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Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Insurance'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Back Off, Mom
My mom thinks she’ll help care for my first child, but she couldn’t be more wrong. How do I make this clear? 
 

Dear Care and Feeding,

My husband and I want to have our first kid soon. Before we start trying, we need to figure out how to handle my mother.

We aren’t close at all. I maintain a polite relationship with her to minimize guilt trips and dramatics that arise when I keep the much-greater distance I would prefer. She’s learned that there will probably be a kid eventually, and she’s become obsessed with moving near me and being “Grandma’s Babysitting Service.” I’ve tried telling her that wouldn’t work for us, but she says, “You have no idea how hard it will be, especially after the second” or “Why have babies if you’re going to dump them at some day care?” or “You can’t afford good child care.”

We can afford day care, and while it’s expensive, more importantly, it’s not my mother. She was a big believer in corporal punishment and severe “Tiger Mom” parenting methods. I would never leave a kid with her unattended for even a few minutes.

We have major differences in values, and she thinks it’s her responsibility that her grandchildren participate in her religion (she embraces its most judgmental and hateful aspects), which is unacceptable to my husband and me. I don’t want her “help” raising my child, and I don’t want to deal with her guilt trips, unsolicited advice, and other intrusions into the happy and stable life I’ve built for myself.

She claims all her friends live near their grandbabies and take care of them when the parents have to go to work, and that it’s not fair that she might not get to do the same. She has started looking at homes in our area (where she knows no one but us), and, as she can’t afford to live in the city, she’s started telling us to move to the suburbs and get a house with enough room for her to live with us. This is not happening. Is there a way to handle this short of full estrangement while she’s living in a fantasy world and not my metro area?

Slate

Dad murdered autistic sons by driving off pier: prosecutors

Tags: $, Advice, Children, Death, Family, Hate, Insurance, Mental Health, Murder, Parental Burden, Parental Crime, Protections, Safety, Seniors, Treatment

Permalink

18-Jul-2019


Low-Wage Workers Are Being Sued for Unpaid Medical Bills by a Nonprofit Christian Hospital That Employs Them 

 

This year, a Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare housekeeper left her job just three hours into her shift and caught a bus to Shelby County General Sessions Court.

Wearing her black and gray uniform, she had a different kind of appointment with her employer: The hospital was suing her for unpaid medical bills.

In 2017, the nonprofit hospital system based in Memphis sued the woman for the cost of hospital stays to treat chronic abdominal pain she experienced before the hospital hired her.

She now owes Methodist more than $23,000, including around $5,800 in attorney’s fees.

It’s surreal, she said, to be sued by the organization that pays her $12.25 an hour. “You know how much you pay me. And the money you’re paying, I can’t live on,” said the housekeeper, who asked that her name not be used for fear that the hospital would fire her for talking to a reporter.

Pro Publica

Tags: $, Abuse, All Rights, Employment, Greed, Health, Illness, Insurance, Medical, Poverty, Protection, Religion, Representation, Survival, Treatment

Permalink

08-Jul-2019


Most Americans own a pet but can’t afford to pay their $800 medical bill 

 

Nearly 70% of U.S. households own a pet, according to the American Pet Products Association, and most pet owners enjoy lavishing their loyal companions with products and services to give them a better life. Overall spending in the U.S. pet industry is increasing at about 4% a year, up from $66.75 billion in 2016 to nearly $70 billion a year today.

Yet as likely as it is that spending will continue to increase, it is also likely that 1 in 3 of these pets will need emergency veterinary treatment within any given year.

Unfortunately, emergency treatment oftentimes runs upward of $1,000 and sometimes much more. And for many pet owners, the urgency is unexpected. Tara Falcone, founder of ReisUP, recalls how her Labrador retriever, Ruger, racked up almost $25,000 in medical expenses over four years — first, when he tore both his ACLs while chasing deer in the backyard, then after he developed a rare form of bone cancer and needed to have part of his jaw removed.

CNBC

Dog Owners Need to Protect Pet's Paws in Summer Too: Texas Dog's Paw Pads Burned Off During Walk

Tags: $, Aging, Animals, Environment, Health, Injury, Insurance, Pets, Treatment

Permalink

20-Jun-2019


Patients’ Needs, Not Personal Beliefs, Come First in Health Care 

 

Since taking office, the Trump administration has launched a systematic attack on laws that exist to protect all of us from discrimination when we seek basic health care. Today, we’re taking them back to court over it.

Last month, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) resurrected a policy that allows health care providers — including hospitals, clinics, and doctors’ offices — to use their religious beliefs to withhold critical information and obstruct patient’s access to health care. In 2009, the ACLU challenged the original version of the rule. Ten years later, we filed a lawsuit to, once again, preserve access to evidence-based, nonjudgmental health care and ensure that medical standards — not religious belief — guide health care.

ACLU

The Worst Patients in the World

Tags: Abortion, All Rights, Awareness, Choices, Discrimination, Employment, Environment, Exclusivity, Health, Hostility, Inhumanity, Injury, Insurance, Interference, Judgment, Magic Splatter, Medical, Mental Health, Misrepresentation, New World Order, Parental Burden, Politics, Privilege, Protections, Religion, Treatment, Waste

Permalink

13-Jun-2019


Nursing facilities often discharge patients when co-pays kick in 

 

Skilled nursing facilities in the U.S. often discharge Medicare patients before daily co-payments kick in, according to a new U.S. study that suggests some patients may be sent home for financial reasons before they’re medically ready to leave.

Medicare, the U.S. health program for the elderly and disabled, pays the entire bill for post-hospital care provided by skilled nursing facilities for the first 20 days within a benefit period, researchers note in JAMA Internal Medicine. After that, most patients become responsible for a daily co-payment of more than $150.

To see how the start of co-payments might impact discharge timing, researchers examined data on more than 4.5million skilled nursing facility discharges from January 2012 through November 2016.

Overall, a total of 220,037 patients were discharged on day 20, more than the 131,558 sent home on day 19 and the 121,339 released on day 21. Compared to patients discharged on days 19 or 21, those sent home on day 21 were more likely to suffer from multiple chronic medical conditions, live in poor neighborhoods, and be racial or ethnic minorities, the study found.

Reuters

Tags: $, Aging, All Rights, Disabled, Employment, Environment, Health, Insurance, Poverty, Responsibility, Retirement, Safety, Treatment

Permalink

30-May-2019


Women today are more likely than their mothers to die in childbirth 

 

A few weekends ago, like many Americans, we thought about the mothers in our lives. We reflected on the milestones and the sacrifices. And with some measure of guilt, we thought about how it can be so easy to take our mothers for granted. Perhaps this is why experts are just beginning to notice that motherhood in the United States has become riskier and costlier today than it was a generation ago.

American women today are 50 percent more likely to die in childbirth than their mothers — risks that are three to four times higher for black women than white women. For every death, hundreds of women experience childbirth complications that bring them to the brink, and tens of thousands more suffer from preventable and under-treated chronic illnesses. Despite advances in modern medicine, the wellbeing of our nations mothers has been steadily getting worse as access to reproductive health care services has eroded.

The Hill

Tags: $, All Rights, Health, Insurance, Laws, Leaders, Medical, Poverty, Pregnancy, Responsibility, Safety, Study, Survival, Woman's Rights

Permalink

23-May-2019


Being too hard on yourself could lead to these debilitating disorders 

 

Do you feel like the fate of the world rests on your shoulders? As well as being stressful, that mindset may be affecting your mental health. A sense of over-responsibility is one trait that makes people vulnerable to developing obsessive-compulsive disorder or anxiety, according to a study published in the International Journal of Cognitive Therapy.

While it’s normal to feel anxious, and also to act in ways that one might casually describe as OCD – such as keeping your house spotlessly clean – it’s when these behaviors become persistent and intense that they develop from traits into disorders, researchers say.

The Ladders

How to support a partner who's experiencing mental health issues

Guest opinion: Our legislators must understand mental health better

How flying into an angry rage is a sign you could be seriously ill

Feel Like Your Antidepressants Stopped Working? Here’s What Could Be Happening.

Having Psoriasis May Increase The Risk Of Mental Health Disorders, New Research Shows

I started being as nice to myself as I am to my friends and it did absolute wonders for my mental health

City life damages mental health in ways we’re just starting to understand

FHE Health Announces Scholarships To Encourage More People To Enter The Addiction And Mental Health Field

Tags: Aging, Anger, Awareness, Disease, Drugs, Education, Employment, Family, Finance, Govt, Insurance, Mental Health, Psychology, Relationships, Scholarship, Study, Support, Survival, Training, Treatment

Permalink

13-May-2019


Patients Insured By Marketplace Health Plan Less Likely To Receive A Medical Appointment 

 

Among adults with mental health needs, those covered by Medicare or employer-sponsored health insurance have greater access to medical treatment, less out-of-pocket cost and are more likely to receive care than those seeking an appointment through an Affordable Care Act (ACA) Marketplace-sponsored plan, according to findings from researchers at Drexel University’s Dornsife School of Public Health. Their study, published in the May 2019 issue of Health Affairs, provides preliminary results on disparities among those experiencing psychological stress since the ACA became law in 2010.

The researchers used National Health Interview Survey data on adults experiencing mental illness. They looked at a dataset that included 4,500 Medicaid enrollees, 8,600 with employer-sponsored insurance and nearly 900 on a Marketplace plan, and measured access to treatment, specifically whether individuals received care in the previous 12 months and whether those patients could afford treatment.

Among those seeking mental health care during the previous 12 months, success was highest for those with employer coverage. Although 5 percent of those with employer-sponsored insurance and 9 percent of Medicaid patients reported trouble getting a mental health doctor appointment in the previous year, 12 percent of Marketplace-enrollees experienced this same trouble.

Bioengineer

Tags: Choices, Employment, Exclusivity, Finance, Health, Insurance, Mental Health, Privilege, Treatment

Permalink

09-May-2019


Your House Should Not Be Your Retirement Plan 

 

The average American is more likely to own a home than to have saved enough money for retirement. In fact, for many Americans, their house is their retirement plan: They’re counting on the value of that nest egg to fuel their golden years. But while real estate can be a good investment, it isn’t wise to rely on a house to fund your retirement. To explore why, Barron’s spoke with Teresa Ghilarducci, the Irene and Bernard L. Schwartz Chair in economic policy analysis in the Economics Department at the New School, and the author of How to Retire With Enough Money.

“You can’t eat your house a sandwich at a time,” she says.

Barrons

Tags: Aging, Choices, Economy, Finance, Home, Insurance, Interview, Opinion, Real Estate, Retirement, Seniors, Support, Survival, Tax

Permalink

30-Apr-2019


LGBT Community Has Poorer Health Outcomes, Assessment Finds 

 

"LGBT people experience the same stressors that anyone else does and when you add their internalized feelings and perceptions of discrimination, there are obvious implications for overall health," Stepleman says. "This assessment is meant to provide an overview, but it helps establish an important baseline and will help us look at the impact of minority stress on a lot of other health variables."

Minority stress describes chronically high levels of stress faced by members of minority groups and can be due to things like poor social support and low socioeconomic status. Many studies have shown that it can contribute to health problems like high blood pressure and anxiety.

Science Magazine

Here's the truth about the LGBTI community and ageism

Tags: Aging, All Rights, Community, Education, Employment, Environment, Fear, Health, History, Insurance, Laws, LGBTI Protections, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Nature, Politics, Safety, Sexual Harassment, Study, Suicide, Treatment

Permalink

25-Sep-2018


A Man Says His DNA Test Proves He’s Black, and He’s Suing 

 

In 2014, Ralph Taylor applied to have his insurance company in Washington State certified as a “disadvantaged business enterprise.” The DBE program at the U.S. Department of Transportation was originally designed to help minority- and woman-owned businesses win government contracts. So as proof of his minority status, Taylor submitted the results of a DNA test, estimating his ancestry to be 90 percent European, 6 percent indigenous American, and 4 percent sub-Saharan African.

Government officials reviewing Taylor’s application were not convinced. They saw that he looked white. They noted that he was unable to directly document any nonwhite ancestors. They doubted the underlying validity of the DNA test. And, most relevant to the purpose of the program, they found “little to no persuasive evidence that Mr. Taylor has personally suffered social and economic disadvantage by virtue of being a Black American.” They refused to certify his company. So Taylor decided to sue—out of principle, he says, because other business owners who look white have won DBE certification before. The Seattle Times first reported on the case in detail last week.

The Atlantic

Tags: Americans, Court, Discrimination, Environment, History, Inclusion, Insurance, Lifestyle, Misrepresentation, Pride, Privacy, Protections, Race, Safety, Treatment

Permalink

19-Sep-2018


State says seniors were abandoned during California wildfire 

 

Staff at two senior care centers abandoned residents during an evacuation as wildfires swept through Northern California last October, state officials said Thursday as they moved to revoke licenses from the Santa Rosa facilities and their top administrators. Nobody in either facility died.

A Department of Social Services complaint says more than 20 people would have died when a dementia facility burned to the ground if family members and emergency responders hadn't evacuated them after all staff left. The investigation says night staff members at Villa Capri were not trained in emergency procedures and had never practiced a fire drill. They could not find keys to a bus that could have sped evacuations.

At least three residents were never evacuated from another facility, Varenna, and workers who found them the next morning lied about it, the investigation found.

Both care centers are owned by Oakmont Senior Living, which called the allegations unfounded.

ABC News

Tags: Abuse, Aging, All Rights, Backlash, Choices, Dedication, Employment, Environment, Exclusivity, Health, Hypocrisy, Insurance, Investigation, Nature, No more Heroes, Privilege, Protections, Safety, Seniors, Support, Survival, Tragedy, Treatment

Permalink

07-Sep-2018


Student Loan Watchdog Quits, Says Trump Administration 'Turned Its Back' On Borrowers 

 

The federal official in charge of protecting student borrowers from predatory lending practices has stepped down.

In a scathing resignation letter, Seth Frotman, who until now was the student loan ombudsman at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, says current leadership "has turned its back on young people and their financial futures." The letter was addressed to Mick Mulvaney, the bureau's acting director.

In the letter, obtained by NPR, Frotman accuses Mulvaney and the Trump administration of undermining the CFPB and its ability to protect student borrowers.

"Unfortunately, under your leadership, the Bureau has abandoned the very consumers it is tasked by Congress with protecting," it read. "Instead, you have used the Bureau to serve the wishes of the most powerful financial companies in America."

npr

Tags: All Rights, Choices, Education, Employment, Environment, Finance, Govt, Instructional, Insurance, Modernization, New World Order, Support, Survival, Treatment, Youth

Permalink

27-Aug-2018


Republicans admit they’ll slash Medicare, Social Security to pay for their tax cuts 

 

Slowly but surely, Republicans that supported the trillion dollar Trump tax bill are revealing their true motivations: slashing Medicare and Social Security.

During a Sunday interview with CNBC’s John Harwood, Rep. Steve Stivers (R-OH) urged entitlement reform as the deficit continues to balloon as a result of the GOP tax cuts.

“I do think we need to deal with some of our spending,” Stivers said. “We’ve got try to figure out how to spend less.”

Think Progress

Tags: Aging, Backlash, Economy, Exclusivity, Finance, Govt, Greed, Hypocrisy, Insurance, Laws, New World Order, Program, Punishment, Sad, Safety, Support, Survival, Treatment, Waste

Permalink

21-Aug-2018


AI-Driven Dermatology Could Leave Dark-Skinned Patients Behind 

 

LaToya Smith was 29 years old when she died from skin cancer. The young doctor had gotten her degree in podiatry from Rosalind Franklin University, in Chicago, just four years prior, and had recently finished a medical mission in Eritrea. But a diagnosis of melanoma in 2010 meant she would work in private practice for only a year before her death.

As a black woman, LaToya reflected a stark imbalance in skin-cancer statistics in America. While fair-skinned people are at the highest risk for contracting skin cancer, the mortality rate for African Americans is considerably higher: Their five-year survival rate is 73 percent, compared with 90 percent for white Americans, according to the American Academy of Dermatology.

The Atlantic

Tags: All Rights, Choices, Disease, Environment, Health, Inclusion, Insurance, Medical, Modernization, Nature, Privilege, Science, Service, Skin, Tech, Treatment

Permalink

16-Aug-2018




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