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Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Writing'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

How Tracy Sherrod Came to Lead America’s Oldest Black Publishing Imprint 

 

Lauren Michele Jackson recently wrote a piece for Vulture, looking at lists of Black texts that pop up whenever there’s a galvanizing incident of racial violence. A lot of the magazines and websites will publish a list like, here’s what to read to think about race. Jackson wrote. “Aside from the contemporary teaching texts, genre appears indiscriminately: essays slide against memoir and folklore, poetry squeezed on either side by sociological tomes. This, maybe ironically but maybe not, reinforces an already pernicious literary divide that books written by or about minorities are for educational purposes, racism and homophobia and stuff, wholly segregated from matters of form and grammar, lyric and scene.” I’d really like to hear your perspective on this, because you publish books about race, but you publish books about everything. Do you think readers should be looking at books as curative or as medicine for toxicity and racism in this culture?

Slate

Tags: Awareness, Books, Celebration, Choices, Education, Entertainment, History, Politics, Racism, Representation, Respect, Writing

Permalink

06-Jul-2020


It’s hard to care about other people’s feelings online 

 

Over the last five or six years, I’ve seen a shift in the weather patterns of my particular corner of online. I don’t identify as an accelerationist, but it does feel like things are speeding up, maybe because the web’s distribution mechanisms have become centralized and gotten slicker. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr all feel like different information delivery systems than they did even a few years ago, and email forwards are dead, at least for my generation. Whatever the case is, I’m getting more news alerts than I ever have before. Everything trends for a minute now.

If you spend enough time online, wherever that happens to be, you’ll probably see it start happening to you. It’s easier to meme something than it is to feel any kind of way about something serious happening to other people. What I mean to say is that it sometimes feels like the internet has made tragedies harder to interpret by making them feel more emotionally distant; nothing seems real unless it happens to you or to someone you know. The medium obscures the reality of other people’s experiences, even as it makes them more visible.

The Verge

Tags: Empathy, Environment, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Opinion, Social Media, Writing

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28-Feb-2020


Schools, Sex, and Masculinity 

 

Boys are watching a lot of pornography.

Consent is the bare minimum.

Boys must be empowered with the emotional strength it takes to endure being alone.

The narrative of the “good guy” can get in the way of moral growth.

Boys are growing into men they don’t want to be, and this unleashes untold harm in the world. Though it is often awkward and difficult to talk about sex with boys in school, having these conversations can help prevent a great deal of cruelty and unhappiness. We must create school cultures that allow us to have the types of conversations that will help usher in the type of future our boys need if they are going to grow into morally responsible men.

Good Men Project

Tags: Education, Environment, Etiquette, Men, Parental Burden, Psychology, Responsibility, Sex, Writing, Youth

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17-Feb-2020


Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome 

 

Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome: America's Legacy of Enduring Injury and Healing (PTSS) is a 2005 theoretical work by Joy DeGruy (née Leary).[1][2] PTSS describes a set of behaviors, beliefs and actions associated with or, related to multi-generational trauma experienced by African Americans that include but are not limited to undiagnosed and untreated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in enslaved Africans and their descendants.[1]

PTSS posits that centuries of slavery in the United States, followed by systemic and structural racism and oppression, including lynching, Jim Crow laws, and unwarranted mass incarceration, have resulted in multigenerational maladaptive behaviors, which originated as survival strategies. The syndrome continues because children whose parents suffer from PTSS are often indoctrinated into the same behaviors, long after the behaviors have lost their contextual effectiveness.

DeGruy states that PTSS is not a disorder that can simply be treated and remedied clinically but rather also requires profound social change in individuals, as well as in institutions that continue to reify inequality and injustice toward the descendants of enslaved Africans.

DeGruy holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Communication, a master's degree in Social Work, a master's degree in Clinical Psychology, and a Ph.D. in Social Work Research. She teaches social work at Portland State University and gives lectures on PTSS nationally and internationally.

Wiki

What is 'Post-traumatic slave syndrome'?

Tags: All Rights, Books, Environment, History, Opinion, Perception, Psychology, Race, Study, Treatment, World, Writing

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27-Jan-2020


What Today’s Teen Boys Really Think About Sex, Toxic Masculinity, and #MeToo 

 

Conversations around toxic masculinity, consent, and the ways boys are taught about sex and relationships are extremely prevalent today. How have these conversations affected boys’ real lives? Or are they still dealing with the same trappings of masculinity and rape culture that they were 10 years ago?

Boys still brag a lot about how they “never cry.”

Brené Brown calls emotional vulnerability the secret sauce that holds relationships together. So, if we cut boys off from the ability to feel or express that, we’re basically cutting them off from the ability to have, establish, and engage in healthy relationships.

I started noticing how often boys used ‘hilarious’ or something being ‘funny’ — those were the words they used — when what they really meant was that something was disturbing, that it violated their morals, that it was reprehensible, that it disgusted them. Hilarious or funny were a default position. If you see something as hilarious when you don’t know how else to respond to it, then you won’t be targeted or mocked.

It’s another way that boys are disconnected from what they truly feel. Their heads are disconnected from their hearts. Among other things, that also undermines their compassion for the target of whatever is hilarious, which, in a situation of sexual misconduct, is a girl. I noticed some of the really high profile assault cases with high school boys as the perpetrators. What those boys said when people said, “How could you have done this horrible thing?” They’d say, “Well, we just thought we were being funny. We thought it was hilarious.”

Fatherly

How to Talk to Boys About Porn, Consent and Sex, According to Boys & Sex Author

Tags: Awareness, Education, Environment, Lifestyle, Men, Nature, Parental Burden, Sex, Study, Writing, Youth

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09-Jan-2020


'It concerns me greatly': Have #MeToo and modern feminism gone too far? 

 

Joanna Williams was raised a feminist. But these days, she hesitates to identify as one.

The author and academic thinks today's feminism "lost the plot somewhere along the line," describing it as a "white middle class feminism."

"[It] seems intent upon telling women that they are victims, that they are vulnerable, that they need special protections," she says. "For me, feminism was always about fighting for liberation."

CBC

Tags: All Rights, Environment, Feminism, Hate, Politics, Psychology, Woman's Rights, Women, Writing

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26-Nov-2019


Cyborgs will replace humans and remake the world, James Lovelock says 

 

For tens of thousands of years, humans have reigned as our planet's only intelligent, self-aware species. But the rise of intelligent machines means that could change soon, perhaps in our own lifetimes. Not long after that, Homo sapiens could vanish from Earth entirely.

That’s the jarring message of a new book by James Lovelock, the famed British environmentalist and futurist. “Our supremacy as the prime understanders of the cosmos is rapidly coming to end,” he says in the book, "Novacene." “The understanders of the future will not be humans but what I choose to call ‘cyborgs’ that will have designed and built themselves.”

NBC News

Tags: All Rights, Books, Environment, Future, Humanity, Intelligence, Nature, Population, Science, Writing

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26-Aug-2019


Writing as Therapy  

 

Writing therapy is the cheapest and easily accessible form of therapy.

People have used writing as a medium for emotional expression for ages.

Directed writing can be your own version of therapy.

The concept of writing as therapy was first introduced by New York psychologist Dr Ira Progoff in the mid-1960s.

“As a practising psychotherapist who had studied under Carl Jung, Progoff developed what he called the Intensive Journal Method, a means of self-exploration and personal expression based on the regular and methodical upkeep of a reflective psychological notebook,” writes Sharon Hinsull of Counselling Directory.

Many people have so many feelings of hurt, stress, envy, anxiety and regret, but they rarely stop, think and make sense of them.

The Good Men Project

Habla Español? Hispanics face growing mental health care crisis

6 women share exactly why they "broke up" with their therapist.

Tags: Employment, Mental Health, Psychology, Race, Service, Support, Termination, Therapy, Treatment, Writing

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18-Jul-2019


Opinion: Doctors Privately Use Cruel Words to Describe Their Patients 

 

The language of medicine is rife with troubling terms. For instance, a medical note may read, “The patient denied skipping doses of the prescribed antibiotic though non-compliance is suspected…”. Both “denied” and “non-compliance” are medical-ese, and while their accusatory implications aren’t always intended, they nonetheless color patients, and their accounts, as unreliable and untrustworthy.

The solution would mean using empathetic, human-centered language. An alternative note might read, “Patient states they took all of their doses. I suspect that doses of medication have been missed, as clinical findings do not correlate with outcomes.” And this humane language could translate to better health outcomes: The medical provider might discover dementia, or personal or financial stressors impeding the patient’s ability to purchase or consume the recommended treatment.

Vice

Tags: Health, Judgment, Medical, Opinion, Training, Treatment, Writing

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28-May-2019


A LAB GREW A “MINI BRAIN” FROM THIS GUY’S CELLS. THEN THINGS GOT WEIRD. 

 

When science writer Philip Ball donated some flesh from his arm to a neuroscience lab growing “mini brains,” he originally intended to contribute to research into the biological mechanisms of dementia.

Instead, he ended up with a simplified genetic replica of his own brain growing in a petri dish — and found himself questioning what makes us human, according to a new review of Ball’s upcoming book published in Nature.

Futurism

Tags: Brain, Discovery, Science, Study, Writing

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13-May-2019


AirPods Are a Tragedy 

 

Future Relics is a column about the objects that our society is currently making, and how they may explain our lives to future generations. In each article, we'll focus on one item that could conceivably be discovered by someone 1,000 years from now, and try to explain where this item came from, where it's going, and what its existence explains about our current moment.

AirPods are a product of the past.

They're plastic, made of some combination of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, and sulfur. They’re tungsten, tin, tantalum, lithium, and cobalt.

The particles that make up these elements were created 13.8 billion years ago, during the Big Bang. Humans extract these elements from the earth, heat them, refine them. As they work, humans breathe in airborne particles, which deposit in their lungs. The materials are shipped from places like Vietnam, South Africa, Kazakhstan, Peru, Mexico, Indonesia, and India, to factories in China. A literal city of workers creates four tiny computing chips and assembles them into a logic board. Sensors, microphones, grilles, and an antenna are glued together and packaged into a white, strange-looking plastic exoskeleton.

These are AirPods. They’re a collection of atoms born at the dawn of the universe, churned beneath the surface of the earth, and condensed in an anthropogenic parallel to the Big Crunch—a proposed version of the death of the universe where all matter shrinks and condenses together. Workers are paid unlivable wages in more than a dozen countries to make this product possible. Then it’s sold by Apple, the world’s first trillion-dollar company, for $159 USD.

Vice

Tags: Environment, Nature, Opinion, Perception, Privilege, Science, Tech, Waste, Writing

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06-May-2019


Excerpt: Why are Giraffes mostly homosexual? 

 

Giraffes are beloved of evolutionary biologists for a number of reasons. They are, of course, the tallest of all living animals, and that elegant neck is the primary reason why. The origin of that beautiful neck has also been attributed to sexual selection. It is extravagant and slightly absurd, like a peacock’s tail, so it might be one of those runaway traits that we see exaggerated in males of so many sexual beasts. This is where the sex lives of giraffes gets interesting. The neck is certainly a major part of sexual and social behavior. Since 1958, the male-to-male wrestling that giraffes are often seen engaging in has been called “necking.” They curl their necks around each other and rut. It’s incredible to watch, the necks twisting and bending at almost right angles, the normal grace of these animals replaced by ungainly aggression and awkward legs, with none of the elegant power of two stags clashing antlers.

Queerty

Tags: Animals, Environment, Gay, Nature, Portrait, Science, Sex, Study, Writing

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25-Mar-2019


Cargill ground beef recall after E. coli outbreak kills 1, sickens 17 

 

More than 132,000 pounds of possibly tainted ground beef sold nationwide is being recalled in an E. coli outbreak that has killed one person and sickened 17 others, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said Wednesday.

Cargill Meat Solutions, a division of the nagribusiness giant Cargill, is recalling approximately 132,600 pounds of ground beef products made from the chuck portion of carcasses that may be contaminated with E. coli, the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service, or FSIS, said in a statement.

CBS News

Needle found in mango in latest chapter of Australia fruit crisis

Measles cases have hit a record high in Europe. Blame austerity.

Puppies to blame for drug-resistant infection in 118 people

Celebrated food researcher to step down after research is questioned

Tags: Advice, Animals, Backlash, Business, Choices, Clean, Cooking, Crime, Disease, Education, Environment, Finance, Food, Health, Meat, Medical, Medicine, Nature, Pets, Protest, Safety, Science, Study, Toxic, Treatment, Vaccine, Warning, World, Writing

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20-Sep-2018


Activist Dior Vargas Wants to Center People of Color in the Mental Health Conversation 

 

Mental health issues are not the sole domain of white people. Although that should be obvious, the media visibility afforded to communities of color around these issues—or lack thereof—doesn’t always reflect that. But Latina activist Dior Vargas has made it her mission to make people of color dealing with mental health issues more visible. Her voice is an important one as the mental health conversation moves forward in communities of color.

Vargas, 31, grew up in East Harlem, New York. From the age of 14, she’s been diagnosed with various mental health problems including major depression, anxiety, and borderline personality disorder. In 2014, wanting to add further focus to her activism and knowledge to her internal biblioteca, Vargas dug through the internet in search of accurate visual depictions of the multifarious, layered experience of mental health she well knows—but to little avail. Instead, she said, she was met with images of people who “nine times out of ten were white” in historical images, photographs of white women, or both.

Jezebel

Tags: Action, Education, Environment, Inclusion, Mental Health, Service, Social Media, Support, Women, Writing

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28-Aug-2018


Why We Shouldn’t Shield Children From Darkness 

 

Twice this past fall I was left speechless by a child.

The first time happened at an elementary school in Huntington, New York. I was standing on their auditorium stage, in front of a hundred or so students, and after talking to them about books and writing and the power of story, I fielded questions. The first five or six were the usual fare. Where do I get my ideas? How long does it take to write a book? Am I rich? (Hahahahaha!) But then a fifth-grade girl wearing bright green glasses stood and asked something different. “If you had the chance to meet an author you admire,” she said, “what would you ask?”

For whatever reason this girl’s question, on this morning, cut through any pretense that might ordinarily sneak into an author presentation. The day before, a man in Las Vegas had opened fire on concertgoers from his Mandalay Bay hotel room. Tensions between America and North Korea were reaching a boiling point. Puerto Ricans continued to suffer the nightmarish aftereffects of Hurricane Maria. I studied all the fresh-faced young people staring up at me, trying to square the light of childhood with the darkness in our current world.

Time

Tags: Children, Choices, Education, Environment, Inclusion, Mental Health, Nature, Parental Burden, Politics, Program, Service, Treatment, Writing

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09-Jan-2018




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