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Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Mental Health'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

India's Monkeys Keep Killing People, so Scientists Are Trying Radical New Sterilization Strategies 

 

One evening last November, a young woman named Neha was feeding her infant son inside their house in Runkata, a small town in the outskirts of Agra, India. Suddenly, a monkey broke into the house, snatched the baby boy from her arms, and made away with him. Neighbors chased the unexpected kidnapper with stones, but to their horror, the baby was soon found lying blood-soaked on a nearby terrace. Despite being rushed to the hospital, Arush, who was just 12 days old, did not survive. Perhaps this sounds like a freak tragedy, a rare case of a wild animal behaving outside its natural order, but truthfully, there was nothing especially rare about this incident.

Gizmodo

Man commits suicide after his service dog is killed by alligator

Tags: Animals, Attack, Death, Environment, Mental Health, Nature, Overpopulation, Pets, Suicide, Terraforming, Violence, World

Permalink

25-May-2019


Women are happier without children or a spouse, says happiness expert 

 

We may have suspected it already, but now the science backs it up: unmarried and childless women are the happiest subgroup in the population. And they are more likely to live longer than their married and child-rearing peers, according to a leading expert in happiness.

Speaking at the Hay festival on Saturday, Paul Dolan, a professor of behavioural science at the London School of Economics, said the latest evidence showed that the traditional markers used to measure success did not correlate with happiness – particularly marriage and raising children.

“Married people are happier than other population subgroups, but only when their spouse is in the room when they’re asked how happy they are. When the spouse is not present: fucking miserable,” he said.

The Guardian

Tags: Children, Environment, Happiness, Health, Life Expectancy, Mental Health, Responsibility, Woman's Rights

Permalink

25-May-2019


What's Your Purpose? Finding A Sense Of Meaning In Life Is Linked To Health 

 

Having a purpose in life may decrease your risk of dying early, according to a study published Friday.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 7,000 American adults between the ages of 51 and 61 who filled out psychological questionnaires on the relationship between mortality and life purpose.

What they found shocked them, according to Celeste Leigh Pearce, one of the authors of the study published in JAMA Current Open.

People who didn't have a strong life purpose — which was defined as "a self-organizing life aim that stimulates goals" — were more likely to die than those who did, and specifically more likely to die of cardiovascular diseases.

npr

Tags: Aging, Dedication, Environment, Happiness, Health, Life Expectancy, Mental Health, Nature, Poll, Seniors

Permalink

25-May-2019


Wendy’s employee takes bath in kitchen sink, restaurant still passes inspection 

 

This doesn’t count as washing your hands before returning to work.

An employee at a Wendy’s in Florida brought his home hygiene routine to the fast food restaurant, washing up in an industrial sink, a revolting viral video shows.

The 93-second footage, posted Tuesday on Facebook, shows a Snapchat video of a shirtless young man without shoes or socks climbing into an oversize sink in the Milton restaurant’s kitchen.

“I don’t suggest anyone eating at the Milton wendy’s again,” a caption accompanying the video read, complete with several vomiting emojis.

NY Post

Tags: Business, Clean, Employment, Environment, Germs, Health, Hostility, Mental Health, Reckless, Restaurant, Safety, Social Media

Permalink

24-May-2019


From the Straight Spouse’s Perspective of a Gay Man Having an Affair 

 

My husband is having an affair with a man. We have four young children. He moved out quickly after I discovered the relationship. I am worried about him and I don’t know how to make this better for him and for us. His kids miss him. I honestly thought we had a happy and loving marriage. Do you have any advice for me? Or for him?

Thank you for sending your question, and I’ve written a lot about how the gay spouse proceeds through this process. I only occasionally hear from women or men who have been left behind. So in this response, I’m going to focus on you and them.

The Good Men Project

Tags: Advice, All Rights, Children, Choices, Gay, Lifestyle, Marriage, Mental Health, Parental Burden, Support, Therapy, Treatment

Permalink

24-May-2019


Should you text with your boss? 

 

Having your phone blow up with texts from your boss is enough to get your heart racing.

Text messages tend to carry a heavier sense of urgency than an email or instant message -- whether that's the intent or not.

While you might be comfortable texting in your personal life, not everyone is open to using it for workplace communications.

Managers and their employees should set expectations of how they prefer to communicate in and out of the office. Some workers might find texting easier than emails or phone calls, while others might find it too invasive.
People are sloppier and lazier when it comes to texting"

"Have a conversation to determine preferences and reach an agreement on when you are going to use what form of communication," said Marie McIntyre, a career coach and author of "Secrets to Winning at Office Politics."

CNN

Tags: Advice, Business, Employment, Environment, Mental Health, Policy, Privacy, Protection, Safety, Treatment

Permalink

24-May-2019


The Shame-Free Guide to Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder 

 

Sexual desire is a largely misunderstood aspect of our sexual health. It’s stigmatized and pathologized on both ends: whether you have no appetite or an extremely high desire to have sex, it’s seen as problematic. All of that can make it feel really overwhelming to reach out for help when something might actually be out alignment with your libido. Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is a persistent or recurring lack of sexual fantasies and appetite for sex which is causing the patient distress and can’t be accounted for as a symptom of another illness.

It can be difficult to diagnose HSDD as there is no baseline “norm” for sexual desire across the spectrum — you have to feel out where your level of desire feels nourishing. Everyone is different when it comes to how they experience sexual desire and it’s perfectly normal for your libido to ebb and flow throughout your life. Juliet Widoff, an OBGYN at Callen-Lorde, says screenings for HSDD should happen regularly, as “it is a disorder that can cause a significant amount of personal and interpersonal distress and, because there is a great deal of shame and stigma surrounding it, patients may not be forthcoming regarding their symptoms.”

Allure

Tags: Education, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Nature, Science, Sex, Study, Therapy, Training, Treatment

Permalink

23-May-2019


What Is Usually the Root Cause of Mental Illness? 

 

Is mental illness just an outcome (not sure if that's the right word) of mental and emotional insecurities? originally appeared on Quora, the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world. You can follow Quora on Twitter, Facebook, and Google Plus.

There is no one cause of mental illness. Some seem to have a strong genetic component, such as Schizophrenia, and others appear to be the obvious result of an exposure to environmental trauma, such as a soldier’s PTSD, with everything in between these two extremes.

Here are some of the main variables that combine to determine the likelihood that someone will develop a diagnosable mental disorder:

Genetics

Apple News

Child sexual abuse victims — mental health support is critical

WHY QUITTING SEX COULD BE THE ANSWER TO EMOTIONAL WELLNESS

Tags: Abuse, Celibacy, Children, Environment, Mental Health, Parental Burden, Religion, Science, Sex, Study, Youth

Permalink

22-May-2019


Broken Leg Syndrome: Why Don’t We Take Meds for Our Mental Health? 

 

For twenty-five years, I’ve had to work through anxiety, depression and all sorts of mental health stuff. What have I learned?

You need the right team to stay healthy. And just like any illness, it will likely start with some sort of medical intervention. But many times, people turn up their nose at the idea of taking medication for mental health.

Then, I ask what happens if you break a leg. This is what I use to help people understand why therapy and meds are often the first line of defense for mental health.

So, let’s say you break your leg.

What’s your first move?

A. Go vegan

B. Walk it off

C. Pray over it

D. Go to the hospital and get it set in a cast.

The answer, of course, is D. You can pray over it too. But what’s the first step? A broken leg is a trauma—treat it as such.

The Root

Tags: Medicine, Mental Health, Portrait, Race, Recovery, Treatment

Permalink

21-May-2019


Experts Say Long-Lasting Couples Always Do These 8 Things Together 

 

When you see couples who have been together for years and are still happily in love, you may ask yourself what do they know that everyone else doesn't. The truth is, maintaining a long-lasting relationship isn't easy. Not everyone can do it. But if you want your relationship to last, there are a few key things you and your partner need to do.


First off, it's important to remember that relationships take work. As sex and relationship therapist, Cyndi Darnell tells Bustle, couples who last recognize that relationships are living things that need nourishment. "Relationships are not static monoliths," she says. "Just like a plant or a pet, living things need sustenance to survive. Love alone is not enough, especially when there's no identifiable expression of it on a regular basis."

Long-lasting couples not only love each other, but they also do things each day to show their love. Showing your partner that you care doesn't require anything special or out of the ordinary. It can be as simple as doing a thoughtful act of service or really listening when they have something important to say.

Bustle

Tags: Dating, Environment, List, Mental Health, Relationships, Treatment, World

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20-May-2019


I Was Raised by a Dad With Bipolar Disorder, and Here's What I Want Other Parents to Know 

 

There were a lot of ups and downs growing up with my father. There was the side of my dad that was so full of life. He'd be the center of attention, throwing huge get-togethers at our house and chatting energetically with everyone around him, including his kids. I remember how easily he made people laugh and put them at ease.

Then there was the side of my dad that drove me and my friends to a nearby theme park, quickly became annoyed with everything we said or did, and then fell asleep on a park bench for three hours. On vacations, he would shift from enjoying himself to disappearing from us for long periods at a time. More commonly, he struggled to focus during conversations with his family or his work clients.

Even with my dad's happier moods, there were so many moments, days, months, even years of pain that consumed my childhood. There were a lot of times he was unbearable to be around. I often chose not to invite friends over, afraid he'd have an episode while they were there. As a young girl and even throughout my teenage years, it was really hard to witness my dad's severe mood swings. When he was hyper and joyful, it was contagious — but when his mood changed, I took it so personally, truly feeling as though I must have done or said something to make him act that way.

Popsugar

Tags: Environment, Family, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Portrait, Relationships, Responsibility, Treatment

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20-May-2019


Suicide Rate For Girls Has Been Rising Faster Than For Boys, Study Finds 

 

The number of people dying by suicide in the U.S. has been rising, and a new study shows that the suicide rate among young teenage girls has been increasing faster than it has for boys of the same age.

Boys are still more likely to take their own lives. But the study published Friday in JAMA Network Open finds that girls are steadily narrowing that gap.

Researchers examined more than 85,000 youth suicides that occurred between 1975 and 2016. Donna Ruch, a researcher at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, who worked on the study, tells NPR that a major shift occurred after 2007.

Researchers found the increase was highest for girls ages 10 to 14, rising by nearly 13% since 2007. While for boys of the same age, it rose by 7%.

"That's where we saw the most significant narrowing of the gender gap," Ruch says.

npr

Tags: Children, Environment, Heritage, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Psychology, Study, Suicide, Support, Treatment, Youth

Permalink

17-May-2019


The Brewing Backlash Against Hustle Culture and Its Effects on Our Mental Health 

 

Signs you need to reprioritize

We’ve been taught that working hard is a good thing — so how do we know when it becomes a problem? According to Dion Metzger, M.D., a psychiatrist in Atlanta, it’s all about balance, and you have to pay attention to your proverbial scale. “We’re all trying to balance work, relationships, and health. You will know your hustle is tipping the scale when it starts taking away from the other two. You are sleeping less, eating unhealthily, or cancelling plans with loved ones. This is when you draw the line,” she tells Thrive. “Your scale is no longer balanced. This is the time when you need to step back from the hustle and recalibrate. Balance prevents burnout.”

Thrive Global

How To Get More Comfortable Talking About Your Mental Health

When Mental Illness Is Your Family Heirloom

Why Latinx People Need Better Mental Health Support

Using An Out Of Office To Deal With Email Expectations Was An Unexpected Act Of Self-Care

Tags: Awareness, Business, Employment, Environment, Family, Finance, Health, Heritage, History, Mental Health, Nature, Portrait, Recovery, Relationships, Science, Study, Treatment

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16-May-2019


To The Left! How To Tell When You’ve Reached A Relationship Dead End 

 

Have you been dating someone for a while and, even though you both agreed to be exclusive or continue out your “situationship,” you feel like everything just flatlined? You wonder, “should I keep trying or is time to cut your losses?”

Here are 7 things to consider to help you decide whether it’s worth sticking it out or if it’s time to move on

1. Your Time Isn’t Being Valued

Essence

Tags: Advice, All Rights, Choices, Dating, List, Mental Health, Recovery, Relationships, Tips, Treatment

Permalink

16-May-2019


These are the best — and worst — states in the U.S. 
 

U.S. News & World Report released its third annual list of the best and worst states in America to live in, based on "thousands of data points to measure how well states are performing for their citizens," according to the rankings. And the winners and losers of 2019 may catch some by surprise.


Washington state takes the No. 1 spot, followed by New Hampshire and Minnesota taking home the bronze. The states achieved their high rankings by doing well in eight categories: Health care, education, a state's economy, infrastructure, the opportunity the state affords its residents, the fiscal stability of state government, crime and corrections and natural environment.

Some categories of measurement were given more "weight" in the rankings, based on a survey of what matters the most to citizens, according to the site. Health care and education were weighted the highest, followed by state economies, infrastructure and the opportunity states offer their citizens.

CBS News

Tags: Americans, Environment, Finance, Health, List, Mental Health, Protection, Study, Travel

Permalink

15-May-2019




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