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Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Travel'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Counties Most At-Risk For Measles Outbreaks Span Across The Country, According To This Eye-Opening Map 

 

At least 10 measles outbreaks have erupted across the United States in 2019, prompting discussions regarding the importance of vaccinations. This pressing topic resurfaced again when, on Tuesday, May 9, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Johns Hopkins University highlighted the counties most at-risk for measles outbreaks via an eye-opening map. The data-driven graphic reiterates the documented relationship between low-vaccination areas and outbreaks, proving once again that vaccinations are key in preventing the spread of this infectious disease.

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Johns Hopkins University recently teamed up to identify the top counties at-risk for measles outbreaks, using a risk-analysis model that examined international travel and vaccination rates. The results, published in the The Lancet Infectious Diseases, found that areas with high international travel and low-vaccination rates are hotspots for measles outbreaks.

Romper

Who's behind measles vaccines misinformation?...

Tags: Contagion, Disease, Environment, Health, Investigation, Misrepresentation, Nature, Parental Burden, Protection, Reckless, Religion, Safety, Travel, Treatment, Vaccine, Video

Permalink

17-May-2019


PILOT CLAIMS SENIOR AIRLINE INSTRUCTOR HARASSED HER BY ASKING 'INAPPROPRIATE QUESTIONS' 

 

Air India is reportedly investigating after a pilot accused one of the airline's senior captains of sexually harassing her during and after a training session.

A spokesperson for the airline told The Khaleej Times that the pilot, a woman, had filed a sexual harassment complaint accusing the male senior captain, who had been leading the training session, of asking her inappropriate questions.

In her complaint, the pilot reportedly alleged that the senior captain, "suggested the two...have dinner at a city restaurant in Hyderabad on May 5 after the training session was over."

The pilot said she initially accepted the invitation "as I had done a few flights with him and he seemed decent."

However, when the two arrived at the restaurant that day, the pilot wrote, "this is where my ordeal started."

"He started with telling me how depressed and unhappy he was in his married life," the pilot said.

Newsweek

Tags: Employment, Safety, Sexual Harassment, Travel, Treatment, Woman's Rights, World

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16-May-2019


These are the best — and worst — states in the U.S. 
 

U.S. News & World Report released its third annual list of the best and worst states in America to live in, based on "thousands of data points to measure how well states are performing for their citizens," according to the rankings. And the winners and losers of 2019 may catch some by surprise.


Washington state takes the No. 1 spot, followed by New Hampshire and Minnesota taking home the bronze. The states achieved their high rankings by doing well in eight categories: Health care, education, a state's economy, infrastructure, the opportunity the state affords its residents, the fiscal stability of state government, crime and corrections and natural environment.

Some categories of measurement were given more "weight" in the rankings, based on a survey of what matters the most to citizens, according to the site. Health care and education were weighted the highest, followed by state economies, infrastructure and the opportunity states offer their citizens.

CBS News

Tags: Americans, Environment, Finance, Health, List, Mental Health, Protection, Study, Travel

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15-May-2019


Group ranks best and worst countries in Europe for LGBTI rights 

 

Azerbaijan, Turkey and Armenia are the worst countries in Europe for LGBTI rights, according to a new assessment from the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association.

Malta, Belgium and Luxembourg come in at the top of the list of 49 nations ranked according to legal and policy practices for LGBTI people, according to a news release from advocacy group ILGA-Europe. LGBTI is an abbreviation for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex.

CNN

Tags: All Rights, Environment, Laws, LGBTQ, Politics, Protections, Safety, Study, Support, Travel, World

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14-May-2019


The Best and Worst Airlines and Airports of 2019 

 

Had a bad experience at Newark Liberty Airport last year? You’re not alone, according to recent rankings.

The New Jersey hub ranked as the worst U.S. airport in the 2019 annual ratings from AirHelp, an organization that specializes in air traveler rights and seeks compensation in cases of delays or cancellations. See last year’s rankings here.

U.S. airports in general didn’t fare particularly well, with the highest-rated Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport taking 34th place of 132 around the world. Newark held the lowest U.S. spot, at 116. A major reason is weather-related delays, says Henrik Zillmer, AirHelp’s chief executive officer; they are a huge problem for American airports, compared with European ones.

Bloomberg

Tags: Business, Environment, Finance, List, Study, Travel, World

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09-May-2019


Flight Attendant Spills Hot Tea On Passenger, Hawaiian Airlines Sued 

 

A lawsuit has been filed against Hawaiian Airlines by an Australian woman, who claimed she sustained scars after a flight attendant knocked a cup of hot tea on her lap.

Dimity Plaister, 47, from the Gold Coast, Brisbane, was flying from her hometown to Honolulu, in April 2017, when the incident allegedly occurred. According to court documents obtained by News.com, a crew member on the flight accidentally knocked a cardboard cup of black tea, which was on the plaintiff’s food tray, while passing a carton of milk to her co-passenger. The cup of scalding tea landed on Plaister’s lap, drenching her clothes and burning her skin.

“As a result of the incident, the applicant suffered burns to her hip, thigh and buttocks as well as psychological injury,” the statement of claim read.

She was “not offered medical treatment or assistance by cabin crew to dry her lap or ease her pain,” even after she had alerted in-flight crew of the incident, Plaister claimed.

IBT

Tags: Accident, Court, Environment, Finance, Health, Injury, Safety, Travel

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02-May-2019


Electric scooter use results in 20 injuries per 100,000 trips, CDC finds 

 

People are getting injured while riding electric scooters. This shouldn’t come as a huge shock to anyone who has noticed the explosion of dockless, shareable two-wheelers over the last year and a half. But the degree to which people are breaking bones and sustaining head injuries is alarming public health officials who released a major study into scooter-related injuries on Thursday.

The study, which was conducted by the Public Health and Transportation departments in Austin, Texas, in association with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), identified a total of 271 people with potential scooter-related injuries from September 5th through November 30th, 2018. The study was presented by the CDC at its Epidemic Intelligence Service conference in Atlanta.

ALMOST HALF OF THE INJURED RIDERS SUSTAINED HEAD INJURIES

During the study period, there were a total of 182,333 hours of e-scooter use, 891,121 miles ridden on e-scooters, and 936,110 e-scooter trips. The research team calculated that there were 20 individuals injured per 100,000 e-scooter trips taken during the three-month period.

The Verge

Tags: Accident, Auto, Injury, Safety, Travel, Warning

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02-May-2019


Amputee who says United Airlines took his scooter battery takes battle to court 

 

A 68-year-old man with amputations says a United Airlines employee left him crawling on the floor during a vacation after a security agent stopped him from taking his scooter’s batteries onto a flight.

Now, the Canadian man will ask a judge next week for the nation’s human rights commission to hear his case.

"Having to crawl across the floor in front of my wife is the most humiliating thing that I can think of," the man, Stearn Hodge, told the CBC, calling it “pathetic.”

Stearn told the network the incident occurred two years ago, in February 2017, when he and his wife arrived at Calgary International Airport for a flight to Tulsa, Oklahoma. Before boarding, a security agent asked Hodge to remove the $2,000 lithium battery needed to power his scooter, according to the CBC.

Hodge called for an agent from United Airlines, he said, noting the airline had approved the batteries in an earlier phone call. But the United employee agreed with the agent from the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority, the CBC reported.

USA Today

Tags: All Rights, Disabled, Finance, Health, Hostility, Inclusion, Lifestyle, Reckless, Safety, Seniors, Support, Travel, Treatment

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01-May-2019


Airline Passenger Arrested After Confrontation With Crew Over Vomit In Daughter's Seat 

 

A Frontier Airlines passenger was removed from a flight and arrested following a confrontation with a flight attendant after she complained about vomit in her daughter's seat. A video was shared online Wednesday showing the incident that took place Saturday on the flight from Las Vegas to North Carolina.

Rosetta Swinney said her flight to Raleigh-Durham had already been delayed so staff could clean the plane but when she boarded the plane, she noticed her daughter’s seat was still dirty.

"She jumped up to say mom! ‘My hands are wet,’” Swinney told local media WTVD-TV. “She smelled it. She says 'this is vomit, mom.' So we went to look. It was on the bag, all over her shirt, her hands.”

The 53-year-old said she told the flight attendant about it but her requests were ignored following which she had a confrontation with the crew. Following the confrontation, the airline called authorities who handcuffed the woman. Swinney's 14-year-old daughter was heard crying in the video as she watched her mother getting arrested.

IBT

Tags: Arrest, Backlash, Children, Clean, Employment, Parental Burden, Perception, Protest, Safety, Travel, Treatment

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25-Apr-2019


United Airlines CEO: By the time you sit on our planes, 'you're just pissed at the world' 

 

United Airlines CEO Oscar Munoz acknowledged key pain points customers face when traveling today, including airlines' increasingly shrinking seat sizes.

"I think we are nearing a point certainly that we can't do that anymore," Munoz told ABC News. The interview was conducted prior to the U.S. grounding of the Boeing 737 Max.

He said that air travel used to be a thrilling experience but has turned into a laborious process.

"It's become so stressful," he told the outlet, "from when you leave, wherever you live, to get into traffic, to find a parking spot, to get through security."

USA Today

Tags: Finance, Modernization, Policy, Travel

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25-Apr-2019


Teen Says Apple’s Facial Recognition Got Him Wrongfully Arrested 

 

Sounds About Right

A New York teen suing Apple for $1 billion claims its facial-recognition system falsely linked him to a series of thefts and caused him to be arrested for a crime he didn’t commit.

The twist: an Apple spokesperson told Gizmodo that such a facial recognition system doesn’t even exist. If Apple is telling the truth, it’s possible the lawsuit filed on Monday is based on mere speculation.

But even if that is the case, the suit still serves as evidence that American citizens find it easy to believe that one of the world’s biggest tech companies uses facial recognition to keep tabs on them.

Futurism

US AIRPORTS WILL SCAN 97% OF OUTBOUND FLYERS’ FACES WITHIN 4 YEARS

Tags: Arrest, Business, Court, Face Recognition, Finance, Privacy, Privilege, Program, Tech, Travel

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25-Apr-2019


United Airlines employee accused of directing racial slurs at passenger 
 

A United Airlines employee has been criminally charged and could be fired after she was accused of using racial slurs to scold a black passenger at Houston's airport, according to police.

Carmella Davano was cited for using profane and abusive language in a public place after Cacilie Hughes and witnesses told police that the United Airlines employee told her to "stop making monkey faces" and "stop making monkey shines," Houston Police spokesman Kese Smith said.

Witnesses also told police that Davano was saying she thought Hughes was on drugs, Smith said.

NBC News

Tags: All Rights, Discrimination, Employment, Environment, Hostility, Privilege, Racism, Respect, Travel, Treatment

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23-Apr-2019


Brunei Reminds Us of the Perils of LGBTQ Travel 

 

On April 3, 2019, Brunei implemented a strict policy which carries the death penalty by stoning for gay sex. The move comes as a result of Brunei’s Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah’s ongoing efforts to introduce a Sharia-based penal code to the Borneo nation.

While homosexuality was already criminalized in Brunei, the recent legislation entails increased punishments in the form of whippings and death by stoning. The strict law has sparked outrage across the globe, with the UN Human Commission condemning the new measures, claiming that they seriously breach international human rights law.

And we at misterb&b are now initiating a boycott and banning all hotels owned by the Sultan from our platform. As the world’s largest gay travel community operating in 135 countries, we are focused on helping the LGBTQ community feel welcome and travel safely with pride throughout the world. We know how important it is to be able to move about the world without fear of brutal retaliation.

Advocate

Tags: Hotel, LGBTQ, Safety, Travel, World

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09-Apr-2019


The reason you get sick after a flight isn't the dirty cabin air 

 

People often get sick after taking flights.

Cabin air is cleaner than you expect.

But there are plenty of germy places on planes.

Jet lag can also compromise your immune system.

For many, coming down with a cold after a long flight is all but inevitable.

But why is that? What do we get sick after taking a long flight?

The easy answer is that there are a couple of hundred people trapped in close proximity to one another inside a pressurized metal tube for hours on end, making for a rich breeding ground for germs.

Business Insider

Tags: Air, E. coli, Health, Illness, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Safety, Science, Travel, Treatment, World

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05-Apr-2019


SCIENTISTS SAY THEY CAN MAKE LIGHT TRAVEL 30X FASTER THAN NORMAL 

 

Scientists at the University of Central Florida say they’ve figured out how to make pulses of light travel 30 times as fast as usual — or even backward.

“We’re able to control the speed of the pulse by going into the pulse itself and reorganizing its energy such that its space and time degrees of freedom are mixed in with each other,” researcher Ayman Abouraddy said in a statement. “We’re very happy with these results, and we’re very hopeful it’s just the starting point of future research.”

Futurism

Tags: Discovery, Science, Travel, World

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04-Apr-2019




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