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Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Science'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

How to see the 'super worm equinox moon,' the last supermoon of 2019 

 

Get ready, skywatchers. The last supermoon of 2019 will be visible in the night sky Wednesday, coinciding with the spring equinox that heralds the start of a new season.

The March 20 spectacle will be the final of this year’s three back-to-back supermoons. The first was on Jan. 21, and the second — the biggest and brightest supermoon of 2019 — was on Feb. 19.

A supermoon is a full moon that has reached the closest point to Earth in its monthly elliptical orbit around the planet. As such, supermoons appear larger and brighter in the night sky, though these changes are typically far too subtle to detect.

Full moons can be observed with the naked eye and don’t require any special equipment.

NBC News

Tags: Astronomy, Environment, Program, Science

Permalink

20-Mar-2019


People's Brains Don't Reach Adulthood Until Age 30, Study Finds 

 

There's a good reason why managing adult responsibilities only became somewhat bearable in your 30s, according to researchers.

Although anyone over 18 years old is considered an adult, scientists argue that our brains don't mature that quickly, The Independent reports. Speaking at a meeting of the Academy of Medical Sciences in Oxford in London, researchers explained that our brains slowly transition to adulthood, which is finally reached in our 30s.

“What we’re really saying is that to have a definition of when you move from childhood to adulthood looks increasingly absurd,” professor Peter Jones, a neuroscientist at the University of Cambridge, explained at the meeting. “It’s a much more nuanced transition that takes place over three decades."

Men's Health

Tags: Aging, Brain, Environment, Maturity, Mental Health, Science, Study

Permalink

20-Mar-2019


A dog potentially exposed more than 100 people to black plague in Colorado 

 

At least 116 people and 46 animals in Colorado were potentially exposed to the black plague after veterinarians struggled to diagnose a critically ill dog back in 2017.

The unusual case prompted health experts to issue an equally unusual—and perhaps startling—warning. That is, that dogs in the US may contract the deadly bacterial infection at any time of the year, and the signs may be hard to spot.

“[P]neumonic plague, although rare, should be considered in dogs that have fever and respiratory signs with potential exposure in disease-endemic areas, regardless of season and lobar [lung] distribution,” the Colorado health experts concluded. They published details of the case and their warning this week in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

The plague is endemic to areas in the Western United States, meaning it circulates continually. Though it’s best known for causing the catastrophic Black Death pandemic in Europe during the fourteenth century, it arrived in the States around 1900 on rat-infested steam ships. Since then it has spread to, and quietly lurked in, rural rodent populations, including rock squirrels, wood rats, ground squirrels, prairie dogs, chipmunks, mice, voles, and rabbits. Infected populations tend to pop up in parts of Arizona, California, Colorado, Oregon, Nevada, and New Mexico. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that in recent decades there has been an average of seven human cases documented each year, with a range of one to 17 cases.

ars Technica

Tags: Animals, Disease, Environment, Nature, Science

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15-Mar-2019


Your Environment Is Cleaner. Your Immune System Has Never Been So Unprepared. 

 

Should you pick your nose?

Don’t laugh. Scientifically, it’s an interesting question.

Should your children pick their noses? Should your children eat dirt? Maybe: Your body needs to know what immune challenges lurk in the immediate environment.

Should you use antibacterial soap or hand sanitizers? No. Are we taking too many antibiotics? Yes.

“I tell people, when they drop food on the floor, please pick it up and eat it,” said Dr. Meg Lemon, a dermatologist in Denver who treats people with allergies and autoimmune disorders.

NY Times

Tags: Allergy, Environment, Health, History, Music, Opinion, Science, Study

Permalink

15-Mar-2019


Judge bars unvaccinated students from returning to Rockland County school 

 

A federal judge in Rockland County, New York has jumped into the simmering debate over measles vaccinations. With cases rising, the judge barred 50 unvaccinated students from attending the Green Meadow Waldorf School for at least three weeks.

Parent Beatrice Burgis agrees with the judge's ruling that would keep unvaccinated kids at home.

"I believe that he's trying to mitigate a potential further outbreak and he's trying to keep everybody safe," she said.

On Tuesday, a new case in Rockland County brought the total to 146. This year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has reported 228 cases in 12 states. The Rockland County outbreak was centered in an Orthodox Jewish community.

CBS News

Tags: Backlash, Children, Disease, Environment, Health, Lifestyle, Nature, Parental Burden, Religion, Safety, Saving The Environment!, Science, Treatment, Vaccine, World, Youth

Permalink

13-Mar-2019


Scientists find differences between LGBTQ & straight people who die from suicide 

 

For many in the LGBTQ community, dealing with suicidal feelings are an all-too-common occurrence, and one that should give pause.

Now, a study published in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine is taking a closer look at LGBTQ people who have died by suicide and it reveals some surprising differences between our community and straight people.

Amongst the findings was this stark fact: young LGBTQ people are five times more likely to attempt suicide than straight people.

LGBTQ Nation

Tags: Environment, LGBTQ, Lifestyle, Science, Study, Suicide, Treatment, Youth

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11-Mar-2019


PSYCHEDELIC MUSHROOMS CAN BOOST CREATIVITY AND EMPATHY FOR A WEEK 

 

The benefits of taking psychedelics could last long after the trip ends.

A team of Dutch researchers has found that psilocybin, the active ingredient in psychedelic mushrooms, doesn’t just increase a person’s creativity, empathy, and feeling of well-being while a user trips. It also allows them to experience all of those benefits for up to seven days — providing valuable insight into how we could tap into the therapeutic value of hallucinogenics.

Futurism

Tags: Drugs, Mental Health, Nature, Science, Study, Therapy, Treatment

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08-Mar-2019


Some Anti-Vaxxers Aren't Getting Their Pets Vaccinated. Here's Why That's So Dangerous 

 

Dogs can’t get autism, and even if they could, vaccines couldn’t cause it. Period. But some anti-vaxxers are increasingly making the same unfounded claims about pets and vaccines they’ve been repeating about children and vaccines for the past 20 years: that vaccines are unnecessary, dangerous and that they can cause a form of (canine) autism, along with other diseases. Just as with kids, that may be driving down pet vaccination rates. And the movement, while niche, shows no sign of stopping; in some states in the U.S., anti-vax activists have recently agitated to make state laws about mandatory pet vaccinations more lax.

Time

Tags: Animals, Backlash, Disease, Environment, Health, Ignorance, Inhumanity, Injury, Medical, Pets, Science, Survival, Terraforming, Treatment, Vaccine, Warning, World

Permalink

08-Mar-2019


How Federal Disaster Money Favors The Rich 

 

Disasters are becoming more common in America. In the early and mid-20th century, fewer than 20 percent of U.S. counties experienced a disaster each year. Today, it's about 50 percent. According to the 2018 National Climate Assessment, climate change is already driving more severe droughts, floods and wildfires in the U.S. And those disasters are expensive. The federal government spends billions of dollars annually helping communities rebuild and prevent future damage. But an NPR investigation has found that across the country, white Americans and those with more wealth often receive more federal dollars after a disaster than do minorities and those with less wealth. Federal aid isn't necessarily allocated to those who need it most; it's allocated according to cost-benefit calculations meant to minimize taxpayer risk.

Put another way, after a disaster, rich people get richer and poor people get poorer. And federal disaster spending appears to exacerbate that wealth inequality.

npr

Tags: Environment, Finance, Policy, Poverty, Privilege, Recovery, Science, Survival, Tax

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06-Mar-2019


Stroke recovery: Obesity may improve odds of survival, study finds 

 

When it comes to stroke, being very overweight may improve odds of survival, a new study suggests.

While obesity is clearly associated with an increased risk of heart disease and stroke, a new study reveals a counterintuitive result: Patients who were severely obese were 62 percent less likely to die in the first three months after a stroke compared to those of normal weight, according to a report presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology. In contrast, patients who were underweight were 67 percent more likely to die within three months of a stroke compared to those of normal weight.

NBC News

Tags: Health, Medical, Recovery, Science, Study, Weight

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04-Mar-2019


Eating breakfast is not a good weight loss strategy, scientists confirm 

 

You probably feel guilty when you skip breakfast. Why wouldn’t you? Many of us grew up with parents fussing to make sure we had something in our bellies before we set off for school. Or we were brainwashed by TV commercial propaganda that promised eating cereal would make us lean and athletic, that breakfast keeps our metabolism on track and helps us avoid bingeing later.

It turns out the research on eating breakfast has been far, far less conclusive than either your mother or Tony the Tiger would have you believe. In fact, if you’ve been eating breakfast to stave off weight gain, researchers are increasingly learning that breakfast might have the opposite of the desired effect — it can promote more calorie consumption and weight gain. But even the best available studies in the mix have serious limitations.

Vox

Tags: Diet, Food, Health, Science, Study

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04-Feb-2019


'Natural' Sugars Are Not Better for You Than Regular Sugar 

 

Sugar has emerged as the latest scapegoat in our ongoing search for a dietary silver bullet, an outcropping of “clean eating” movements popularized by celebs and lifestyle Instagrammers and even news outlets. (Plenty of different nutrients have been targeted in the past—not that long ago, we were cutting fat out of everything.)

There’s nothing wrong with doing a little experimenting in the kitchen, sure. And most of those natural alternatives are pretty undetectable in a cookie, yes. But are any of the unrefined sugars that are touted for their health benefits—raw honey, maple syrup, brown rice syrup, date sugar, coconut sugar, agave, even molasses—really better for you than good old-fashioned granulated sugar?

Tonic

Tags: Food, Health, Ignorance, Safety, Science

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01-Feb-2019


Tyson Foods Recalls 18 Tons of Chicken Nuggets After Reports of Contamination 

 

Tyson Foods is recalling more than 36,000 pounds of frozen chicken nuggets after consumers reported finding soft, blue pieces of rubber inside the popular food.

The recall comes in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service and applies to the company’s Panko Chicken Nuggets that were sold in five pound plastic bags in grocery stores nationwide.

Consumers are being urged to look for bags with the “best by” date of Nov. 26, 2019, the Case Code 3308SDL03 and a time stamp ranging from 23:00 through 01:59. If you’ve got the product, either discard it or return it to the point of purchase for a refund.

Fortune

Tags: Environment, Food, Health, Poultry, Recall, Saving The Environment!, Science, Terraforming, Toxic, Warning, Waste

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30-Jan-2019


Heavy metals found in 45 fruit juices: report... 

 

Video.

CBS News

Tags: Chemicals, Diet, Drink, Environment, Health, Safety, Saving The Environment!, Science, Terraforming, Toxic, Video, Waste

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30-Jan-2019


Nectarines, peaches, plums recalled over possible listeria contamination 
 

Thousands of pieces of fruit have been recalled in 18 states because they may be contaminated with the harmful bacteria listeria, the Food and Drug Administration announced. New York-based Jac. Vandenberg, Inc. issued the recall for some of its nectarines, peaches and plums.

The company found listeria monocytogenes on some finished products through routine sampling, the FDA said. No illnesses have been reported.

The bacteria "can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems," the FDA said in its announcement. A listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths in pregnant women, according to the agency.

CBS News

Tags: Chemicals, Disease, Food, Fruit, Health, Safety, Science, Terraforming, Warning

Permalink

28-Jan-2019




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