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Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Perception'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Sunscreen doesn’t protect dark-skinned people from developing melanoma 

 

Melanoma is a potentially deadly form of skin cancer linked to overexposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun. Sunscreen can block UV rays and therefore reduce the risk of sun burns, which ultimately reduces the risk of developing melanoma. Thus, the promotion of sunscreen as an effective melanoma prevention strategy is a reasonable public health message.

While this may be true for light-skinned people, such as individuals of European descent, this is not the case for darker skinned people, or individuals of African descent.

qz

Sunscreen Ingredients Are Absorbed Into Your Blood. Here's What That Could Mean

Tags: Disease, Environment, Health, Nature, Perception, Race, Science, Skin, Study, Sun, Sunscreen, World

Permalink

16-May-2019


OUR REALITY COULD BE A “HOLOGRAM” CREATED BY QUANTUM PHYSICS 

 

Ever since Einstein posited that space and time were inextricably linked, scientists have wondered where the cosmic web called spacetime comes from.

Now, ongoing research in quantum physics may finally arrive at an explanation: A bizarre phenomenon called quantum entanglement could be the underlying basis for the four dimensions of space and time in which we all live, according to a deep dive by Knowable Magazine. In fact, in a mind-boggling twist, our reality could be a “hologram” of this quantum state.

Futurism

Tags: Discovery, Perception, Science, Study, World

Permalink

13-May-2019


HOMO ABSURDUS: WE NO LONGER DESERVE THE TITLE OF ‘WISE HUMAN’ HOMO SAPIENS 

 


Homo sapiens means wise human, but the name no longer suits us. As an evolutionary biologist who writes about Darwinian interpretations of human motivations and cultures, I propose that at some point we became what we are today: Homo absurdus, a human that spends its whole life trying to convince itself that its existence is not absurd.

As French philosopher Albert Camus put it: “Man is the only creature who refuses to be what he is.” Thanks to this entrenched absurdity, the 21st century is riding on a runaway train of converging catastrophes in the Anthropocene.

Discovery of self

The critical juncture in the lineage toward Homo absurdus was described by evolutionist Theodosius Dobzhansky: “A being who knows that he will die arose from ancestors who did not know.” But evolution at some point also built into this human mind a deeply ingrained sentiment—that one has not just a material life (the physical body), but also a distinct and separate mental life (the inner self).

Newsweek

Tags: Ecology, Education, Environment, History, Humanity, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Nature, Opinion, Perception, Psychology, Science, Survival, World

Permalink

06-May-2019


AirPods Are a Tragedy 

 

Future Relics is a column about the objects that our society is currently making, and how they may explain our lives to future generations. In each article, we'll focus on one item that could conceivably be discovered by someone 1,000 years from now, and try to explain where this item came from, where it's going, and what its existence explains about our current moment.

AirPods are a product of the past.

They're plastic, made of some combination of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, and sulfur. They’re tungsten, tin, tantalum, lithium, and cobalt.

The particles that make up these elements were created 13.8 billion years ago, during the Big Bang. Humans extract these elements from the earth, heat them, refine them. As they work, humans breathe in airborne particles, which deposit in their lungs. The materials are shipped from places like Vietnam, South Africa, Kazakhstan, Peru, Mexico, Indonesia, and India, to factories in China. A literal city of workers creates four tiny computing chips and assembles them into a logic board. Sensors, microphones, grilles, and an antenna are glued together and packaged into a white, strange-looking plastic exoskeleton.

These are AirPods. They’re a collection of atoms born at the dawn of the universe, churned beneath the surface of the earth, and condensed in an anthropogenic parallel to the Big Crunch—a proposed version of the death of the universe where all matter shrinks and condenses together. Workers are paid unlivable wages in more than a dozen countries to make this product possible. Then it’s sold by Apple, the world’s first trillion-dollar company, for $159 USD.

Vice

Tags: Environment, Nature, Opinion, Perception, Privilege, Science, Tech, Waste, Writing

Permalink

06-May-2019


'Brady Bunch' Episode Fuels Campaigns Against Vaccines — And Marcia's Miffed 

 

As the number of measles cases nationwide rises to levels not seen since before the virus was declared eliminated in 2000, some people who oppose vaccines cite an odd cultural reference as evidence that the concern about measles is overblown: a 1969 episode of The Brady Bunch.

Some former Brady Bunch cast members aren't happy about it.

The episode "Is There a Doctor in the House?" features the whole family sick with measles. First, Peter gets sent home from school. Mother Carol Brady, played by Florence Henderson, describes his symptoms as "a slight temperature, a lot of dots and a great big smile," because he gets to stay home from school for a few days.

Once the rest of the six kids come down with measles, the youngest two Brady siblings fool around, with Bobby trying to color Cindy's measles spots green.

"If you have to get sick, sure can't beat the measles," sister Marcia says, as the older Bradys sit around a Monopoly board on one of the kid's beds. All the kids are thankful they don't have to take any medicine or, worse, get shots, the thought of which causes Jan to groan.

People who are critical of vaccines bring the episode up often. It's used in videos and memes and is cited by activists like Dr. Toni Bark, who testifies against vaccines in courts and at public hearings across the United States. To them, it aptly illustrates what they consider to be the harmlessness of the illness.

npr

Do You Really Think "The Brady Bunch" Was Real?

Tags: Disease, Environment, Health, Misrepresentation, Parental Burden, Perception, Safety, Saving The Environment!, Treatment, TV, Vaccine

Permalink

29-Apr-2019


This high school banned parents — yes, parents — from wearing leggings 

 

A Texas high school is facing backlash for instituting a restrictive dress code on parents, with critics of the new rules accusing the principal of racism and classism.

Parents of students at James Madison High School in Houston are barred from wearing leggings and hair bonnets when they enter the school.

“Parents, we do value you as a partner in your child’s education,” the school’s principal, Carlotta Outley Brown, said in a memo to her district, according to the Houston Chronicle. “However, please know we have to have standards, most of all we must have high standards.”

The “parent dress code” threatens to turn away parents who show up wearing certain restricted items, including bonnets, pajamas, hair rollers, “sagging pants,” and leggings — clothing more often worn by women. (It’s worth noting that the school is named for a U.S. president who definitely enjoyed wearing super-tight pants that would now be considered leggings.)

Vice

Tags: Education, Environment, Fashion, Parental Burden, Perception, Policy, Treatment

Permalink

25-Apr-2019


Airline Passenger Arrested After Confrontation With Crew Over Vomit In Daughter's Seat 

 

A Frontier Airlines passenger was removed from a flight and arrested following a confrontation with a flight attendant after she complained about vomit in her daughter's seat. A video was shared online Wednesday showing the incident that took place Saturday on the flight from Las Vegas to North Carolina.

Rosetta Swinney said her flight to Raleigh-Durham had already been delayed so staff could clean the plane but when she boarded the plane, she noticed her daughter’s seat was still dirty.

"She jumped up to say mom! ‘My hands are wet,’” Swinney told local media WTVD-TV. “She smelled it. She says 'this is vomit, mom.' So we went to look. It was on the bag, all over her shirt, her hands.”

The 53-year-old said she told the flight attendant about it but her requests were ignored following which she had a confrontation with the crew. Following the confrontation, the airline called authorities who handcuffed the woman. Swinney's 14-year-old daughter was heard crying in the video as she watched her mother getting arrested.

IBT

Tags: Arrest, Backlash, Children, Clean, Employment, Parental Burden, Perception, Protest, Safety, Travel, Treatment

Permalink

25-Apr-2019


The Risks of Getting a Tattoo Are Rare, But Real. Here's What to Know 

 

Nearly three in 10 Americans have a tattoo, yet ink is still somewhat stigmatized. Many job seekers and office workers hide their body art rather than risk disapproval from higher-ups.

Research also finds that tattoo stigma is widespread. A recent study, published in the journal Stigma and Health, found that when hypothetical patients with HIV or lung cancer had tattoos, others were more likely to blame them for their high health care costs compared to tattoo-free folks with the same illnesses. The study provides “initial evidence that tattooed individuals face health disparities,” the study authors write.

Tme

Tags: Employment, Environment, Health, Medical, Perception, Safety, Tats, Tech, Treatment

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14-Apr-2019


THE HIDDEN STIGMA IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY 

 

Whether it was Slavery, Jim Crow, The Crack Epidemic, or Mass Incarceration, the suffering that Black people endured seems to have been never-ending. With that being said, the trauma that many of us have faced since the beginning of modern western civilization takes its toll on one’s mental health.

The stigma of dealing with the continuous cycle of the demonization of addressing one’s mental health in the Black community is one that prevents those seeking help to enhance their lives and, in some cases, to save them. Toxic masculinity is another contribution to this stigma as Black children, especially little boys, are told that expressing any sort of emotion is a sign of weakness. This conditioning can harbor psychological health issues for years to come.

According to the US HHS Office of Minority Health, adult African-Americans are 20% more likely to state that they are suffering from psychological distress than their adult white counterparts. This is due to less than 2% of the American Psychological Association being African-American, which leads many African-Americans to distrust mental health care practitioners to help them with their issues.

discovergrey

Tags: Brain, Choices, Disease, Education, Environment, Family, Health, Lifestyle, Perception, Relationships, Respect, Safety, Support, Treatment

Permalink

01-Apr-2019


Being Black in a White Academic World 

 

While Operation Varsity Blues uncovered the most explicit example of rich people buying their children’s future, the scandal has sparked a larger conversation on the ways in which elite college admissions have always been tilted toward people like those charged: rich, white parents who, should their children still not measure up despite a childhood of private test-prep tutors and expensive extracurriculars, have the means to buy their way onto Ivy League campuses with a hefty donation or to influence their way in through family legacy.

Meanwhile on these same campuses, low-income students and students of color are assumed to be there only because of affirmative action. In other words, to not deserve their spot. Below is an edited and condensed conversation between Slate editorial assistant Rachelle Hampton (Northwestern Class of 2017), New York Times writers Aisha Harris (Northwestern, 2009) and Jamelle Bouie (University of Virginia, 2009), and Slate parenting columnist and podcaster Carvell Wallace (NYU, 1997) on what it’s like to navigate these primarily white academic spaces when your presence there is assumed to be unearned.

Slate

Tags: Education, Finance, Inclusion, Interview, Perception, Privilege, Program, Treatment, Youth

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21-Mar-2019


The argument against having close friends at work 

 

Given the amount of time we spend at work, relationships are bound to form.

And that's a good thing. Having friends at work can increase job satisfaction, performance and productivity, research shows.

But you might want to avoid becoming too close with your colleagues.

"You don't need to be best buds," said Amy Cooper Hakim, an industrial-organizational psychology practitioner and workplace expert. "You want to be kind, professional and nice. But we don't need to tell every person at work our deep dark secrets, and long-term goals and dreams."

CNN

Tags: Business, Employment, Environment, Perception, Relationships

Permalink

06-Nov-2018


Can coffee really sober you up? 

 

You're out late at night and you've had one too many drinks. You're feeling a bit inebriated, and you're wondering if a cup of coffee can help. Many of us have been there.

Well, here's the lowdown: While a cup of joe or shot of espresso can help to perk you up, it's not going to help sober you up. In fact, in some situations, the combination of caffeine and alcohol could be potentially harmful.

"I call it the 'perfect storm,' " said Dr. Mary Claire O'Brien, senior associate dean for health care education at the Wake Forest School of Medicine, who has researched the interactions between caffeine and alcohol, including its effects on injury risk.

CNN

Tags: Drink, Drugs, Health, Perception, Safety, Science

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26-Oct-2018


Experts Explain Why LGBTQ People Have More Eating Disorders 

 

While the National Eating Disorder Association reports that the LGBTQ community is disproportionately plagued by eating disorders, experts are saying that being a minority contributes to this dilemma.

Dr. Norman H. Kim, national director for program development at Reasons Eating Disorder Center, believes that queer people are drawn to unhealthy eating habits because of minority stress. Behaviors such as binging, purging, and undereating are a symptom of chronic social stress LGBTQ people experience as minorities, he told Stylecaster.

The rates at which queer people are having this reaction to being otherized are alarming.

Advocate

Tags: Abuse, Aging, Choices, Dating, Diet, Discrimination, Disease, Environment, Exclusivity, Fear, Food, GLBT, Hate, Health, Hostility, Judgment, Lifestyle, Medical, Mental Health, Perception, Politics, Portrait, Poverty, Relationships, Science, Sex, Social Media, Survival, Treatment, Waste

Permalink

26-Sep-2018


Study: A Daily Baby Aspirin Has No Benefit For Healthy Older People 

 

Many healthy Americans take a baby aspirin every day to reduce their risk of having a heart attack, getting cancer and even possibly dementia. But is it really a good idea?

Results released Sunday from a major study of low-dose aspirin contain a disappointing answer for older, otherwise healthy people.

"We found there was no discernible benefit of aspirin on prolonging independent, healthy life for the elderly," says Anne Murray, a geriatrician and epidemiologist at Hennepin Healthcare in Minneapolis, who helped lead the study.

npr

New study raises questions about daily aspirin therapy for healthy seniors

Tags: Aging, Disease, Drugs, Environment, Health, Life Expectancy, Medical, Perception, Safety, Science, Study, Survival, Treatment

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17-Sep-2018


98.6 DEGREES IS A NORMAL BODY TEMPERATURE, RIGHT? NOT QUITE 

 

YOU WAKE UP at 6 am feeling achy and chilled. Unsure if you’re sick or just sleep-deprived, you reach for a thermometer. It beeps at 99°F, so you groan and roll out of bed and get ready for work. Because that’s not a fever. Is it?

Yes, it is. Forget everything you know about normal body temperature and fever, starting with 98.6. That’s an antiquated number based on a flawed study from 1868 (yes, 150 years ago). The facts about fever are a lot more complicated.

Wired

Tags: Environment, Health, Medical, Nature, Perception, Science, Tech

Permalink

07-Sep-2018




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