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Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Perception'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Do you wear contact lenses? You should switch to glasses to stop spreading the virus 

 

Focus on this, contact lens wearers of the world: To reduce the spread of the pandemic virus that causes Covid-19, experts suggest it's time to put your contact lenses on the shelf and dazzle the world with your frames.

That's because wearing glasses can help you stop touching your face, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, a key way any virus is spread, including the novel coronavirus currently spreading across the world.

Why contact lens?

Contact lens users not only touch their eyes to put in and remove their lens twice or more a day, they also touch their eyes and face much more than people who don't wear contacts, said Dr. Thomas Steinemann, a clinical spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

"You touch your eye and then you touch another part of your body," said Steinemann, an ophthalmologist at MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio.

CNN

Tags: Awareness, Contact Lens, Contamination, Coronavirus, Etiquette, Glasses, Health, Perception, Responsibility, Safety, Science, Vulnerable, Warning

Permalink

27-Mar-2020


The coronavirus did not escape from a lab. Here's how we know. 

 

As the novel coronavirus causing COVID-19 spreads across the globe, with cases surpassing 284,000 worldwide today (March 20), misinformation is spreading almost as fast.

One persistent myth is that this virus, called SARS-CoV-2, was made by scientists and escaped from a lab in Wuhan, China, where the outbreak began.

Here's why: SARS-CoV-2 is very closely related to the virus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), which fanned across the globe nearly 20 years ago. Scientists have studied how SARS-CoV differs from SARS-CoV-2 — with several key letter changes in the genetic code. Yet in computer simulations, the mutations in SARS-CoV-2 don't seem to work very well at helping the virus bind to human cells. If scientists had deliberately engineered this virus, they wouldn't have chosen mutations that computer models suggest won't work. But it turns out, nature is smarter than scientists, and the novel coronavirus found a way to mutate that was better — and completely different— from anything scientists could have created, the study found.

Live Science

Tags: Animals, Awareness, Coronavirus, Discovery, Environment, Perception, Science, Study

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22-Mar-2020


Why outbreaks like coronavirus spread exponentially, and
how to “flatten the curve” 
 

After the first case of covid-19, the disease caused by the new strain of coronavirus, was announced in the United States, reports of further infections trickled in slowly. Two months later, that trickle has turned into a steady current.

This so-called exponential curve has experts worried. If the number of cases were to continue to double every three days, there would be about a hundred million cases in the United States by May.

That is math, not prophecy. The spread can be slowed, public health professionals say, if people practice “social distancing” by avoiding public spaces and generally limiting their movement.

Still, without any measures to slow it down, covid-19 will continue to spread exponentially for months. To understand why, it is instructive to simulate the spread of a fake disease through a population.

Washington Post

Tags: Charts & Grafts, Contagion, Coronavirus, Discovery, Environment, Etiquette, Health, Lifestyle, Outbreak, Perception, Safety, Survival

Permalink

16-Mar-2020


Margaret Court’s Church Reckons “The Blood Of Jesus” Will Protect Them From Coronavirus 
 

This week in ‘Good Ideas’, sub-category ‘What Could Possibly Go Wrong?’, Margaret Court and her congregation have declared that they are safe from the coronavirus pandemic because the blood of Jesus will protect them.

The Victory Life Church released a statement to followers yesterday, saying that daily prayers and additional hand sanitiser are the only measures they’ll take to combat the rapidly-spreading disease.

Pedestrian

Tags: Activism, Contagion, Coronavirus, Disease, Exclusivity, Fighting Back, Health, Investment, Judgment, Lifestyle, Magic Splatter, Perception, Politics, Preference, Religion, Responsibility, Safety, Superficiality, Unruly Child

Permalink

13-Mar-2020


My Date Blocked Me After We Had Sex. I’m Afraid It Was Assault. 

 

Dear How to Do It,

A few months ago, I went on a date with a guy I met online. He was really sweet overall, but I didn’t find myself very romantically attracted to him, and I was also put off by some comments he made about some other members of the LGBTQ community (we’re both cis gay men). He continued to bring up the possibility of a relationship between us, however, and I equivocated on it because I wasn’t wholly against a relationship but wasn’t head over heels for him.

We got food and watched the sunset, and eventually we wound up making out, and I proposed we have sex. He said yes, but quickly withdrew and began talking about some of his past sexual trauma. I immediately stopped everything and asked if he was all right, and he said yes and that he wanted to continue. I asked if he was sure, and he said yes, and then we engaged in mutual masturbation and mutual oral sex in his car. It was good, though not the best sex of my life, and we both came in the end.

On the way back to my apartment, he asked again about having a relationship and if I only agreed to the date in order to hook up. I said I didn’t want to immediately go into anything, but that I’d be open to more dates and getting to know him better, and that my motivation to go on this date was more than just hooking up. He said OK, and we parted ways. I wake up the next morning to find he’s blocked me across every form of communication that we had each other on.

I’m really worried that something went wrong, and that I sexually assaulted him or generally engaged in sexual misconduct, but didn’t realize in the moment or somehow subconsciously denied to myself that he wasn’t consenting to what we did. It truly did seem to me like he was willing to do what we did, and that I communicated I did not want to have any sexual contact with him that he didn’t agree to. I’ve been wanting to reach out to him through Instagram (I have an account he didn’t know about) to try and understand what happened, but I don’t want to annoy, retraumatize, or hurt him. What should I do?

—Blocked

Slate

Tags: Advice, Community, Dating, Environment, LGBTQ, Mental Health, Perception, Relationships, Safety, Sex, Support

Permalink

12-Mar-2020


Here's What Delusional Disorder Is, According to a Psychiatrist 

 

As far as mental illness goes, psychotic disorders are some of the more severe mental disorders—two main symptoms of which often include delusions and hallucinations, according to the US National Library of Medicine's resource MedlinePlus.

Delusions in particular are defined as false beliefs, and are often grouped into the subsections of bizarre delusions (delusions that are not plausible, like believing your organs are in the wrong places within your body), and nonbizarre delusions (delusions that are possible, but not probable, like believing a stranger is in love with you).

Health

Tags: Awareness, Brain, Development, Mental Health, Perception, Psychology, Safety, Support

Permalink

10-Mar-2020


No Gifts, Please!
Am I a jerk to boycott presents at kid birthday parties? 
 

Our 5-year-old daughter gets invited to so many birthday parties. It started out as just good friends, but now in pre-K, she’s invited to all of her classmates’ parties.

Over the past few years, we’ve gone through some financial struggles and also receive too much stuff from family, so I made a rule to not give (or ask for) gifts. For birthdays, we host big parties because they’re fun, but we always explicitly request no presents. This year, we had some new attendees (classmates) whose parents we had never met and insisted on bringing something. One mom pushed for things my daughter likes, so I suggested art supplies (crayons are cheap! We’ll use them!). Instead she came with what looked like $25-plus worth of gifts!

Recently I attended a friend’s son’s party and, per my rule, didn’t bring a gift. The birthday boy asked, “Where’s the gift you brought?” and I said, “Well, we didn’t bring one.” He asked why not. I felt like such a jerk—I don’t want to have a threshold of how well we know a kid to get them a gift, and I don’t want to give everyone terrible, cheapie gifts (they should be thoughtful if anything!). I don’t have the time or money to be giving gifts to all kids! Am I being a jerk for not bringing gifts at all? Is a handmade card enough?

—We All Have Enough Crap

Slate

Tags: Advice, Exploration, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Parenting, Perception, Portrait, Sex, Support

Permalink

12-Feb-2020


There's nothing wrong with having 'casual sex' 

 

How much you revere the opinions of a priest rather depends on how ecclesiastical your upbringing was, but even the staunchest of heathens would concede that the UK’s most famous fictional man of the cloth might be worth listening to. A priest speaking out against the term “casual sex”, championing the cause of random hook-ups and no-strings flings, might sound unlikely. But this is no ordinary clergyman: I’m talking of course about actor Andrew Scott – now forever monikered “Hot Priest” whether he likes it or not – following his role in the second series of Fleabag.

We battle daily for and against the labels that aim to either protect or condemn us. It’s testimony to the power of words and the evolution of language that we’re still sensitive to how they’re applied to us. In an interview on a podcast, a now dog collar-free Scott reasoned, “The idea that you can’t extract any kind of meaning from casual sex... I think that’s really dangerous, because it invokes shame in people.” As he pointed out, casual does not necessarily translate as worthless. “You learn from people. It’s not about the length of time you spend with somebody.”

GQ

Tags: Mental Health, Perception, Sex

Permalink

05-Feb-2020


Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome 

 

Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome: America's Legacy of Enduring Injury and Healing (PTSS) is a 2005 theoretical work by Joy DeGruy (née Leary).[1][2] PTSS describes a set of behaviors, beliefs and actions associated with or, related to multi-generational trauma experienced by African Americans that include but are not limited to undiagnosed and untreated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in enslaved Africans and their descendants.[1]

PTSS posits that centuries of slavery in the United States, followed by systemic and structural racism and oppression, including lynching, Jim Crow laws, and unwarranted mass incarceration, have resulted in multigenerational maladaptive behaviors, which originated as survival strategies. The syndrome continues because children whose parents suffer from PTSS are often indoctrinated into the same behaviors, long after the behaviors have lost their contextual effectiveness.

DeGruy states that PTSS is not a disorder that can simply be treated and remedied clinically but rather also requires profound social change in individuals, as well as in institutions that continue to reify inequality and injustice toward the descendants of enslaved Africans.

DeGruy holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Communication, a master's degree in Social Work, a master's degree in Clinical Psychology, and a Ph.D. in Social Work Research. She teaches social work at Portland State University and gives lectures on PTSS nationally and internationally.

Wiki

What is 'Post-traumatic slave syndrome'?

Tags: All Rights, Books, Environment, History, Opinion, Perception, Psychology, Race, Study, Treatment, World, Writing

Permalink

27-Jan-2020


I Can’t Stop Cheating On My Wife 

 

Dear Prudence,

I’m a man in my mid-30s with a beautiful wife. We’ve been married for 15 years and had a great kid very early on in our relationship. We both have great careers, nice friends, a very kinky and active sex life. Others generally look at us with admiration and envy. My problem is that I became a serial cheater around eight years ago. I analyzed quite a lot why I feel the need to cheat (sex with my wife is definitely better than with other women) and think that I like the challenge of “conquering” and later the romantic aspects of it. My affairs usually last a few months. I’m also very open with my relationship status (and my unwillingness to change it) to my affair partners. I even developed great friendships with two last affair partners, and the whole experience has generally been extremely enriching and positive for me.

I never fell in love with another woman, and I want to stay with my wife forever, but I can’t seem, and also don’t want, to stop seeing other women. My job involves a lot of travel, so it’s easy to get away with cheating without arousing suspicion. In the beginning I didn’t really think too hard about it, but going forward I want to be “square and fair.” My wife doesn’t have the slightest idea of my cheating and would obviously be devastated if she found out.

A year or so ago I started talking about opening up our relationship as a way to slowly “legalize” my behavior. While she isn’t totally against the idea, it’s more something she can imagine in a distant future and in a very controlled setting. I reckon that the romantic aspects and durations of my affairs would be serious no-gos for her. While the easy answer would be “stop before you blow up your perfect life,” I feel like I’m not really able to. What are your thoughts?

—Can’t Stop Won’t Stop

Slate

Tags: Advice, Cheating, Etiquette, LGBTQ, Lifestyle, Marriage, Perception, Sex

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25-Jan-2020


Why woke diets featuring superfoods such as avocado and advocated by the likes of Ella Woodward are leading to a surge of distressing gut problems 

 

The woman, in her mid-30s, looked pretty healthy, which, undoubtedly, was her goal. Sitting in my clinic – I’m a dietician at a busy London hospital – we began discussing her daily food and drink regime.

Work was busy and stressful, so there wasn’t much time for breakfast, apart from some fruit or a green juice. Lunch was a salad brimming with chickpeas and roasted vegetables and topped with a sprinkling of antioxidant-rich seeds.

Yet more vegetables and maybe some ‘plant protein’ – beans and nuts – for dinner. She tries to limit her dairy intake, choosing lattes made with almond or soya milk.

And yet, here she was, almost doubled over with gut pain, complaining of bloating, cramps and other more embarrassing, and distressing, digestive complaints.

‘I never touch junk food,’ she added, hopefully.

At this point, I know I’m going to have to break some bad news. She may think her diet is exemplary but, in fact, it’s the cause of her problems.

I call it ‘woke’ or overzealous healthy eating – consuming vast quantities of so-called ‘clean’ ingredients while avoiding entire food groups such as dairy, carbohydrates or meat for health or ‘ethical’ reasons.

And I believe this kind of trendy eating is behind a surge in cases of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) that I, and my colleagues, have been seeing.

Daily Mail

Tags: Addiction, Development, Diet, Environment, Health, Injury, Mental Health, Nature, Neglect, Perception, Psychology, Recovery, Safety, Science, Support

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25-Jan-2020


Two Houses Is Better Than a Divorce 

 

Getting married is like voluntarily committing oneself to ride a tandem bike forever with no real destination. When one person gets tired, the other has to pedal harder or the entire operation collapses, and most divorce proceedings are just both partners yelling that if the other had pedaled hard enough then the bike would still be moving. Perhaps the appeal of living apart together (LAT) is avoiding this pressure for married couples to constantly synch up and operate in tandem rather than operating as separate entities that come together when it suits. LAT seems like an ideal solution for many of the problems that arise over the course of a marriage, affording the opportunity to be responsible for one’s own bike without having any reason to critique anyone else’s peddling.

Jezebel

Tags: $, Cheating, Choices, Dedication, Environment, Marriage, Men, Nature, Opinion, Perception, Portrait, Relationships, Responsibility, Sex, Substitute, Treatment, Women

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19-Jan-2020


WHY ‘NO’ IS THE SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT WORD WHEN IT COMES TO DEALING WITH ANXIETY 

 

When it comes to quelling anxiety, ideas for different strategies abound; there are books, balms, blankets, and beyond. But according to Kristen Bell, an advocate for mental-health realness, one of the best, simplest, and most effective ways to self-soothe just requires two small letters. In her keynote speech at last week’s Mindbody Bold Conference, Bell shared that the power of saying no more often has been a saving grace to her as she navigates the struggles with anxiety and depression.

“I realized that my codependency was so crippling that I couldn’t say no to people,” she said. “So what I’ve been doing this month is practicing saying no to people in a very kind way.” But that certain doesn’t mean prioritizing boundaries and becoming a no person is an easy thing to do, especially for those who struggle with anxiety.

Well and Good

Tags: Advice, Anxiety, Fighting Back, Mental Health, Perception, Psychology, Survival

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23-Aug-2019


Why Drinking Water All Day Long Is Not the Best Way to Stay Hydrated 

 

Water is cheap and healthy. And drinking H2O is an effective way for most people to stay hydrated. The National Academy of Medicine recommends that adult women and men drink at least 91 and 125 ounces of water a day, respectively. (For context, one gallon is 128 fluid ounces.) But pounding large quantities of water morning, noon and night may not be the best or most efficient way to meet the body’s hydration requirements.

“If you’re drinking water and then, within two hours, your urine output is really high and [your urine] is clear, that means the water is not staying in well,” says David Nieman, a professor of public health at Appalachian State University and director of the Human Performance Lab at the North Carolina Research Campus. Nieman says plain water has a tendency to slip right through the human digestive system when not accompanied by food or nutrients. This is especially true when people drink large volumes of water on an empty stomach. “There’s no virtue to that kind of consumption,” he says.

Time

Tags: Awareness, Food, Health, Hydration, Perception, Science, Water

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09-Aug-2019


Playing video games does not make you a mass shooter, expert says 
 

During a speech on Monday addressing the recent mass shootings in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio, President Trump call for an end to — or substantial reduction of — the "glorification" of violence in "gruesome and grisly" video game culture. While some are quick to blame video games for real-life acts of violence, experts say there is no such link.

"When it comes to actual serious criminal violence, there's virtually no evidence that video games matter," James Ivory, professor and research director at Virginia Tech, told CBS News.

Ivory has researched the social and psychological dimensions of media, particularly the content and effects of video games. He says he's determined that a lot of things influence violent crime — but the media we consume is not one of them.

CBS News

Tags: Americans, Development, Environment, Guns, Murder, Parental Burden, Parental Crime, Perception, Safety, Study, Violence, Youth

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06-Aug-2019




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