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Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Drugs'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Will There Ever Be a Cure for Addiction? 

 

From drinking hand-sanitizing gels to using synthetic marijuana, our society is constantly inventing new ways to get high. When one substance is banned, another quickly takes its place. What drives this never-ending hunt for the next high?

One important motivator is the pleasure principle. The quest for pleasure is a fundamental part of being human. It helps us meet our basic needs by pushing us to work towards specific goals.

Drugs provide an instant shortcut to our brain’s pleasure center. They flood our brains with dopamine and condition us to seek the next high. As a result, our bodies begin reducing their natural dopamine output. With repeated drug use, pleasure dissipates but the cravings remain. Thus, drugs hijack our natural drive for pleasure. Addicts pursue drugs despite the fact that the pleasure they experience from them progressively diminishes.

Psychology Today

Tags: Addiction, Alcohol, Disease, Drugs, Environment, Health, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Psychology, Science, Treatment

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16-Sep-2019


Humans Can Reverse Their Biological Age, Shows a 'Curious Case' Study 

 

In a small, 1-year clinical trial published Thursday in the journal Aging Cell, nine participants took three common medications — growth hormone and two diabetes drugs — and reversed their biological age by 2-and-a-half years on average. Greg Fahy, Ph.D., lead author of the study and chief science officer of anti-aging therapeutics company Intervene Immune, tells Inverse that this research proves the concept that biological aging may not be unstoppable.

“One of the lessons that we can draw from the study is that aging is not necessarily something that is beyond our control,” he says. “In fact it seems that aging is largely controlled by biological processes that we may be able to influence.”

Inverse

Tags: Aging, Drugs, Health, Medical, Options, Science, Study, Treatment

Permalink

08-Sep-2019


Teens are increasingly depressed, anxious, and suicidal. How can we help? 

 

Suicide rates lately have been increasing in all age groups in America, in almost every state. But the epidemic of youth suicide is particularly stymying, even for experts who study it.

There are plenty of hypotheses about what’s driving it floating around. They include the changing way teens interact with each other in digital spaces, economic stress and fallout from the 2008 recession, increasing social isolation, suicide contagion, and the fact that teens can more easily look up suicide methods online.

Two other enormous public health issues of our time are at play too. Children of opioid users appear to be more at risk for suicide. Same goes for young people who live in a house with a gun.

But the bottom line is that no one really knows why. That doesn’t mean more suicides can’t be prevented, however.

Vox

Tags: Anxiety, Drugs, Environment, Guns, Keep Abortion Legal, Parental Burden, Psychology, Responsibility, Social Media, Study, Suicide, Treatment, Warning, Youth

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12-Jul-2019


6 babies and 6 employees at a hospital have tested positive for a drug-resistant infection 

 

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Children's Hospital confirmed on Monday 12 cases of a drug-resistant staph infection in its neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), according to a statement from the hospital.

The six babies, including one who is potentially symptomatic, and six symptomatic employees who have tested positive for Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are being treated, UPMC said.

MRSA causes staph infections that are resistant to some antibiotics and therefore are difficult to treat. Though a common germ, staph can sometimes cause skin or wound infections, pneumonia, blood infections and in more extreme cases, sepsis or even death, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

CNN

Tags: Disease, Drugs, Environment, Health, Injury, Medical, Safety, Treatment, Warning

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02-Jul-2019


FIFTH OF YOUNG MEN WHO EXERCISE ENGAGE IN 'DISORDERED EATING' TO GAIN MUSCLE, STUDY FINDS 

 

A fifth of young men who exercise to gain muscle may be at risk of so-called muscularity-orientated disordered eating behaviours, a new research finds.

The study, conducted by researchers at the UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital in San Francisco, found that 22 per cent of males aged 18-24 who work out to bulk up exhibit these disordered eating behaviours.

Meanwhile, five per cent of women in the same age category show similar characteristics.

Independent

Tags: Diet, Disease, Drugs, Exercise, Health, Injury, Study, Training, Vitamins

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20-Jun-2019


Can I Use a Sick Day as a ‘Mental Health Day’? 

 

Rosenblatt is director of communications for Accessibility Partners, a small IT consulting firm. The company is so small that it doesn’t fall under the Americans with Disabilities Act, and it doesn’t have to follow the same federal rules with sick leave that large companies do.

However, her boss has been accommodating, allowing her time to attend therapy and psychiatric appointments, to deal with medication changes and even time in inpatient treatment.

That kind of treatment toward mental health might seem rare, but there’s evidence that it’s less taboo than it used to be.

The World Health Organization recently classified burnout as a diagnosable health condition.

According to an Australian study, one-third of workers have “faked an illness” to use a sick day for their mental health.

But 26 percent of employers have fired a worker for using a sick day for what they see as a “personal day.”

So deciding to take your sick day as a mental health day can be a tricky decision, especially if you’re worried your employer won’t see it as legitimate.

Mental health is a disability
Here’s the thing. Changes to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in 2008 expanded the definition of disability. This means that mental disorders like depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety and schizophrenia are protected.

So, if you’ve got a diagnosed mental disorder like about 44 million American adults, almost one in five people, you can’t be fired for asking for accommodations, such as the occasional mental health day.

Rewire

9 Surprising Changes That Occur In The Body When You Get Rejected

Hundreds weigh in on Chicago’s mental health crisis as city task force examines solutions

More Millennials Are Dying 'Deaths of Despair,' as Overdose and Suicide Rates Climb

Tags: All Rights, Brain, Business, Death, Drugs, Employment, Health, Mental Health, Overdose, Policy, Protections, Representation, Science, Sick Day, Study, Suicide, Support, Youth

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14-Jun-2019


Kids and teens are experiencing such severe side effects from weight loss and sexual function pills, they're ending up in the hospital 

 

Supplements send an estimated 23,000 people to the hospital each year in the United States, and a new study suggests children and young adults comprise a significant number of these visits. Even more alarming, supplements for weight loss, muscle gain, and sexual function were some of the biggest culprits for adolescent supplement-related hospitalizations, according to a new retrospective study in Journal of Adolescent Health.

Researchers looked at adverse event reports in a Food & Drug Administration (FDA) database that were filed between January 2005 and April 2005 and found 1,392 adverse event reports related to supplement use in young people (from babies to 25 year-olds).

The researchers zeroed in on 977 reports where a single supplement was deemed responsible for causing a person's hospital visit.

Business Insider

Tags: Abuse, Chemicals, Children, Choices, Damage, Drugs, FDA, Health, Medical, Parental Burden, Parental Crime, Safety, Vitamins, Youth

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11-Jun-2019


Here's exactly how restricting abortion harms public health 

 

This week, Alabama’s governor signed the most extreme anti-abortion bill in the country, effectively banning the procedure. It’s just one of a host of new laws restricting abortion: including one by the Missouri senate which passed a bill banning abortion after eight weeks, and one signed by the governor of Georgia banning abortion after six weeks, before most people would know that they’re pregnant.

Even though they’ve been signed by the governors, the Alabama and Georgia laws are not yet in effect—people can still get legal abortions in these states. And there is still a constitutional right to abortion in the United States. However, access to safe abortion varies widely across the country: Some states have laws that restrict the number of clinics that can provide abortion services, for example, or require people to wait a certain amount of time between a counseling appointment and the procedure, which is medically unnecessary. As these laws are challenged and the abortion conversation continues, it’s important to recognize that restricting abortion can have significant repercussions for people who can become pregnant.

Popular Science

'Every Pregnancy Is a Risk of Harm': How Criminalizing Miscarriage Could Play Out

Tags: Abortion, Alcohol, All Rights, Arrest, Drugs, Empathy, Health, Interference, Legal, Murder, Overpopulation, Parental Burden, Politics, Safety, Saving The Environment!, Sexual Harassment, Woman's Rights

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16-May-2019


Being too hard on yourself could lead to these debilitating disorders 

 

Do you feel like the fate of the world rests on your shoulders? As well as being stressful, that mindset may be affecting your mental health. A sense of over-responsibility is one trait that makes people vulnerable to developing obsessive-compulsive disorder or anxiety, according to a study published in the International Journal of Cognitive Therapy.

While it’s normal to feel anxious, and also to act in ways that one might casually describe as OCD – such as keeping your house spotlessly clean – it’s when these behaviors become persistent and intense that they develop from traits into disorders, researchers say.

The Ladders

How to support a partner who's experiencing mental health issues

Guest opinion: Our legislators must understand mental health better

How flying into an angry rage is a sign you could be seriously ill

Feel Like Your Antidepressants Stopped Working? Here’s What Could Be Happening.

Having Psoriasis May Increase The Risk Of Mental Health Disorders, New Research Shows

I started being as nice to myself as I am to my friends and it did absolute wonders for my mental health

City life damages mental health in ways we’re just starting to understand

FHE Health Announces Scholarships To Encourage More People To Enter The Addiction And Mental Health Field

Tags: Aging, Anger, Awareness, Disease, Drugs, Education, Employment, Family, Finance, Govt, Insurance, Mental Health, Psychology, Relationships, Scholarship, Study, Support, Survival, Training, Treatment

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13-May-2019


Low-dose aspirin linked to bleeding in the skull, new report says 

 

Taking low-dose aspirin to prevent heart disease and stroke is associated with an increased risk of bleeding in the skull in people without a history of those conditions, according to a new report.

Researchers analyzed data from 13 previous studies in which over 130,000 people ages 42 to 74, who didn't have a history of heart disease or stroke, were given either low-dose aspirin or a placebo for the prevention of these conditions.
An aspirin is typically defined as low-dose if it is between 75 and 100 milligrams, but most over-the-counter pills are around 81 milligrams.

CNN

Tags: Awareness, Brain, Drugs, Health, Injury, Medical, Safety, Science

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13-May-2019


New Study Finds 73% of Independent Musicians Suffer From Symptoms of Mental Illness 

 

Digital distribution platform Record Union, which conducted the survery, has committed to donating $30,000 to projects supporting struggling artists.
Nearly three-quarters of independent musicians have experienced “stress, anxiety and/or depression” in relation to their work, a new study has found.

The results, which were published on April 30, are based on a web survey of nearly 1,500 independent musicians by Swedish-based digital distribution platform Record Union between March 21 and April 2. The survey found 73% of the population had faced negative mental health issues, with anxiety and depression topping the list of symptoms. Among those aged 18-25, the numbers are even worse, with 80% of respondents in that age range having experienced negative mental health effects stemming from their music careers.

Billboard

The Prodigy share message on mental health: “Please do not suffer in silence” Read more at https://www.nme.com/news/music/the-prodigy-share-message-on-mental-health-please-do-not-suffer-in-silence-2484993#J6q3jgRxsCpvZpyX.99

Why parents are struggling to find mental health care for their children

“I lost my job due to mental health issues - and I’m far from the only one”

These are the groundbreaking drugs in the pipeline for treating bipolar disorder (including ketamine)

Tags: Awareness, Celebrity, Children, Choices, Drugs, Employment, Environment, Finance, Fire, List, Medical, Mental Health, Music, Parental Burden, Science, Study, Support, Training, Treatment, Youth

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07-May-2019


19 Psychiatric Medications to Power Up Your Mental Health 

 

There are lots of different medications out there to power up your mental health—but what do they all do? Here, David Hellerstein, M.D., a research psychiatrist and professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center, breaks down the different classes of mental health meds.

Anxiety is a disorder, but it can also be a symptom of another disorder, like depression, that could be treated with a nonaddictive medicine, says Dr. Hellerstein. And conditions such as panic disorders may be masked while taking certain antianxiety meds, particularly benzodiazepines. Many who are put on these medications might benefit from relaxation training, yoga, CBT, or an antidepressant instead, Dr. Hellerstein adds.

Benzodiazepines
In addition to anxiety, benzos can also be helpful for insomnia and depression. They bind to the same brain receptors as alcohol, and they can be addictive if used regularly. Check whether your anxiety could be a symptom of another disorder.

Men's Health

Power Up Your Mental Health

Tags: Drugs, Medicine, Mental Health, Therapy, Treatment

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01-May-2019


Scientists Discover Gene Mutation That Prevents Obesity 

 

Researchers in the United Kingdom say they’ve discovered a genetic mutation that mutes appetite, a scientific advancement that could potentially be used to develop new drugs to prevent obesity.

The mutation stems from a gene called MC4R, which researchers previously discovered can impact hunger — it acts as a switch to alert your brain when you are full, encouraging you to stop eating.

For some people with MC4R mutations, the “switch” is always off, meaning they never feel full and eat more. For them, the risk of diabetes and heart disease is 50 percent higher than those without the mutation.

But researchers from the University of Cambridge found the opposite effect as they pored through data from 500,000 volunteers from the U.K. Biobank, ages 40 to 69.

People

Tags: Diet, Drugs, Health, Obesity, Science, Treatment

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24-Apr-2019


When Psychedelics Make Your Last Months Alive Worth Living 

 

In the spring of 2018, Dan G. learned that the melanoma he had beaten 18 years earlier had returned and spread to his liver and lungs. After several months of chemo and immunotherapy, the 44-year-old decided the traditional treatments he’d been undergoing weren’t enough. The crippling side effects of the drugs had left him feeling hollow—and only exacerbated his already acute feelings of anxiety and depression. He often felt too decimated, both physically and mentally, to spend quality time with his wife and four-year-old son.

Unable to control what was happening in his body and discouraged by conventional treatments, Dan began to ponder the things he could control about his situation—namely his mental state—and started looking into options. The literature he found examining the correlation between improved mental health and psilocybin, the psychoactive compound in magic mushrooms, intrigued him, and his experiments with psychedelics over the next six months would significantly reduce the mental dread consuming his life.

Tonic

Tags: Disease, Drugs, Environment, Health, Life Expectancy, Medicine, Mental Health, Nature, Opinion, Treatment

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02-Apr-2019


How Bad Is It to Take a Quick-Fix Anxiety Pill? 

 

Alarm was the general consensus when online wellness company Hers advertised a “Performance Anxiety Aid” on social media earlier this month. The Facebook and Instagram ads for propranolol, a medication meant to treat heart conditions that doctors prescribe off-label for anxiety, said: “Nervous about your big date? Propranolol can help stop your shaky voice, sweating and racing heart beat.”

After Instagram users expressed outrage—some because they felt the ads suggested normal feelings needed to be “fixed,” and others saying it undermined their own experiences with debilitating anxiety—the company removed the ads and replaced them with an apology.

Tonic

Tags: Anxiety, Drugs, Environment, Interference, Safety

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29-Mar-2019




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