Errattic

Home About Us All Fuctasia_(NSFW) Games Gay+ Health/Food Movies Music Musings Photos_(NSFW) TV Wisps Preferences

Home Page > Current Page


Top Tags

Abuse
Action
Advice
All Rights
Americans
Art
Backlash
Bullying
Business
Celebration
Celebrity
Children
Choices
Comedy
Coming Out
Community
Court
Crime
Daddy Squish
Dance
Dedication
Discrimination
Disease
Education
Employment
Entertainment
Environment
Exclusivity
Family
Fear
Finance
Funny
Gay
Gay Rights
Govt
Hairy
Hate
Health
History
Homophobia
Horror
Hostility
Hot Swatch
Hypocrisy
Ignorance
Inclusion
Interview
Investigation
Justice
Laws
Lifestyle
Magic Splatter
Mass Appeal
Mat
Mental Health
Music
New World Order
Opinion
Parental Burden
Parenting
Perception
Political
Politics
Portrait
Pride
Privilege
Protest
Racism
Reckless
Relationships
Religion
Respect
Romance
Sad
Safety
Science
Self Interest
Service
Sex
Social Media
Sports
Stepping Up
Study
Support
Sweet
Tats
Toxic
Transgender
Travel
Treatment
Tribute
TV Gay Swatch
Unity
Video
Violence
Weird
Woman's Rights
Women
World
Youth


Login

Create Profile
Login


This site does not claim credit for images, videos, or music, except where noted. Let us know if we have used your media and would like it removed.


©2019 Errattic.com

Restricted to Adults
This site does not claim credit for images, videos, or music, except where noted. Let us know if we have used your media and would like it removed.


Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Opinion'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Chris Cuomo Makes Heartfelt Plea To End The Stigma Surrounding Mental Illness 

 

Chris Cuomo would ask for an end to mental illness, and not for world peace, if a genie from a bottle ever granted him a wish.

“Why? Peace is temporary, we know that,” the host of CNN’s “Cuomo Prime Time” explained on Thursday night.

“Mental illness is too often, forever,” he added.

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, and Cuomo dedicated an entire segment of his show to tackling the stigma surrounding mental illness.

Huffpost

Tags: Awareness, Celebration, Daddy Squish, Dedication, Disease, Environment, Mental Health, Opinion, Respect, Saving The Environment!, Suicide, Support, Survival, Treatment, Video, World

Permalink

06-May-2019


HOMO ABSURDUS: WE NO LONGER DESERVE THE TITLE OF ‘WISE HUMAN’ HOMO SAPIENS 

 


Homo sapiens means wise human, but the name no longer suits us. As an evolutionary biologist who writes about Darwinian interpretations of human motivations and cultures, I propose that at some point we became what we are today: Homo absurdus, a human that spends its whole life trying to convince itself that its existence is not absurd.

As French philosopher Albert Camus put it: “Man is the only creature who refuses to be what he is.” Thanks to this entrenched absurdity, the 21st century is riding on a runaway train of converging catastrophes in the Anthropocene.

Discovery of self

The critical juncture in the lineage toward Homo absurdus was described by evolutionist Theodosius Dobzhansky: “A being who knows that he will die arose from ancestors who did not know.” But evolution at some point also built into this human mind a deeply ingrained sentiment—that one has not just a material life (the physical body), but also a distinct and separate mental life (the inner self).

Newsweek

Tags: Ecology, Education, Environment, History, Humanity, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Nature, Opinion, Perception, Psychology, Science, Survival, World

Permalink

06-May-2019


AirPods Are a Tragedy 

 

Future Relics is a column about the objects that our society is currently making, and how they may explain our lives to future generations. In each article, we'll focus on one item that could conceivably be discovered by someone 1,000 years from now, and try to explain where this item came from, where it's going, and what its existence explains about our current moment.

AirPods are a product of the past.

They're plastic, made of some combination of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, and sulfur. They’re tungsten, tin, tantalum, lithium, and cobalt.

The particles that make up these elements were created 13.8 billion years ago, during the Big Bang. Humans extract these elements from the earth, heat them, refine them. As they work, humans breathe in airborne particles, which deposit in their lungs. The materials are shipped from places like Vietnam, South Africa, Kazakhstan, Peru, Mexico, Indonesia, and India, to factories in China. A literal city of workers creates four tiny computing chips and assembles them into a logic board. Sensors, microphones, grilles, and an antenna are glued together and packaged into a white, strange-looking plastic exoskeleton.

These are AirPods. They’re a collection of atoms born at the dawn of the universe, churned beneath the surface of the earth, and condensed in an anthropogenic parallel to the Big Crunch—a proposed version of the death of the universe where all matter shrinks and condenses together. Workers are paid unlivable wages in more than a dozen countries to make this product possible. Then it’s sold by Apple, the world’s first trillion-dollar company, for $159 USD.

Vice

Tags: Environment, Nature, Opinion, Perception, Privilege, Science, Tech, Waste, Writing

Permalink

06-May-2019


Your House Should Not Be Your Retirement Plan 

 

The average American is more likely to own a home than to have saved enough money for retirement. In fact, for many Americans, their house is their retirement plan: They’re counting on the value of that nest egg to fuel their golden years. But while real estate can be a good investment, it isn’t wise to rely on a house to fund your retirement. To explore why, Barron’s spoke with Teresa Ghilarducci, the Irene and Bernard L. Schwartz Chair in economic policy analysis in the Economics Department at the New School, and the author of How to Retire With Enough Money.

“You can’t eat your house a sandwich at a time,” she says.

Barrons

Tags: Aging, Choices, Economy, Finance, Home, Insurance, Interview, Opinion, Real Estate, Retirement, Seniors, Support, Survival, Tax

Permalink

30-Apr-2019


When Psychedelics Make Your Last Months Alive Worth Living 

 

In the spring of 2018, Dan G. learned that the melanoma he had beaten 18 years earlier had returned and spread to his liver and lungs. After several months of chemo and immunotherapy, the 44-year-old decided the traditional treatments he’d been undergoing weren’t enough. The crippling side effects of the drugs had left him feeling hollow—and only exacerbated his already acute feelings of anxiety and depression. He often felt too decimated, both physically and mentally, to spend quality time with his wife and four-year-old son.

Unable to control what was happening in his body and discouraged by conventional treatments, Dan began to ponder the things he could control about his situation—namely his mental state—and started looking into options. The literature he found examining the correlation between improved mental health and psilocybin, the psychoactive compound in magic mushrooms, intrigued him, and his experiments with psychedelics over the next six months would significantly reduce the mental dread consuming his life.

Tonic

Tags: Disease, Drugs, Environment, Health, Life Expectancy, Medicine, Mental Health, Nature, Opinion, Treatment

Permalink

02-Apr-2019


Psychology Explains 10 Ways To Let Go of Worry 

 

Stress can be debilitating, but it doesn’t have to be. We all deal with stressful situations in life, but some of us know the secret to overcoming these struggles. As you learn how to let go of these stressful moments and feelings, you’ll be able to live life to the fullest.

HOW TO LET GO OF WORRYING
It’s impossible to eliminate all stress from our lives, but we can all do a better job of learning how to manage stress and handle our own fears.

If you’re ready to learn how to let go of your anxiety, keep reading.

1. IDENTIFY THE CAUSE
Figuring out why you’re worried is the first part of letting go of your anxiety.

Power of Pos

Tags: Advice, Anxiety, Education, Environment, Mental Health, Opinion, Psychology, Support, Treatment

Permalink

30-Mar-2019


How to get in a good mood in just 12 minutes 

 

Maybe that whole “self-care movement” was just a bunch of empty hype.

When we’re feeling blue, wellness gurus so often advise doing “something for yourself” — like taking a relaxing trip, going shopping or sipping bubbly at a spa. But researchers at Iowa State University suggest that being kind to others for just 12 minutes may do more to make ourselves feel better.

“Walking around and offering kindness to others in the world reduces anxiety and increases happiness and feelings of social connection,” says psychology professor Douglas Gentile, who worked on the new study appearing this week in the Journal of Happiness Studies.

NY Post

Tags: Happiness, Mental Health, Opinion, Treatment

Permalink

29-Mar-2019


Addiction and Recovery: When Your Parents are the Problem 

 

I was 13.

My mother seated us in the back so that we could read and fidget without distracting the others. We weren’t the only kids there, but there weren’t many of us. We didn’t have family to watch us, and looking back, I realize how hard my mother must have worked to heal — while raising children. But it didn’t always work so well, sadly, as we were put into foster care later on.

The AA meetings we attended were usually pretty full. It was humbling to see so many men and women admit their weaknesses; it was heartbreaking to know that some people wouldn’t make it back.

The Good Men Project

Tags: Addiction, Children, Environment, Family, Health, Mental Health, Opinion, Parental Burden, Support, Survival, Youth

Permalink

22-Mar-2019


Having one mental health disorder increases your risks of getting another 
 

New studies reveal that most psychiatric illnesses are related to one another. Tracing these connections, like the mapping of a river system, promises to help define the main cause of these disorders and the drugs that could alleviate their symptoms.

The Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register is an enormous treasure trove of clinical data documenting every hospitalization for mental illness in Denmark over the course of 16 years.

In a recent study published in January 2019, Oleguer Plana-Ripoll from Aarhus University in Denmark and his colleagues analyzed records from close to six million Danes. They found that being affected with one mental disorder increased the risk of developing another — pointing to their possible relatedness.

For example, when young women were diagnosed with a mood disorder such as depression before age 20, they had a high risk of developing another disorder such as obsessive-compulsive disorder within the next five years.

The Conversation

Tags: Mental Health, Opinion, Study, Treatment, World

Permalink

22-Mar-2019


Giving Parents Therapy Can Help Their Anxious Children 

 

On March 13, the New York Times’s Upshot published results from a survey on parenting that found that moms and dads are still very involved in aspects of their grown children’s lives.

76 percent of parents “reminded their adult children of deadlines they need to meet, including for schoolwork,” 74 percent “made appointments for them, including doctor’s appointments, 15 percent “called or texted to make sure they did not sleep through a class or test,” while 14 percent “told them which career to pursue.” This kind of parenting can backfire, the article wrote, “by leaving young adults ill-prepared for independent adult life.”

Tonic

Tags: Anxiety, Children, Environment, Mental Health, Opinion, Parental Burden, Parenting, Study, Therapy, Treatment, Youth

Permalink

15-Mar-2019


Your Environment Is Cleaner. Your Immune System Has Never Been So Unprepared. 

 

Should you pick your nose?

Don’t laugh. Scientifically, it’s an interesting question.

Should your children pick their noses? Should your children eat dirt? Maybe: Your body needs to know what immune challenges lurk in the immediate environment.

Should you use antibacterial soap or hand sanitizers? No. Are we taking too many antibiotics? Yes.

“I tell people, when they drop food on the floor, please pick it up and eat it,” said Dr. Meg Lemon, a dermatologist in Denver who treats people with allergies and autoimmune disorders.

NY Times

Tags: Allergy, Environment, Health, History, Music, Opinion, Science, Study

Permalink

15-Mar-2019


I’ve Talked With Teenage Boys About Sexual Assault for 20 Years. This Is What They Still Don’t Know

 

I thought I understood rape. It happened to me when I was 13 years old. I assumed my job was to model survivorship, and to show readers how to speak up after being abused, molested or attacked. I thought I was supposed to talk to the girls.

But I have also seen something that, at first, surprised me: The boys want to talk, too. Some want a private conversation; others ask bold questions in front of their classmates.

Time

Tags: Education, Environment, Opinion, Parental Burden, Relationships, Respect, Safety, Sex, Support, Youth

Permalink

15-Jan-2019


Travel Channel Chef Faces Backlash for Comment About Midwest Chinese Restaurants 

 

Travel Channel host Andrew Zimmern is under fire for for saying that Chinese food in the Midwest is served in “horseshit restaurants.”

Zimmern, a well-known TV chef, travels around the world trying strange food for his show Bizarre Foods. Zimmern also hosts The Zimmern List.

Time

Tags: Business, Celebrity, Chef, Food, History, Opinion, Restaurant

Permalink

29-Dec-2018


Scathing Report Accuses the Pentagon of Developing an Agricultural Bioweapon 

 

A new technology in which insects are used to genetically modify crops could be converted into a dangerous, and possibly illegal, bioweapon, alleges a Science Policy Forum report released today. Naturally, the organization leading the research says it’s doing nothing of the sort.

The report is a response to a ongoing research program funded by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Dubbed “Insect Allies,” the idea is to create more resilient crops to help farmers deal with climate change, drought, frost, floods, salinity, and disease. But instead of modifying seeds in a lab, farmers would send fleets of insects into their crops, where the genetically modified bugs would do their work, “infecting” the plants with a special virus that passes along the new resilience genes.

Gizmodo

Tags: Abuse, Chemicals, Children, Disease, Ecology, Insects, Nature, Opinion, Population, Program, Safety, Science, Self Interest, Survival, Terraforming, World

Permalink

05-Oct-2018


Monogamy May Be Even More Difficult For Women Than it Is For Men 

 

It’s a widely held belief that monogamy comes more naturally to women than it does to men. A lot of people subscribe to a narrative that says the sexes are just “wired” differently, with women having evolved to be monogamous and men to be promiscuous.

There’s just one problem with this line of thinking—it’s not true, according author Wednesday Martin’s latest book. In UNTRUE: Why Nearly Everything We Believe About Women, Lust, and Infidelity is Wrong and How the New Science Can Set Us Free , Martin offers a provocative read based on the latest research studies and interviews with experts in human sexuality that challenges us to think differently about women and sex. She sets the record straight on a number of false beliefs about female sexuality in particular, including when and why women cheat.

Tonic

Tags: Cheating, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Health, Inclusion, Interview, Misrepresentation, Opinion, Sex, Woman's Rights, Women

Permalink

19-Sep-2018




Next Page