Errattic

Home About Us All Fuctasia_(NSFW) Games Gay+ Health/Food Movies Music Musings Photos_(NSFW) TV Wisps Preferences

Home Page > Current Page


Top Tags

Abuse
Action
Advice
All Rights
Americans
Art
Backlash
Bullying
Business
Celebration
Celebrity
Children
Choices
Comedy
Coming Out
Community
Court
Crime
Daddy Squish
Dance
Dedication
Discrimination
Disease
Education
Employment
Entertainment
Environment
Exclusivity
Family
Fear
Finance
Funny
Gay
Gay Rights
Govt
Hairy
Hate
Health
History
Homophobia
Horror
Hostility
Hot Swatch
Hypocrisy
Ignorance
Inclusion
Interview
Investigation
Justice
Laws
Lifestyle
Magic Splatter
Mass Appeal
Mat
Mental Health
Music
New World Order
Opinion
Parental Burden
Parenting
Perception
Political
Politics
Portrait
Pride
Privilege
Protest
Racism
Reckless
Relationships
Religion
Representation
Respect
Romance
Sad
Safety
Science
Self Interest
Service
Sex
Social Media
Sports
Stepping Up
Study
Support
Sweet
Tats
Threat
Toxic
Travel
Treatment
Tribute
Unity
Video
Violence
Weird
Woman's Rights
Women
World
Youth


Login

Create Profile
Login


This site does not claim credit for images, videos, or music, except where noted.


©2019 Errattic.com

Restricted to Adults
This site does not claim credit for images, videos, or music, except where noted.


Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Family'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Should I Intervene With a Kid Who Says He Is Depressed? 

 

Dear Care and Feeding,

My 11-year-old son has been friends with “Paul” for more than two years. During that time, Paul has been suspended from school multiple times for his language (he drops the F-bomb constantly, has called his teacher the B-word, etc.) and disruptive behavior. He’s known to deliver very colorful commentary on how he sees the world, shouting out some particularly interesting bits at times. Nevertheless, Paul is a smart and sensitive kid, and I am rooting for him. We all are.

The reason I’m writing is because Paul recently told my son that he sneaks and drinks his mother’s vodka when he’s feeling depressed, which is “most of the time,” in his words. He has mentioned those feelings before, and I’m also aware that telling tall tales is part of his swagger. For the most part, we take them in stride, but the combination of the alleged drinking and depression made me pause. I’m honestly not sure if Paul is just trying to look cool or if he’s trying to ask for help.

My plan, which I shared with my son, is to wait and see if Paul ever talks to me about these issues, and to then talk to a grown-up who has some oversight in his life, i.e., the school principal or his teacher. I wonder if I’m doing enough or if I should do more, though I’m not even sure what that would entail, as a conversation with his parents seems impossible—they are not at all approachable. Am I just sticking my nose in where it doesn’t belong? Your thoughts are appreciated.

—All Eyes on Paul

Slate

Tags: Advice, Children, Family, Mental Health, Parental Burden, Responsibility, Safety, Stepping Up, Treatment, Unruly Child

Permalink

21-Aug-2019


The doctor will accuse you now 

 

A recent essay in Time Magazine called for a massive expansion of the nanny state through mandatory medical screening of children for signs of child abuse. The proposal, which is based on the assumption that racial bias is causing doctors to miss some cases of abuse, would strip doctors of the ability to apply reasoned, clinical judgment to cases and would require them to subject children to a battery of x-rays whenever bruising or other marks are noticed. Proponents of the plan — not its opponents, mind you — have given it the appropriately dystopian moniker, “think less, screen more.”

Perhaps as shocking as the plan itself is how nonchalant the essay’s authors, Dr. Richard Klasco and Dr. Daniel Lindberg, are about the life-altering consequences of their proposal. In an apparent attempt to downplay the harm that their plan will cause, Klasco and Lindberg wrongly suggest that the worst that will happen if they get their way is “some non-abused children will be screened, and some non-abusive parents will be offended.”

The Hill

Tags: Abuse, Children, Employment, Family, Health, Interference, Medical, Parental Burden, Policy, Privacy, Safety, Service, Threat

Permalink

16-Aug-2019


Back Off, Mom
My mom thinks she’ll help care for my first child, but she couldn’t be more wrong. How do I make this clear? 
 

Dear Care and Feeding,

My husband and I want to have our first kid soon. Before we start trying, we need to figure out how to handle my mother.

We aren’t close at all. I maintain a polite relationship with her to minimize guilt trips and dramatics that arise when I keep the much-greater distance I would prefer. She’s learned that there will probably be a kid eventually, and she’s become obsessed with moving near me and being “Grandma’s Babysitting Service.” I’ve tried telling her that wouldn’t work for us, but she says, “You have no idea how hard it will be, especially after the second” or “Why have babies if you’re going to dump them at some day care?” or “You can’t afford good child care.”

We can afford day care, and while it’s expensive, more importantly, it’s not my mother. She was a big believer in corporal punishment and severe “Tiger Mom” parenting methods. I would never leave a kid with her unattended for even a few minutes.

We have major differences in values, and she thinks it’s her responsibility that her grandchildren participate in her religion (she embraces its most judgmental and hateful aspects), which is unacceptable to my husband and me. I don’t want her “help” raising my child, and I don’t want to deal with her guilt trips, unsolicited advice, and other intrusions into the happy and stable life I’ve built for myself.

She claims all her friends live near their grandbabies and take care of them when the parents have to go to work, and that it’s not fair that she might not get to do the same. She has started looking at homes in our area (where she knows no one but us), and, as she can’t afford to live in the city, she’s started telling us to move to the suburbs and get a house with enough room for her to live with us. This is not happening. Is there a way to handle this short of full estrangement while she’s living in a fantasy world and not my metro area?

Slate

Dad murdered autistic sons by driving off pier: prosecutors

Tags: $, Advice, Children, Death, Family, Hate, Insurance, Mental Health, Murder, Parental Burden, Parental Crime, Protections, Safety, Seniors, Treatment

Permalink

18-Jul-2019


Children Cannot Parent Other Children 

 

A fundamental truth about children is that they have needs they cannot themselves fulfill. They need people who acquire and prepare food for them, and people who look out for their safety and cleanliness. Beyond those material needs, they also need people who care for them emotionally, tending to them when they are sick and supporting them through tough times. Normally these duties fall to parents, but they can also fall to relatives, family friends, babysitters, teachers, or social workers. At the border, in detention centers, they are falling to other detained children, a harrowing detail in a sea of harrowing details now being reported.

Lawyers who visited a border station in Clint, Texas, this week told the Associated Press that during their visit, they encountered small children who had been taken from their parents under the Trump administration’s family-separation policy, some of them infants and toddlers, who are receiving little time or attention from adult caregivers or supervisors. Instead, some detained children receive affection and care—such as being held, rocked, bathed, fed, and even changed—only from other, slightly older detained children. As the AP reported Saturday:

The Atlantic

Tags: Children, Environment, Family, Immigration, Inhumanity, Mental Health, Nature, Parental Burden, Policy, Politics, Protections, Psychology, Reckless, Responsibility, Safety

Permalink

26-Jun-2019


The Unwritten Sex Rule My Husband and I Have: Once a Week Is Good 

 

Sex once a week — this is the unwritten and unsaid rule my husband and I have stood by pretty much since the "I've gotta have you right now" phase fizzled. And let's be honest, that fire often dwindles after those first few years of newlywed bliss and comes dangerously close to being put out altogether when you have kids. But as long as you make an effort, a flame will always be there — sometimes small, sometimes big. For my husband and I, that effort happens once a week. And after talking with many of my friends about this unwritten sex rule, it turns out we're not alone.

Popsugar

Tags: Children, Choices, Dedication, Environment, Family, Intimacy, Lifestyle, Marriage, Portrait, Relationships, Sex

Permalink

07-Jun-2019


Bullying, sexual assault led to student's suicide after school staff didn't intervene: Lawsuit 

 

A New York City high schooler who took her own life after she was allegedly bullied and forced to perform sexual acts on other students had experienced the abuse since she began attending the school, and school staff knew about it but did not intervene, a lawsuit by the girl's parents alleges.

Mya Vizcarrondo-Rios jumped 34 stories from the roof of her apartment building with her backpack still on shortly after 2 p.m. on Feb. 28, 2018, and was pronounced dead at the hospital about an hour later. She was 15 years old.

ABC News

Emaciated 12-Year-Old Boy Was Shackled In Bathtub With Dog Shock Collar On Before His Death, Investigators Say

Body believed to be missing 5-year-old Utah girl found hours after uncle is charged with murder: Police

New York man accused of killing daughter-in-law added to FBI's 10 Most Wanted

Tags: Abuse, Arrest, Bullying, Children, Court, Education, Environment, Family, Hate, Health, Inhumanity, Mental Health, Murder, Parental Burden, Parental Crime, Punishment, Reckless, Safety, Suicide, Treatment, Violence, Warning, Woman's Rights, Youth

Permalink

30-May-2019


I Was Raised by a Dad With Bipolar Disorder, and Here's What I Want Other Parents to Know 

 

There were a lot of ups and downs growing up with my father. There was the side of my dad that was so full of life. He'd be the center of attention, throwing huge get-togethers at our house and chatting energetically with everyone around him, including his kids. I remember how easily he made people laugh and put them at ease.

Then there was the side of my dad that drove me and my friends to a nearby theme park, quickly became annoyed with everything we said or did, and then fell asleep on a park bench for three hours. On vacations, he would shift from enjoying himself to disappearing from us for long periods at a time. More commonly, he struggled to focus during conversations with his family or his work clients.

Even with my dad's happier moods, there were so many moments, days, months, even years of pain that consumed my childhood. There were a lot of times he was unbearable to be around. I often chose not to invite friends over, afraid he'd have an episode while they were there. As a young girl and even throughout my teenage years, it was really hard to witness my dad's severe mood swings. When he was hyper and joyful, it was contagious — but when his mood changed, I took it so personally, truly feeling as though I must have done or said something to make him act that way.

Popsugar

Tags: Environment, Family, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Portrait, Relationships, Responsibility, Treatment

Permalink

20-May-2019


The Brewing Backlash Against Hustle Culture and Its Effects on Our Mental Health 

 

Signs you need to reprioritize

We’ve been taught that working hard is a good thing — so how do we know when it becomes a problem? According to Dion Metzger, M.D., a psychiatrist in Atlanta, it’s all about balance, and you have to pay attention to your proverbial scale. “We’re all trying to balance work, relationships, and health. You will know your hustle is tipping the scale when it starts taking away from the other two. You are sleeping less, eating unhealthily, or cancelling plans with loved ones. This is when you draw the line,” she tells Thrive. “Your scale is no longer balanced. This is the time when you need to step back from the hustle and recalibrate. Balance prevents burnout.”

Thrive Global

How To Get More Comfortable Talking About Your Mental Health

When Mental Illness Is Your Family Heirloom

Why Latinx People Need Better Mental Health Support

Using An Out Of Office To Deal With Email Expectations Was An Unexpected Act Of Self-Care

Tags: Awareness, Business, Employment, Environment, Family, Finance, Health, Heritage, History, Mental Health, Nature, Portrait, Recovery, Relationships, Science, Study, Treatment

Permalink

16-May-2019


Being too hard on yourself could lead to these debilitating disorders 

 

Do you feel like the fate of the world rests on your shoulders? As well as being stressful, that mindset may be affecting your mental health. A sense of over-responsibility is one trait that makes people vulnerable to developing obsessive-compulsive disorder or anxiety, according to a study published in the International Journal of Cognitive Therapy.

While it’s normal to feel anxious, and also to act in ways that one might casually describe as OCD – such as keeping your house spotlessly clean – it’s when these behaviors become persistent and intense that they develop from traits into disorders, researchers say.

The Ladders

How to support a partner who's experiencing mental health issues

Guest opinion: Our legislators must understand mental health better

How flying into an angry rage is a sign you could be seriously ill

Feel Like Your Antidepressants Stopped Working? Here’s What Could Be Happening.

Having Psoriasis May Increase The Risk Of Mental Health Disorders, New Research Shows

I started being as nice to myself as I am to my friends and it did absolute wonders for my mental health

City life damages mental health in ways we’re just starting to understand

FHE Health Announces Scholarships To Encourage More People To Enter The Addiction And Mental Health Field

Tags: Aging, Anger, Awareness, Disease, Drugs, Education, Employment, Family, Finance, Govt, Insurance, Mental Health, Psychology, Relationships, Scholarship, Study, Support, Survival, Training, Treatment

Permalink

13-May-2019


I had to "break up" with my therapist because finding effective mental health care isn't easy 

 

When an acquaintance offered to pay for my therapy, I was so grateful for the opportunity to get the help I needed. But, after just three sessions, I had to call it quits.

A lot had happened before I started my search for therapy. In 2015, I failed to secure a visa that would have allowed me to work at possibly one of the most highly-reputed companies in Africa. When I first received the job offer, I thought that, finally, I had achieved some semblance of comforting stability in my life. Achieving permanent employment had been a rollercoaster ride—but my whole life has been a rollercoaster ride. Often, it has been one with more downs than ups after surviving sexual abuse, emotional abuse, a dysfunctional family, and financial challenges. It’s been overwhelming, for me and for my loved ones caught in the ride.

So you can imagine how relieved I felt when I got the job because I could finally fend for myself. You can probably also imagine how I felt when my application for a work visa was denied.

Hello Giggles

Nothing Comes Before My Mental Health: 5 Lessons I Learned After Treatment

Tidying Up: What Cleanliness Says About Your Mental Health

Arianna Huffington: It’s Time to Prioritize Our Mental Health in Our Everyday Lives

Tags: Clean, Environment, Family, Instructional, Judgment, Mental Health, Portrait, Privilege, Race, Recovery, Relationships, Respect, Superficiality, Therapy, Treatment, Women

Permalink

03-May-2019


'Children welcome - as long as they stay seated, don't cry, eat off plastic plates and don't go to the toilet on their own': Restaurant's forbidding list of rules for customers with young ones sparks online anger 

 

A restaurant has ordered parents to keep their children quiet at all times or they will be asked to leave.

The list of rules for diners at the Mediterranean restaurant in Llandudno, North Wales, also says youngsters must be 'seated at all times', accompanied to the toilet and eat off plastic plates.

The business scores four out of five stars on TripAdvisor, and ranked as one of the five best in the area.

It was posted online by charity worker Helen Hyland, reports The Sun, 52, from Stirling, Scotland, who was on holiday in the Welsh resort.

Daily Mail

Tags: Backlash, Children, Environment, Family, Finance, Food, Parental Burden, Policy, Protections, Restaurant, Safety, Social Media, World

Permalink

23-Apr-2019


Ask Amy: Recovering mom doesn't want dog at home 

 

Dear Amy: For the past 2 ½ years my son (now 9) has been asking for a dog. I’ve been saying no because while I like dogs, I prefer them in other people’s houses.

I didn’t want to take on the considerable expense and care for a dog.

Four months ago, I had a brain aneurysm. Thankfully, I am OK and recovering. However, during my recovery in the hospital I thought I was dying and that it would be a good idea for my son to have a dog to love and care for in the event that I did die.

I was coming off of anesthesia and on a lot of pain medication. I feel confident in saying that at the time, I was not in my right mind.

Chicago Tribune

UK pet owner investigated after dog kills 9-year-old boy

Tags: Advice, Animals, Attack, Children, Choices, Death, Environment, Family, Health, Mental Health, Nature, Parental Burden, Parenting, Pets, Violence

Permalink

14-Apr-2019


THE HIDDEN STIGMA IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY 

 

Whether it was Slavery, Jim Crow, The Crack Epidemic, or Mass Incarceration, the suffering that Black people endured seems to have been never-ending. With that being said, the trauma that many of us have faced since the beginning of modern western civilization takes its toll on one’s mental health.

The stigma of dealing with the continuous cycle of the demonization of addressing one’s mental health in the Black community is one that prevents those seeking help to enhance their lives and, in some cases, to save them. Toxic masculinity is another contribution to this stigma as Black children, especially little boys, are told that expressing any sort of emotion is a sign of weakness. This conditioning can harbor psychological health issues for years to come.

According to the US HHS Office of Minority Health, adult African-Americans are 20% more likely to state that they are suffering from psychological distress than their adult white counterparts. This is due to less than 2% of the American Psychological Association being African-American, which leads many African-Americans to distrust mental health care practitioners to help them with their issues.

discovergrey

Tags: Brain, Choices, Disease, Education, Environment, Family, Health, Lifestyle, Perception, Relationships, Respect, Safety, Support, Treatment

Permalink

01-Apr-2019


Instagram Influencer Mom Leaves Kids and Husband in Coach While She Flies First Class 

 

This Instagram influencer mom is not afraid to leave her family in the back of the plane while she flies first class.

Naomi Isted, a fashion blogger and TV presenter from Essex, U.K., who has 94,400 followers on Instagram, told INSIDER that she travels every six weeks on average for work, and if she’s booked in an economy seat, she’ll always “try to upgrade if there’s scope to do so.”

However, if her children are traveling with her, she will upgrade alone because she believes that, at ages 3 and 9 years old, they’re too young too appreciate the amenities of first class.

“I never personally experienced business or first until I was presenting a wine TV show in my 20s,” Isted, 40, told INSIDER, adding that a person shouldn’t fly first class until they are old enough to “appreciate and understand the value of money and hard work.”

People

Tags: Employment, Environment, Family, Finance, Lifestyle, Parenting, Privilege, Self Interest, Social Media, Travel, Treatment, Weird, Women

Permalink

31-Mar-2019


Parkland Students Share Mental Health Resources to Support Each Other 

 

After two Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School students died by apparent suicides in the span of just a week, current and former students at the school are calling on the Parkland community to support its young people with mental health services. On social media, survivors are reminding us of the supports available when you're having a hard time.

Anti-gun violence activist David Hogg, who graduated from Stoneman Douglas in 2018, took to Twitter in the wake of his classmates' deaths, saying that the trauma endured after a mass shooting doesn't fade quickly.

"Stop saying you’ll get over it,'" he wrote. "You don’t get over something that never should have happened because those that die from gun violence are stolen from us not naturally lost. Trauma and loss don’t just go away, you have to learn to live with it through getting support."

TeenVogue

Father of Sandy Hook School Shooting Victim Found Dead in Apparent Suicide

The warning signs of suicide – and how to get help

Tags: Death, Environment, Family, Mental Health, Parental Burden, Recovery, Suicide, Support, Survival, Therapy, Treatment, Violence, Youth

Permalink

25-Mar-2019




Next Page