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Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Drugs'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Drug overdose deaths in 2020 hit the highest number ever recorded, CDC data shows 

 

More than 93,000 people died from drug overdoses in 2020, according to provisional data released by the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics. That's a 29.4% increase from the 72,151 deaths projected for 2019.

"Overdose deaths from synthetic opioids (primarily fentanyl) and psychostimulants such as methamphetamine also increased in 2020 compared to 2019. Cocaine deaths also increased in 2020, as did deaths from natural and semi-synthetic opioids (such as prescription pain medication)," the NCHS said in a statement.

Drug overdose deaths in 2020 hit the highest number ever recorded, CDC data shows

Legal marijuana either eases opioid crisis or makes it worse. The evidence is split.

Tags: Death, Drugs, Life

Permalink

16-Jul-2021


Clarence Thomas says federal laws against marijuana may no longer be necessary 

 

Clarence Thomas, one of the Supreme Court's most conservative justices, said Monday that because of the hodgepodge of federal policies on marijuana, federal laws against its use or cultivation may no longer make sense.

"A prohibition on interstate use or cultivation of marijuana may no longer be necessary or proper to support the federal government's piecemeal approach," he wrote.

Clarence Thomas says federal laws against marijuana may no longer be necessary

Tags: Drugs, Laws, Nature

Permalink

29-Jun-2021


FDA approves first weight-loss drug since 2014 

 

The Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved Wegovy, a version of a diabetes medicine that can now be marketed and sold as a weight-loss drug in the United States.

Why it matters: The drug helped certain people lose an average of 15% of their body weight over multiple weeks when used alongside increased physical activity and a reduced calorie meal plan.

How it works: The drug, a higher-dose version of Novo Nordisk's diabetes medicine semaglutide, is meant for people who have a body mass index (BMI) of 27 kg/m2 or greater and at least one weight-related ailment or people with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or greater.

Taken weekly, it works by mimicking a gut hormone that targets areas of the brain that control appetite and food intake and is intended for long-term weight management.

Those who took Wegovy and exercised and dieted in company-funded studies lost significantly more weight over 14 weeks than those who took a placebo while exercising and dieting.

FDA approves first weight-loss drug since 2014

Tags: Celebration, Choices, Discovery, Drugs, Mental Health, Weight

Permalink

06-Jun-2021


Xanax Will Now Come With a More Serious Warning Label 

 

Xanax will soon come with a new warning label, the New York Times reports. Last week, the Food and Drug Administration announced it will now require benzodiazepines, a class of common psychiatric drugs, to feature labeling that reflects the drugs’ high risk for abuse and addiction.

Xanax Will Now Come With a More Serious Warning Label

Tags: Addiction, Drugs, Toxic, Warning

Permalink

29-Sep-2020


Florida parents are getting high and exposing themselves during kids’ virtual classes 

 

It’s a lesson in reading, writing and reefer.

Florida moms and dads have been spotted smoking weed, drinking and walking around half-naked in the background of their kids’ online classes, frustrated teachers said at a school board meeting.

“Parents, please make sure that you have on proper clothing when you are walking behind your child’s computer because we’ve seen them in their drawers, their bras, and everything else,” Boca Raton Elementary teacher Edith Pride vented Wednesday, according to KATV.

Florida parents are getting high and exposing themselves during kids’ virtual classes

Tags: Alcohol, Children, Choices, Discipline, Drugs, Education, Environment, Horniness, Mental Health, Neglect, NSFW, Parental Burden, Parental Crime, Porn, Priorities, Self Interest, Sex, Social Media, Weird

Permalink

18-Sep-2020


Will There Ever Be a Cure for Addiction? 

 

From drinking hand-sanitizing gels to using synthetic marijuana, our society is constantly inventing new ways to get high. When one substance is banned, another quickly takes its place. What drives this never-ending hunt for the next high?

One important motivator is the pleasure principle. The quest for pleasure is a fundamental part of being human. It helps us meet our basic needs by pushing us to work towards specific goals.

Drugs provide an instant shortcut to our brain’s pleasure center. They flood our brains with dopamine and condition us to seek the next high. As a result, our bodies begin reducing their natural dopamine output. With repeated drug use, pleasure dissipates but the cravings remain. Thus, drugs hijack our natural drive for pleasure. Addicts pursue drugs despite the fact that the pleasure they experience from them progressively diminishes.

Psychology Today

Tags: Addiction, Alcohol, Disease, Drugs, Environment, Health, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Psychology, Science, Treatment

Permalink

16-Sep-2019


Humans Can Reverse Their Biological Age, Shows a 'Curious Case' Study 

 

In a small, 1-year clinical trial published Thursday in the journal Aging Cell, nine participants took three common medications — growth hormone and two diabetes drugs — and reversed their biological age by 2-and-a-half years on average. Greg Fahy, Ph.D., lead author of the study and chief science officer of anti-aging therapeutics company Intervene Immune, tells Inverse that this research proves the concept that biological aging may not be unstoppable.

“One of the lessons that we can draw from the study is that aging is not necessarily something that is beyond our control,” he says. “In fact it seems that aging is largely controlled by biological processes that we may be able to influence.”

Inverse

Tags: Aging, Drugs, Health, Medical, Options, Science, Study, Treatment

Permalink

08-Sep-2019


Teens are increasingly depressed, anxious, and suicidal. How can we help? 

 

Suicide rates lately have been increasing in all age groups in America, in almost every state. But the epidemic of youth suicide is particularly stymying, even for experts who study it.

There are plenty of hypotheses about what’s driving it floating around. They include the changing way teens interact with each other in digital spaces, economic stress and fallout from the 2008 recession, increasing social isolation, suicide contagion, and the fact that teens can more easily look up suicide methods online.

Two other enormous public health issues of our time are at play too. Children of opioid users appear to be more at risk for suicide. Same goes for young people who live in a house with a gun.

But the bottom line is that no one really knows why. That doesn’t mean more suicides can’t be prevented, however.

Vox

Tags: Anxiety, Drugs, Environment, Guns, Keep Abortion Legal, Parental Burden, Psychology, Responsibility, Social Media, Study, Suicide, Treatment, Warning, Youth

Permalink

12-Jul-2019


6 babies and 6 employees at a hospital have tested positive for a drug-resistant infection 

 

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Children's Hospital confirmed on Monday 12 cases of a drug-resistant staph infection in its neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), according to a statement from the hospital.

The six babies, including one who is potentially symptomatic, and six symptomatic employees who have tested positive for Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are being treated, UPMC said.

MRSA causes staph infections that are resistant to some antibiotics and therefore are difficult to treat. Though a common germ, staph can sometimes cause skin or wound infections, pneumonia, blood infections and in more extreme cases, sepsis or even death, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

CNN

Tags: Disease, Drugs, Environment, Health, Injury, Medical, Safety, Treatment, Warning

Permalink

02-Jul-2019


FIFTH OF YOUNG MEN WHO EXERCISE ENGAGE IN 'DISORDERED EATING' TO GAIN MUSCLE, STUDY FINDS 

 

A fifth of young men who exercise to gain muscle may be at risk of so-called muscularity-orientated disordered eating behaviours, a new research finds.

The study, conducted by researchers at the UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital in San Francisco, found that 22 per cent of males aged 18-24 who work out to bulk up exhibit these disordered eating behaviours.

Meanwhile, five per cent of women in the same age category show similar characteristics.

Independent

Tags: Diet, Disease, Drugs, Exercise, Health, Injury, Study, Training, Vitamins

Permalink

20-Jun-2019


Can I Use a Sick Day as a ‘Mental Health Day’? 

 

Rosenblatt is director of communications for Accessibility Partners, a small IT consulting firm. The company is so small that it doesn’t fall under the Americans with Disabilities Act, and it doesn’t have to follow the same federal rules with sick leave that large companies do.

However, her boss has been accommodating, allowing her time to attend therapy and psychiatric appointments, to deal with medication changes and even time in inpatient treatment.

That kind of treatment toward mental health might seem rare, but there’s evidence that it’s less taboo than it used to be.

The World Health Organization recently classified burnout as a diagnosable health condition.

According to an Australian study, one-third of workers have “faked an illness” to use a sick day for their mental health.

But 26 percent of employers have fired a worker for using a sick day for what they see as a “personal day.”

So deciding to take your sick day as a mental health day can be a tricky decision, especially if you’re worried your employer won’t see it as legitimate.

Mental health is a disability
Here’s the thing. Changes to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in 2008 expanded the definition of disability. This means that mental disorders like depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety and schizophrenia are protected.

So, if you’ve got a diagnosed mental disorder like about 44 million American adults, almost one in five people, you can’t be fired for asking for accommodations, such as the occasional mental health day.

Rewire

9 Surprising Changes That Occur In The Body When You Get Rejected

Hundreds weigh in on Chicago’s mental health crisis as city task force examines solutions

More Millennials Are Dying 'Deaths of Despair,' as Overdose and Suicide Rates Climb

Tags: All Rights, Brain, Business, Death, Drugs, Employment, Health, Mental Health, Overdose, Policy, Protections, Representation, Science, Sick Day, Study, Suicide, Support, Youth

Permalink

14-Jun-2019


Kids and teens are experiencing such severe side effects from weight loss and sexual function pills, they're ending up in the hospital 

 

Supplements send an estimated 23,000 people to the hospital each year in the United States, and a new study suggests children and young adults comprise a significant number of these visits. Even more alarming, supplements for weight loss, muscle gain, and sexual function were some of the biggest culprits for adolescent supplement-related hospitalizations, according to a new retrospective study in Journal of Adolescent Health.

Researchers looked at adverse event reports in a Food & Drug Administration (FDA) database that were filed between January 2005 and April 2005 and found 1,392 adverse event reports related to supplement use in young people (from babies to 25 year-olds).

The researchers zeroed in on 977 reports where a single supplement was deemed responsible for causing a person's hospital visit.

Business Insider

Tags: Abuse, Chemicals, Children, Choices, Damage, Drugs, FDA, Health, Medical, Parental Burden, Parental Crime, Safety, Vitamins, Youth

Permalink

11-Jun-2019


Here's exactly how restricting abortion harms public health 

 

This week, Alabama’s governor signed the most extreme anti-abortion bill in the country, effectively banning the procedure. It’s just one of a host of new laws restricting abortion: including one by the Missouri senate which passed a bill banning abortion after eight weeks, and one signed by the governor of Georgia banning abortion after six weeks, before most people would know that they’re pregnant.

Even though they’ve been signed by the governors, the Alabama and Georgia laws are not yet in effect—people can still get legal abortions in these states. And there is still a constitutional right to abortion in the United States. However, access to safe abortion varies widely across the country: Some states have laws that restrict the number of clinics that can provide abortion services, for example, or require people to wait a certain amount of time between a counseling appointment and the procedure, which is medically unnecessary. As these laws are challenged and the abortion conversation continues, it’s important to recognize that restricting abortion can have significant repercussions for people who can become pregnant.

Popular Science

'Every Pregnancy Is a Risk of Harm': How Criminalizing Miscarriage Could Play Out

Tags: Abortion, Alcohol, All Rights, Arrest, Drugs, Empathy, Health, Interference, Legal, Murder, Overpopulation, Parental Burden, Politics, Safety, Saving The Environment!, Sexual Harassment, Woman's Rights

Permalink

16-May-2019


Being too hard on yourself could lead to these debilitating disorders 

 

Do you feel like the fate of the world rests on your shoulders? As well as being stressful, that mindset may be affecting your mental health. A sense of over-responsibility is one trait that makes people vulnerable to developing obsessive-compulsive disorder or anxiety, according to a study published in the International Journal of Cognitive Therapy.

While it’s normal to feel anxious, and also to act in ways that one might casually describe as OCD – such as keeping your house spotlessly clean – it’s when these behaviors become persistent and intense that they develop from traits into disorders, researchers say.

The Ladders

How to support a partner who's experiencing mental health issues

Guest opinion: Our legislators must understand mental health better

How flying into an angry rage is a sign you could be seriously ill

Feel Like Your Antidepressants Stopped Working? Here’s What Could Be Happening.

Having Psoriasis May Increase The Risk Of Mental Health Disorders, New Research Shows

I started being as nice to myself as I am to my friends and it did absolute wonders for my mental health

City life damages mental health in ways we’re just starting to understand

FHE Health Announces Scholarships To Encourage More People To Enter The Addiction And Mental Health Field

Tags: Aging, Anger, Awareness, Disease, Drugs, Education, Employment, Family, Finance, Govt, Insurance, Mental Health, Psychology, Relationships, Scholarship, Study, Support, Survival, Training, Treatment

Permalink

13-May-2019


Low-dose aspirin linked to bleeding in the skull, new report says 

 

Taking low-dose aspirin to prevent heart disease and stroke is associated with an increased risk of bleeding in the skull in people without a history of those conditions, according to a new report.

Researchers analyzed data from 13 previous studies in which over 130,000 people ages 42 to 74, who didn't have a history of heart disease or stroke, were given either low-dose aspirin or a placebo for the prevention of these conditions.
An aspirin is typically defined as low-dose if it is between 75 and 100 milligrams, but most over-the-counter pills are around 81 milligrams.

CNN

Tags: Awareness, Brain, Drugs, Health, Injury, Medical, Safety, Science

Permalink

13-May-2019




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