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Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Science'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Embryos Don’t Have Hearts 

 

Within the last few years, six U.S. states — Kentucky, Mississippi, Ohio, Georgia, Iowa, and North Dakota — have passed so-called “heartbeat bills,” a term that’s become shorthand for a proposed ban on abortions beginning six weeks into a pregnancy, or the point at which a “fetal heartbeat” can be detected. Four more states have similar bills pending. Anti-abortion activists have doubled down on “heartbeat” messaging — in a recent news release regarding the ACLU’s legal challenge of the Ohio bill, the state’s leading anti-abortion group, Ohio Right to Life, used the term eight times in 300 words.

But obstetricians say the term “fetal heartbeat” is misleading, and that this scientific misunderstanding, among countless others, may contribute to negative public opinion toward abortion.

The Cut

Tags: Abortion, Argument, Choices, Keep Abortion Legal, Misrepresentation, Overpopulation, Saving The Environment!, Science

Permalink

24-May-2019


The Shame-Free Guide to Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder 

 

Sexual desire is a largely misunderstood aspect of our sexual health. It’s stigmatized and pathologized on both ends: whether you have no appetite or an extremely high desire to have sex, it’s seen as problematic. All of that can make it feel really overwhelming to reach out for help when something might actually be out alignment with your libido. Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is a persistent or recurring lack of sexual fantasies and appetite for sex which is causing the patient distress and can’t be accounted for as a symptom of another illness.

It can be difficult to diagnose HSDD as there is no baseline “norm” for sexual desire across the spectrum — you have to feel out where your level of desire feels nourishing. Everyone is different when it comes to how they experience sexual desire and it’s perfectly normal for your libido to ebb and flow throughout your life. Juliet Widoff, an OBGYN at Callen-Lorde, says screenings for HSDD should happen regularly, as “it is a disorder that can cause a significant amount of personal and interpersonal distress and, because there is a great deal of shame and stigma surrounding it, patients may not be forthcoming regarding their symptoms.”

Allure

Tags: Education, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Nature, Science, Sex, Study, Therapy, Training, Treatment

Permalink

23-May-2019


4 Reasons You Feel Cold All The Time That Don't Have To Do With The Temperature 

 

With spring in full bloom, the warm weather provides the perfect environment for picnics, long walks in nature, and evening concerts in local parks. But if you're someone who works in an office, you probably know that with air conditioning comes frigid temperatures the moment you arrive at work in the morning. You've probably learned to cope by keeping a fluffy blanket on your chair or pausing for hot tea breaks through the afternoon, but some of the reasons you feel cold all the time have less to do with external temperature than they do with what's going on inside your body.

It's totally normal to feely extra chilly after eating an enormous ice cream cone or sitting in front of a fan, but according to medical doctor Alex Spinoso, being consistently cold should be a cause for concern when your fingers or toes start to turn white or if you're getting sick on a regular basis. If you feel like you're freezing, even when your BFFs think things are nice and toasty, you might want to check in with your doctor to make sure that you aren't experiencing any health problems.

Elite Daily

Tags: Awareness, Cold, Environment, Health, Medical, Nature, Science, Treatment

Permalink

23-May-2019


What Is Usually the Root Cause of Mental Illness? 

 

Is mental illness just an outcome (not sure if that's the right word) of mental and emotional insecurities? originally appeared on Quora, the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world. You can follow Quora on Twitter, Facebook, and Google Plus.

There is no one cause of mental illness. Some seem to have a strong genetic component, such as Schizophrenia, and others appear to be the obvious result of an exposure to environmental trauma, such as a soldier’s PTSD, with everything in between these two extremes.

Here are some of the main variables that combine to determine the likelihood that someone will develop a diagnosable mental disorder:

Genetics

Apple News

Child sexual abuse victims — mental health support is critical

WHY QUITTING SEX COULD BE THE ANSWER TO EMOTIONAL WELLNESS

Tags: Abuse, Celibacy, Children, Environment, Mental Health, Parental Burden, Religion, Science, Sex, Study, Youth

Permalink

22-May-2019


Parents are poisoning their autistic children with bleach. The alarming trend is promoted online as a 'miracle cure.' 

 

Some parents are poisoning their children with chlorine dioxide to heal autism, according to an NBC News investigation.

The alarming so-called treatment is being promoted online by proponents who claim it's a "miracle cure."

Chlorine dioxide can cause irreparable bodily harm, doctors warn. It damages the digestive system and wreaks havoc on red blood cells.

"It can lead to kidney damage and kidney failure," Dr. Daniel Brooks, medical director at Banner University Medical Center's Poison and Drug Information Center and Outpatient Toxicology Clinic in Phoenix, told NBC News.

Brooks described the use of the chemical as a treatment for autism as "ludicrous."

The Blaze

Tags: Awareness, Backlash, Chemicals, Children, Disease, Health, Interference, Medical, Parental Burden, Parental Crime, Poison, Responsibility, Safety, Science, Toxic, Treatment, Warning

Permalink

22-May-2019


"You cannot find a soulmate," relationship expert Belinda Luscombe says 

 

It's well known that love, respect and trust are all crucial components for a strong marriage, but a new book suggests that science plays an important role, too.

Belinda Luscombe, author of "Marriageology: The Art and Science of Staying Together," shared what her research reveals about what can help strengthen a relationship.

One of Luscombe's major findings may come as a surprise: She says you'll never meet your soulmate.

"You cannot find a soulmate," she said Tuesday on "CBS This Morning." "The search for a soulmate is like searching for the only one pair of trousers that would make you happy."

CBS News

Tags: Advice, Love, Opinion, Relationships, Science, Support, Treatment

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21-May-2019


DARPA: This Smart Contact Lens Could Give Soldiers Superpowers 

 

French engineering school IMT Atlantique revealed what it calls “the first stand-alone contact lens with a flexible micro battery” earlier this month.

And, notably, it caught the attention of the U.S. military’s attention: the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is reportedly interested in the contact lens to augment troops’ visual capabilities in the field, according to Task and Purpose — meaning the gadget could represent the augmented contact lens that DARPA has spent a decade searching for.

The biggest challenge that IMT Atlantique engineers encountered was to scale down the battery. But thanks to a newly developed flexible micro battery, they found a way to continuously light an LED light source for “several hours,” according to a press release.

Futurism

Tags: Discovery, Eye, Intelligence, Military, Science, Study, Surveillance, Tech, World

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17-May-2019


Multivitamins Are a Waste of Money for Most People 

 

Plenty of research suggests that taking vitamin supplements isn’t helpful unless you’re working with your doctor to address a specific deficiency.

Vice

Tags: Health, Life Expectancy, Medical, Safety, Science, Vitamins

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16-May-2019


The Brewing Backlash Against Hustle Culture and Its Effects on Our Mental Health 

 

Signs you need to reprioritize

We’ve been taught that working hard is a good thing — so how do we know when it becomes a problem? According to Dion Metzger, M.D., a psychiatrist in Atlanta, it’s all about balance, and you have to pay attention to your proverbial scale. “We’re all trying to balance work, relationships, and health. You will know your hustle is tipping the scale when it starts taking away from the other two. You are sleeping less, eating unhealthily, or cancelling plans with loved ones. This is when you draw the line,” she tells Thrive. “Your scale is no longer balanced. This is the time when you need to step back from the hustle and recalibrate. Balance prevents burnout.”

Thrive Global

How To Get More Comfortable Talking About Your Mental Health

When Mental Illness Is Your Family Heirloom

Why Latinx People Need Better Mental Health Support

Using An Out Of Office To Deal With Email Expectations Was An Unexpected Act Of Self-Care

Tags: Awareness, Business, Employment, Environment, Family, Finance, Health, Heritage, History, Mental Health, Nature, Portrait, Recovery, Relationships, Science, Study, Treatment

Permalink

16-May-2019


Sunscreen doesn’t protect dark-skinned people from developing melanoma 

 

Melanoma is a potentially deadly form of skin cancer linked to overexposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun. Sunscreen can block UV rays and therefore reduce the risk of sun burns, which ultimately reduces the risk of developing melanoma. Thus, the promotion of sunscreen as an effective melanoma prevention strategy is a reasonable public health message.

While this may be true for light-skinned people, such as individuals of European descent, this is not the case for darker skinned people, or individuals of African descent.

qz

Sunscreen Ingredients Are Absorbed Into Your Blood. Here's What That Could Mean

Tags: Disease, Environment, Health, Nature, Perception, Race, Science, Skin, Study, Sun, Sunscreen, World

Permalink

16-May-2019


These robots were built to be punched, stabbed and cursed. Here's why you might want to oblige them. 

 

It’s no secret that technology can drive us batty. Between glitchy apps, social media outages and data breaches, the only thing stopping some people from smashing their personal tech is the exorbitant cost of replacing it.

Now a trio of researchers say they’ve found a way to use technology to channel our rage rather than provoke it. They’ve created robots designed not to perform tasks but to serve as our personal punching bags.

The research team, based at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, says the so-called “cathartic objects” are designed to be hit, stabbed, cursed and otherwise abused. The bots don’t complain or fight back, as seen in a video, but they do respond by flashing lights and flailing around.

Why should we take our anger out on robots? The researchers say it’s all about catharsis, the process by which people give full expression of their negative emotions as a way to curb them.

NBC News

Tags: Anxiety, Bullying, Employment, Environment, Hostility, Mental Health, Psychology, Reckless, Safety, Science, Weird

Permalink

15-May-2019


Should Gay Men Be Getting Anal Pap Smears? 

 

It’s time to talk about Pap smears, guys.

More specifically, if you’re a man who has sex with other men, or MSM, you should consider talking to your medical provider about getting an anal Pap smear.

Most men outside the medical profession probably have only a vague idea at best of what a Pap smear is in the first place. It’s a screening test first developed for cervical cancer, known by a shortened version of its discoverer’s name. It’s performed by collecting a small sample of cells from the cervix, which are then examined for changes in their structure that might be signs of precancerous states. By routinely screening and initiating treatment early, what was once a leading cause of death among women of childbearing age now ranks 14th in cancer frequency.

In recent decades, the link between human papillomavirus and cervical cancer has been clearly established. The overwhelming majority of cervical cancer cases are caused by HPV infection, with two strains of the virus causing over 70 percent of them.

Slate

Tags: Anal, Awareness, Choices, Disease, Environment, Health, LGBTQ, Lifestyle, Safety, Science, Sex, Test, Treatment

Permalink

15-May-2019


Men also have a ‘biological clock’ that poses serious health risks: study 

 

The battle of the sexes just got a lot more equalized.

A new study out of Rutgers University finds that men have a ticking “biological clock” — just like women — and if they make babies in their 40s it can negatively impact the health of their partners and progeny.

“While it’s widely accepted that physiological changes that occur in women after 35 can affect conception, pregnancy and the health of the child, most men don’t realize their advanced age can have a similar impact,” says study author Gloria Bachmann, director of the Women’s Health Institute at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, in a statement.

The number of infants born to dads aged 45-plus spiked 10 percent in the US over the past four decades, likely due to assisted reproductive technology. Bachmann analyzed the effect of “advanced parental age” — brace yourself: it ranges from 35 to 45 — on fertility, pregnancy and the health of children for her study published in the journal Maturitas.

Guys who start siring spawn later in life put their lovers at risk for increased pregnancy complications such as gestational diabetes, preterm birth and preeclampsia. Plus, the resulting babies were found to be at higher risk of premature birth, late-term still birth, low Apgar scores and birth weight, higher incidence of newborn seizures and birth defects such as congenital heart disease and cleft palate.

NY Post

Tags: Aging, Children, Environment, Health, Maturity, Men, Mental Health, Nature, Parenting, Science

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14-May-2019


OUR REALITY COULD BE A “HOLOGRAM” CREATED BY QUANTUM PHYSICS 

 

Ever since Einstein posited that space and time were inextricably linked, scientists have wondered where the cosmic web called spacetime comes from.

Now, ongoing research in quantum physics may finally arrive at an explanation: A bizarre phenomenon called quantum entanglement could be the underlying basis for the four dimensions of space and time in which we all live, according to a deep dive by Knowable Magazine. In fact, in a mind-boggling twist, our reality could be a “hologram” of this quantum state.

Futurism

Tags: Discovery, Perception, Science, Study, World

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13-May-2019


A LAB GREW A “MINI BRAIN” FROM THIS GUY’S CELLS. THEN THINGS GOT WEIRD. 

 

When science writer Philip Ball donated some flesh from his arm to a neuroscience lab growing “mini brains,” he originally intended to contribute to research into the biological mechanisms of dementia.

Instead, he ended up with a simplified genetic replica of his own brain growing in a petri dish — and found himself questioning what makes us human, according to a new review of Ball’s upcoming book published in Nature.

Futurism

Tags: Brain, Discovery, Science, Study, Writing

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13-May-2019




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