism, reject AOC: survey

Socialism: The Failed Idea That Never Dies

Tags: Americans, Fail, History, Politics, Poll, Socialism, Study

Filed under: Gay+

Permalink

24-Dec-2020


New mutated coronavirus from South Africa is "highly concerning" - BBC News 

 

The UK government has said it is “highly concerned” about two cases of a new mutation of the coronavirus which have been identified in people who have arrived from South Africa.

Video

Hi-tide GIF WARNING: That's a nice gif but its making me dizzy. Don't stare at it. Move On. 23-Dec-2020

Tags: Coronavirus, Culture, Effect, Environment, Health, Interference, Mutation, Nature, Safety, Study, Surge, Test, Video, World

Filed under: Health/Food

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23-Dec-2020


Deadly 'Brain-Eating' Amoeba Slowly But Surely Expanding Its Footprint in The US 

 

Deadly "brain-eating amoeba" infections have historically occurred in the Southern United States. But cases have been appearing farther north in recent years, likely because of climate change, a new study finds.

The study researchers, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), examined cases of this brain-eating amoeba, known as Naegleria fowleri, over a four-decade period in the US.

They found that, although the number of cases that occur each year has remained about the same, the geographic range of these cases has been shifting northward, with more cases popping up in Midwestern states than before.

Deadly 'Brain-Eating' Amoeba Slowly But Surely Expanding Its Footprint in The US

Tags: Brain, Contamination, Death, Environment, Evolution, Exclusivity, Nature, Retribution, Science, Study, Survival, Terraforming

Filed under: Health/Food

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17-Dec-2020


New technique proves capable of reversing age-related vision loss 

 

Scientists have made some great advancements in the field of age-related illnesses, but actually turning back time on the DNA of a living creature remains an elusive holy grail. We know that DNA gradually breaks down as a person grows older. We see that damage as aging and various age-related illnesses tend to pop up the older a person gets and the more their genes degrade.

Now, researchers from Harvard Medical School appear to have made a big leap in reversing aging in mice. More specifically, the researchers managed to revitalize the vision of aging mice by giving them a boost using genes that are present during early development.

New technique proves capable of reversing age-related vision loss

Tags: Aging, Discovery, Eye, Science, Study, Treatment

Filed under: Health/Food

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04-Dec-2020


Here’s the real story behind Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘The Birds’ 

 

In the Santa Cruz Sentinel, August 18, 1961, there is an account of thousands of birds raining down from the sky at 3 a.m.—crashing into homes and cars in Capitola and Pleasure Point, California just off Monterey Bay. Eight persons were reported bitten. This is the bird: Ardenna grisea, the sooty shearwater.

“The word of the bird invasion spread fast throughout the state,” notes the article, “and a phone call came to The Sentinel from mystery thriller producer Alfred Hitchcock from Hollywood.” He requested a copy of that day’s paper. After all, the famed director was adapting a particular 1952 Daphne du Maurier story into a screenplay on the subject of killer birds. And less than two years later, Hitchcock’s The Birds premiered.

Prevailing theories at the time supposed the sooty shearwaters got lost in the fog. But if flocking birds were easily confused in low visibility, which is pretty normal up and down coastal California, then shearwater invasions would be as common as passing rain. So, in order to understand what happened, first you need to know how a flock of birds—like thousands of shearwaters—fly and move together.

Here’s the real story behind Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘The Birds’

Tags: Animals, Environment, Film, Film Trivia, Health, Lifestyle, Nature, Science, Study, World

Filed under: Gay+

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03-Dec-2020


Dog owners may catch COVID-19 more often, but the reason will surprise you 

 

You probably already know the ins-and-outs of how to protect yourself from COVID-19 when it comes to dealing with other human beings. If you do have to be around people, don’t get too close, wear a mask, and try to stay outside. But, having a friendly dog can make those interactions tricker. After all, many dog owners have been dragged across the street to meet a new fuzzy friend and their owner, whether they like it or not.

One study recently published in Environmental Research found that pet owners who take their dogs on walks have a 78 percent higher chance of catching COVID-19 compared to pup-less peers in a survey of over 2000 people. That’s higher than even that of people still going onsite to work.

Dog owners may catch COVID-19 more often, but the reason will surprise you

Tags: Animals, Awareness, Contagion, Environment, Etiquette, Health, Lifestyle, Nature, Neighbor, Safety, Science, Study

Filed under: Health/Food

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03-Dec-2020


Dog walking increases odds of catching COVID by 78 percent, here's why 

 

A group of researchers in Spain have been looking at how different regular activities affect your chances of catching the coronavirus, and there is some bad news: Walking the dog increases your odds of catching COVID by 78 percent.

Dog walking increases odds of catching COVID by 78 percent, here's why

Dog owners can enjoy perks and gifts all weekend long for ‘Packed Weekend’ in New York City

Tags: Animals, Celebration, Choices, Contagion, Coronavirus, Environment, Pets, Responsibility, Safety, Science, Social Distancing, Statistics, Study, Threat, Weird

Filed under: Health/Food

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19-Nov-2020


These are the most hated states in America, and #1 is not a surprise 

 

How much do you love your home state? How much do you hate other states? For most of us, it’s something we probably don’t think about that often, but the folks at BestLife? Well, they’re on top of it, and they’ve crunched the numbers to come up with a ranking of the 50 U.S. states based on how much they are hated.

The “Hatred Index” that BestLife came up with is based on a number of factors, including surveys where residents expressed how much (or little) pride they had in their state, how many people are moving into or out of the state, and a poll where people picked which state they hate the most, whether it was their own home state or a different one.

Let’s start with the positive side, because it’s been a rough year and we could all use a bit more positivity these days. Here are the least hated states, according to the data:

These are the most hated states in America, and #1 is not a surprise

Tags: Best/Worst, Choices, Environment, State, Study

Filed under: Health/Food

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21-Oct-2020


Animals Keep Evolving Into Crabs, Which Is Somewhat Disturbing 

 

We knew the long quarantine was making us all crabby, but this is extreme: People now feel fully betrayed by the long history of crabification (technically, “carcinization”) of different species over time. That means groups of crustaceans have evolved into crabs in five completely different contexts, giving rise to a meme that the long arc of history truly bends toward the crab.

So how does carcinization happen? Well, that part is pretty simple. Animals that live in similar habitats face obstacles that can shuttle them all toward the same evolutionary advantages. Britannica cites the marsupials as a key example, where despite having one critical difference from their “placental” counterparts in other parts of the world, the marsupials often correspond very closely to these other animals.

Animals can evolve separately but end up evolving toward other species, too, or even spontaneously evolve the same characteristics in totally separate groups. Birds and bats can both fly using mechanical wings. Birds and mammals are both warmblooded, but both evolved from groups that were not.

Animals Keep Evolving Into Crabs, Which Is Somewhat Disturbing

Tags: Animals, DNA, Environment, Evolution, Nature, Ocean, Science, Seafood, Study, Substitute, Survival

Filed under: Health/Food

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20-Oct-2020


Americans Are Dying In The Pandemic At Rates Far Higher Than In Other Countries 

 

During this pandemic, people in the United States are dying at rates unparalleled elsewhere in the world.

A new report in the Journal of the American Medical Association finds that in the past five months, per capita deaths in the U.S., both from COVID-19 and other causes, have been far greater than in 18 other high-income countries.

"It's shocking. It's horrible," says Dr. Ezekiel J. Emanuel, a professor of health policy and medical ethics at the University of Pennsylvania and one of the authors of the study.

"The United States really has done remarkably badly compared to other countries," he says. "I mean, remarkably badly."

Americans Are Dying In The Pandemic At Rates Far Higher Than In Other Countries

Tags: Americans, Care, Coronavirus, Death, Discipline, Environment, Etiquette, Fail, Health, Science, Study, Survival

Filed under: Health/Food

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14-Oct-2020


Getting enough sleep isn’t considered ‘manly’, study finds, because that’s how literally exhausting toxic masculinity is 

 

According to research published in the Journal of the Association for Consumer Research, a combination of six studies have found that “sleeping less is related to increased perceptions of masculinity, and increased masculinity is related to decreased perceived sleep amounts”.

As well as this, “based on how much they sleep, men face social judgements favouring men who sleep less”.

Getting enough sleep isn’t considered ‘manly’, study finds, because that’s how literally exhausting toxic masculinity is

Tags: Etiquette, Fear, Identity, Judgment, Men, Sleep, Study

Filed under: Health/Food

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13-Oct-2020


Doctor says soon trans men will be able to receive penis transplant surgery 

 

The doctor that has pioneered penis transplant surgery believes that soon it will become possible to operate a successful transplant.

“This would be a quantum leap if you were able to transplant a real penile structure. It’s certainly pushing the boundaries,” plastic surgeon Curtis Cetrulo, M.D. told MedPage Today.

“We’re ready to do it, and we could do it pretty soon if we get it approved,” the Boston doctor claimed.

Cetrulo, who works at Massachusetts General Hospital, was the first to complete a successful penis surgery in 2016. Now he has to convince the medical community and hospital administration that it can be done.

Doctor says soon trans men will be able to receive penis transplant surgery

Tags: Anatomy, Discovery, LGBTQ, Science, Self-esteem, Sex, Sex Identity, Study, Surgery

Filed under: Health/Food

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10-Oct-2020


Study Shows People Prefer Robot Over Their Boss: 6 Ways To Be A Leader People Prefer 

 

These are stressful times—among the most stressful in history—and people need help. Often, they turn to their employers and specifically their leaders. But they don’t always get what they need. A new global study reports people actually prefer robots to humans for help with mental health issues. So what’s going on, and how can leaders be more empathetic, supportive and preferable to robots?

It’s important to know the issues plaguing employees are significant. In a just-released global study involving more than 12,000 people across 11 countries by Oracle and Workplace Intelligence, 78% of people reported their mental health had been negatively affected during the pandemic. In addition, people said stress, anxiety and depression were reducing their productivity (42%) and increasing poor decision making (40%).

And interestingly, 68% say when they have stress or anxiety at work, if given a choice between a robot or their boss, they would rather talk to a robot than their own manager. While the results may not indicate our future managers will all be robots, they do illustrate important ways leaders can improve and support their employees.

Study Shows People Prefer Robot Over Their Boss: 6 Ways To Be A Leader People Prefer

Tags: AI, Employment, Equality, Investment, Mental Health, Performance, Preference, Robot, Satisfaction, Study, Treatment

Filed under: Health/Food

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07-Oct-2020




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