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Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Books'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Bogus Social Media Outrage Is Making Authors Change Lines in Their Books Now 

 

As described in an article in Publishers Weekly, readers on Instagram criticized Hilderbrand’s summer 2021 book, The Golden Girl, for a passage in which two teens, Vivi and Savannah, discuss plans for Vivi to hide out in the attic of Savannah’s house without Savannah’s parents’ knowledge: “You’re suggesting I hide here all summer?” Vivi asks. “Like … like Anne Frank?” The two friends laugh at this, but Vivi thinks to herself, “Is it really funny, and is Vivi so far off base?”

On an Instagram post in Hilderbrand’s publisher’s feed, a user who goes by the name “poursandpages” posted a comment (since deleted) denouncing this joke as “horrifically” antisemitic and demanding an apology. Others described themselves as “disgusted” and “gobsmacked in every way with the insensitivity” and accused Hilderbrand of thinking “antisemitism is funny.” After trying to put out these fires via DMs, Hilderbrand issued a formal apology and stated that the line would be removed from the book.

Bogus Social Media Outrage Is Making Authors Change Lines in Their Books Now

Tags: Books, Cancelled, Words

Permalink

08-Jun-2021


We Can Raise Boys To Become Good Men By Treating Them Like Girls 

 

When I was a kid in the 1970s, the “tomboy” was queen — or maybe king. Even a non-sporty girl like me was dressed in the unisex uniforms of white-piped track shorts, Keds, and t-shirts, just like my brother. The lesson I learned from my parents, peers, the media, and the passage of Title IX in 1972, was that I had legal right to everything culturally marked as “for boys.”

But the same access to girls’ worlds has still not been granted to boys. Despite the recent media focus on toxic masculinity, boys still feel insistent pressure to be violent, to shut down emotions, to watch porn, and to have sex even when they don’t want or aren’t ready to. They feel pressure to reject anything associated with what’s culturally marked as “feminine” — kindness, vulnerability, love, seeking help, let alone dolls and the color pink — and pressure to look down on girls and women. Boys learn that “girly” is an insult, and they must at all costs distance themselves from it.

We Can Raise Boys To Become Good Men By Treating Them Like Girls

Tags: Awareness, Books, Boy's Rights, Choices, Environment, Family, LGBTQ, NSFW, Opinion, Parental Burden, Sex, Writing

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10-Mar-2021


Cancel Culture’s Condescension Problem 

 

Culture-war obsessives believe it’s their responsibility to protect foolish people from themselves. What happened to individual freedom?

It’s troubling enough that those who wield cultural power have such a strong instinct to silence opponents and anathematize views with which they disagree — and that they so often get away with doing so rather forcibly.

But even more concerning is that, at root, this approach demonstrates deep disrespect for human freedom and resilience, as well as for each individual’s ability to choose how he wishes to encounter other views and decide his beliefs for himself.

Cancel Culture’s Condescension Problem

Tags: Art, Books, Education, Environment, Social Media, Termination

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05-Mar-2021


6 Dr. Seuss books to stop being published because of racist imagery 

 

'These books portray people in ways that are hurtful and wrong,' business says

6 Dr. Seuss books to stop being published because of racist imagery

Tags: Art, Ban, Books, Education, History, Parenting, Racial Tension

Permalink

02-Mar-2021


It’s the incendiary bloke-bashing bestseller the French tried to ban. Now, as it reignites the battle of the sexes here, FLORA GILL dares say... I admit it, I hate men 

 

There's many a woman who, after a dreadful first date or a bout of office mansplaining, has uttered the words ‘I hate men’.

I have often heard friends say that very thing. In fact, at some point in her life, I bet practically every woman has said it.

But if pressed on the point, many would add that, of course, they don’t really hate the opposite sex. After all, we have men in our lives we don’t hate — a brother, a father, a best friend.

So when a woman stands up and insists she really does hate men, it causes something of a stir.

I admit it, I hate men

Tags: Awareness, Books, Environment, Feminism, Hate, Men, Relationships, Release, Woman's Rights, Women In Charge

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12-Nov-2020


Oprah Winfrey: The 7 books that ‘help me through’ stressful times like these 

 

If you’re prone to doom-scrolling Twitter, or can’t take yet another stressful headline in the news, Oprah Winfrey has some suggestions on what books to read next.

Winfrey recently suggested seven books that are perfect to read right now, or during any stressful moment in life. She values these books “for their ability to inspire and comfort and enlighten,” she said in a video on her Instagram Monday.

“During these times, I know it’s hard sometimes to focus on anything because we’re so distracted by the roar of the news, not to mention the steady hum of our own anxiety,” Winfrey said.

But research has shown that reading can reduce your stress levels as effectively as other relaxation methods. Just six minutes of reading can lower your blood pressure and decrease other stress-related bodily responses, a 2009 study found.

From poetry to spirituality, here are the books that Oprah likes to “revisit time and again.”

Oprah Winfrey: The 7 books that ‘help me through’ stressful times like these

Tags: $, Books, Celebrity, Lockdown, Perception, Privilege

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31-Oct-2020


My History With Pleasure I am proud to say that I learned how to masturbate from a book. 

 

Having a baby inside me just does not compute with pleasure. They are two different and disparate things. Yet, I don’t feel this cognitive dissonance regarding sex during pregnancy. Sex, after all, is what makes babies in the first place. It’s natural and beautiful and, during pregnancy, it’s the only time in my life I’ve ever been able to stomach the label “making love.”Actually, I still can’t. BARF. But I don’t extend the same sentimentality to when I’m gettin’ down to a Pornhub video called “Schoolgirl slut sucks cock to get an A.” I know that all the books say that the womb’s rhythmic contractions don’t traumatize the fetus and actually “lull them to sleep.” But I dunno, what if this creates a bad habit? What if, for the rest of her life, my future daughter can only be soothed to sleep by the sound of someone gagging on a dick screaming, “Oh baby yes yes yes I now love science claaaaaaaass!”

My History With Pleasure I am proud to say that I learned how to masturbate from a book.

Tags: Anatomy, Awareness, Books, Children, Choices, Funny, Parenting, Portrait, Woman's Rights

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31-Oct-2020


'We should have the right not to like men': the French writer at centre of literary storm 

 

When Pauline Harmange, a French writer and aspiring novelist, published a treatise on hating men, she expected it to sell at the most a couple of hundred copies among friends and readers of her blog.

Instead, a threat by a government official to take legal action to ban Moi les hommes, je les déteste (I Hate Men) has made it a sellout. The first 450-copy print run was quickly snapped up, as was the following two reprints. Now 2,500 copies have been sold.

The publisher, Monstrograph, described as a “micropublishing house” run by volunteers, is overwhelmed and says I Hate Men will not be reprinted again unless a bigger publisher comes to the rescue.

Harmange, 25, is a mix of bemused and shell-shocked to find herself in the middle of a literary and political storm. “I didn’t expect this. It’s been an enormous surprise,” she told the Guardian from her home in Lille, northern France, where she lives with her husband, Mathieu, 29, and Eleven the cat. “It’s the first time I’ve had a book come out. I wrote a novel but it was never published.”

“I just don’t have confidence in them. This comes less from personal experience than from being an activist in a feminist organisation that helps the victims of rape and sexual assault for several years. I can state for a fact that the majority of aggressors are men.”

She added: “If we are heterosexual we are encouraged to like men, but we should absolutely have the right not to like them. I realise this sounds like a violent sentiment, but I feel strongly we should be allowed to not love them as a whole and make exceptions for certain men.”

'We should have the right not to like men': the French writer at centre of literary storm

Tags: Backlash, Books, Hate, Men, Women In Charge

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10-Sep-2020


Why men rape, in their own words: sex offenders in India and what makes it such a dangerous place for women 

 

A study conducted by the Thomson Reuters Foundation in 2018 ranked India as the world’s most dangerous country for women.

The issues examined included sexual violence and trafficking, gender-based social discrimination, lack of access to and control over contraception and childbirth, health care and maternal mortality rates. Mental and physical abuse, religious and cultural facets such as acid attacks, female infanticide, female genital mutilation, and forced and child marriages were also weighed.

Sexual violence against women is an absolute reality in many cultures around the world. In India, however, it is deeply rooted in patriarchal norms and the belief that men are superior to women and that a man should always be a protector of women.

During her interviews, Kaushal found that none of her nine subjects understood the meaning or necessity of consent from a female partner in a sexual relationship or respected them as individuals with their own unique identities. One of them, a serial gang rapist, even refused to accept the idea of rape.

Another subject, a doctor, raped a 12-year-old bedridden patient following an operation, in full awareness of the mental trauma he was causing. The attack left the patient crippled and incapable of talking about the assault for decades out of fear and shock.

Why men rape

Tags: Awareness, Books, Children, Environment, Equality, Freedom, Hostility, Humiliation, Investigation, Laws, Lifestyle, Men In Charge, Psychology, Rape, Safety, Sex, Violence, Woman's Rights, World

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15-Aug-2020


Why a generation is choosing to be child-free 


 

We are in the middle of a mass extinction, the first caused by a single species. There are 7.8 billion of us, on a planet that scientists estimate can support 1.5 billion humans living as the average US citizen does today. And we know that the biggest contribution any individual living in affluent nations can make is to not have children. According to one study, having one fewer child prevents 58.6 tonnes of carbon emissions every year; compare that with living car-free (2.4 tonnes), avoiding a transatlantic return flight (1.6), or eating a plant-based diet (0.82). Another study said it was almost 20 times more important than any other choice an environmentally minded individual could make. Such claims have been questioned. After all, does a parent really bear the burden of their child’s emissions? Won’t our individual emissions fall as technologies and lifestyles change? Isn’t measuring our individual carbon footprint – a concept popularised by oil and gas multinational BP – giving a free pass to the handful of corporate powers responsible for almost all carbon emissions? The only thing that isn’t up for debate is that we all know that we are living in ways that can’t continue.

Coronavirus isn’t likely to give us coronababies – but a pandemic isn’t the reason that having children has shifted from an inevitability to a choice, and now, a moral question. A long time ago, “Do we have children?” became “Should we?”

The Guardian

Florida now has more coronavirus cases than New York and California leads the nation

My Kids Want to Opt Out of In-Person Instruction This Fall

Palm Springs boy, 7, in coma with ‘hole in skull’ after cruel neighbor randomly hurls a rock at him

‘Monster’ gets 70 years for repeatedly abusing Buffalo woman, son

Tags: Action, Advice, Arrest, Attack, Awareness, Books, Children, Choices, Contamination, Coronavirus, Crime, Death, Education, Environment, Etiquette, Exclusivity, Future, Health, Illness, Injury, Investment, Lifestyle, Lockdown, Mental Health, Parental Burden, Parental Crime, Politics, Population Control, Preference, Pregnancy, Priorities, Sacrifice, Safety, Saving The Environment!, Science, Statistics, Survival, Women In Charge, World

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25-Jul-2020


How Tracy Sherrod Came to Lead America’s Oldest Black Publishing Imprint 

 

Lauren Michele Jackson recently wrote a piece for Vulture, looking at lists of Black texts that pop up whenever there’s a galvanizing incident of racial violence. A lot of the magazines and websites will publish a list like, here’s what to read to think about race. Jackson wrote. “Aside from the contemporary teaching texts, genre appears indiscriminately: essays slide against memoir and folklore, poetry squeezed on either side by sociological tomes. This, maybe ironically but maybe not, reinforces an already pernicious literary divide that books written by or about minorities are for educational purposes, racism and homophobia and stuff, wholly segregated from matters of form and grammar, lyric and scene.” I’d really like to hear your perspective on this, because you publish books about race, but you publish books about everything. Do you think readers should be looking at books as curative or as medicine for toxicity and racism in this culture?

Slate

Tags: Awareness, Books, Celebration, Choices, Education, Entertainment, History, Politics, Racism, Representation, Respect, Writing

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06-Jul-2020


Glennon Doyle thinks our kids suck. And it’s all our fault. 

 

New York Times bestselling author Glennon Doyle is unequivocal in her opinion on modern parenting.

In her new book Untamed, she describes how parents receive a ‘terrible memo’ from society as soon as our kids are born.

This memo says that our kids are our saviours and parenting them is akin to a religion. We must give them every opportunity possible and most importantly, we must never allow anything difficult to happen to them.

According to Glennon, not only does this disastrous memo make us parents feel exhausted, neurotic and guilty; but it is also the reason why our kids suck.

Ouch.

The reason our kids suck, she says, is because we no longer allow our children to learn how to lose, or to struggle, or to be rejected.

MamaMia

Tags: Advice, Awareness, Books, Family, Parental Crime, Parental Laziness, Psychology, Responsibility, Social Media, Training, Treatment, Unruly Child

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20-May-2020


Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome 

 

Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome: America's Legacy of Enduring Injury and Healing (PTSS) is a 2005 theoretical work by Joy DeGruy (née Leary).[1][2] PTSS describes a set of behaviors, beliefs and actions associated with or, related to multi-generational trauma experienced by African Americans that include but are not limited to undiagnosed and untreated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in enslaved Africans and their descendants.[1]

PTSS posits that centuries of slavery in the United States, followed by systemic and structural racism and oppression, including lynching, Jim Crow laws, and unwarranted mass incarceration, have resulted in multigenerational maladaptive behaviors, which originated as survival strategies. The syndrome continues because children whose parents suffer from PTSS are often indoctrinated into the same behaviors, long after the behaviors have lost their contextual effectiveness.

DeGruy states that PTSS is not a disorder that can simply be treated and remedied clinically but rather also requires profound social change in individuals, as well as in institutions that continue to reify inequality and injustice toward the descendants of enslaved Africans.

DeGruy holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Communication, a master's degree in Social Work, a master's degree in Clinical Psychology, and a Ph.D. in Social Work Research. She teaches social work at Portland State University and gives lectures on PTSS nationally and internationally.

Wiki

What is 'Post-traumatic slave syndrome'?

Tags: All Rights, Books, Environment, History, Opinion, Perception, Psychology, Race, Study, Treatment, World, Writing

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27-Jan-2020


Cyborgs will replace humans and remake the world, James Lovelock says 

 

For tens of thousands of years, humans have reigned as our planet's only intelligent, self-aware species. But the rise of intelligent machines means that could change soon, perhaps in our own lifetimes. Not long after that, Homo sapiens could vanish from Earth entirely.

That’s the jarring message of a new book by James Lovelock, the famed British environmentalist and futurist. “Our supremacy as the prime understanders of the cosmos is rapidly coming to end,” he says in the book, "Novacene." “The understanders of the future will not be humans but what I choose to call ‘cyborgs’ that will have designed and built themselves.”

NBC News

Tags: All Rights, Books, Environment, Future, Humanity, Intelligence, Nature, Population, Science, Writing

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26-Aug-2019


We are at the beginning of a global mental health revolution 
 

Access to mental health services has never been more critical -- no matter where you live. Mental health disorders are increasing globally, and depression is the leading cause of disability in the world. One in four of us will experience a mental illness at some point in our lives, according to the World Health Organization.

And many more are indirectly affected by disorders experienced by someone we love.

In the United States, mental disorders among children and adolescents have reached a crisis level, with the country experiencing its highest suicide rate in 50 years.

My interest in mental health started more than 50 years ago in front of a cotton mill in Atlanta. It was 1966, when my husband, Jimmy Carter, was running for governor. I stood outside the entrance of the factory early in the morning, waiting to give people brochures as they left the night shift. An older woman came out, looking weary from work. When I asked if she would be able to get some sleep, she told me she hoped so, but that she had a daughter who had a mental illness and needed care while the woman's husband was at his job.

CNN

‘Evil’ suicide forum encouraged woman to kill herself, relatives say

Does Reading Help Improve Mental Health?

Why I created a mental health app for African Americans

Tags: All Rights, App, Awareness, Books, Death, Education, Environment, Health, Lifestyle, Medical, Mental Health, News, Race, Reading, Recovery, Social Media, Suicide, Support, Treatment, Video

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30-May-2019




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