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Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Privacy'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

You should cover your phone's selfie camera, too 

 

Take a look at your smartphone. Perhaps you're reading this story on it, and the device is planted firmly in your hands. Maybe you're on your laptop, and your phone is resting face up on your desk. Now, focus your attention on the phone's selfie camera. Try to imagine what's in its field of view.

Unless your phone's forward-facing camera has a cover on it, you may not be the only one with that picture in their mind — or on their computer screen. Unless, that is, you have a selfie-cam cover.

It wasn't long ago that the idea of covering a laptop webcam was considered "paranoid," as if to suggest that only the tinfoil-hat wearing would think such a measure necessary. That consensus began to shift, in part, when Mark Zuckerberg accidentally revealed that even the King of Sharing had tape obscuring the view from his laptop's camera.

There are real reasons to believe that hackers — both state actors and otherwise — gain access to innocent people's computer webcams. Just ask security researcher Patrick Wardle, whose work helped uncover a 13-year-old strain of Mac malware that was developed seemingly to spy on regular people through their webcams.

Mashable

Tags: Awareness, Choices, Environment, Perception, Privacy, Protection, Safety, Surveillance, Tech, Theft, Warning

Permalink

26-Jun-2019


Give up your password or go to jail: Police push legal boundaries to get into cellphones 

 

William Montanez is used to getting stopped by the police in Tampa, Florida, for small-time traffic and marijuana violations; it’s happened more than a dozen times. When they pulled him over last June, he didn’t try to hide his pot, telling officers, "Yeah, I smoke it, there's a joint in the center console, you gonna arrest me for that?"

They did arrest him, not only for the marijuana but also for two small bottles they believed contained THC oil — a felony — and for having a firearm while committing that felony (they found a handgun in the glove box).

Then things got testy.

As they confiscated his two iPhones, a text message popped up on the locked screen of one of them: “OMG, did they find it?”

NBC News

Tags: All Rights, Arrest, Crime, Laws, Police, Privacy, Protection, Tech

Permalink

08-Jun-2019


Should you text with your boss? 

 

Having your phone blow up with texts from your boss is enough to get your heart racing.

Text messages tend to carry a heavier sense of urgency than an email or instant message -- whether that's the intent or not.

While you might be comfortable texting in your personal life, not everyone is open to using it for workplace communications.

Managers and their employees should set expectations of how they prefer to communicate in and out of the office. Some workers might find texting easier than emails or phone calls, while others might find it too invasive.
People are sloppier and lazier when it comes to texting"

"Have a conversation to determine preferences and reach an agreement on when you are going to use what form of communication," said Marie McIntyre, a career coach and author of "Secrets to Winning at Office Politics."

CNN

Tags: Advice, Business, Employment, Environment, Mental Health, Policy, Privacy, Protection, Safety, Treatment

Permalink

24-May-2019


After Smart Lock Allegedly Traps Senior in Apartment, Tenants Sue for Physical Keys and Win 

 

Tenants at a property in New York City just struck a deal in what is both a wildly reasonable ask but also a crucial development at a time of increasing surveillance—their landlord has to give them physical keys to their building.

Five tenants in Hell’s Kitchen sued their landlord in March after the owners installed a Latch smart lock on the building last year. It is unlocked with a smartphone, and reportedly granted tenants access to the lobby, elevator, and mail room. But the group that sued their landlords saw this keyless entry as harassment, an invasion of privacy, and simply inconvenient.

“We are relieved that something as simple as entering our home is not controlled by an internet surveillance system and that because we will now have a mechanical key they will not be tracking our friends and our family,” 67-year-old tenant Charlotte Pfahl, who has lived in the building for 45 years, told the New York Post.

“It’s a form of harassment,” 72-year-old artist and tenant Mary Beth McKenzie told the Post in March. “What happens if your phone dies? I don’t want to be stuck on the street and I don’t want to be surveilled.”

Gizmodo

Tags: Environment, Locks, Privacy, Real Estate, Seniors, Surveillance, Tech, Treatment

Permalink

09-May-2019


Suffering in solitude: A quarter of Americans say they have no one to confide in about their problems - and most hide their real feelings from the people closest to them 

 

Nearly a quarter (24 percent) of Americans feel like they have no one to confide in – and 70 percent say they hold back how they really feel when sharing with a friend, partner or co-worker, according to a new survey.

Most (90 percent) of Americans say they downplay their emotions to avoid worrying or stressing out a loved one, according to the survey by OnePoll on behalf of BetterHelp, a web-based counseling service.

Researchers discovered that young people (age 18-30) are most likely to isolate themselves because they are uncomfortable talking about money, job stress, parents or friends with their significant other.

Daily Mail

Tags: Americans, Choices, Environment, Fear, Mental Health, Nature, Privacy, Psychology, Regiment, Relationships, Study, Support, Therapy, Treatment

Permalink

02-May-2019


Workers Love AirPods Because Employers Stole Their Walls 

 

Once upon a time, offices had walls inside them. They weren’t glass, like the conference rooms of 2019, but were made of drywall, and were usually painted a neutral color, like many of the walls you know and love. Over time, office walls gave way to cubicles. Now, for many office workers, the cubicles are also gone. There are only desks.

If you’re under 40, you might have never experienced the joy of walls at work. In the late 1990s, open offices started to catch on among influential employers—especially those in the booming tech industry. The pitch from designers was twofold: Physically separating employees wasted space (and therefore money), and keeping workers apart was bad for collaboration. Other companies emulated the early adopters. In 2017, a survey estimated that 68 percent of American offices had low or no separation between workers.

Get the latest issue now.

Subscribe and receive an entire year of The Atlantic’s illuminating reporting and expert analysis, starting today.

Now that open offices are the norm, their limitations have become clear. Research indicates that removing partitions is actually much worse for collaborative work and productivity than closed offices ever were. But something as expensive and logistically complicated as an office design is difficult to walk back, so, as Jeff Goldblum wisely intones in Jurassic Park, life finds a way. In offices where there are no walls, millions of workers have embraced a work-around to reclaim a little bit of privacy: wireless headphones.

The Atlantic

Tags: Employment, Environment, Interference, Modernization, Nature, Privacy, Privilege, Safety, Treatment

Permalink

26-Apr-2019


Amazon Used An AI to Automatically Fire Low-Productivity Workers 

 

Automation Station
This time, artificial intelligence is literally taking jobs.

Documents obtained by The Verge show how Amazon used a computer system to automatically track and fire hundreds of fulfillment center employees between for failing to meet productivity quotas — a grim glimpse of a future in which AI is your boss.

While not every decision was made by a computer system, the documents — including a signed letter by an Amazon attorney describing the system — reveal how deeply automated the process really is. It’s not clear whether Amazon is still using the system.

“Amazon’s system tracks the rates of each individual associate’s productivity,” reads the letter as quoted by The Verge, “and automatically generates any warnings or terminations regarding quality or productivity without input from supervisors.”

Futurism

Tags: Business, Employment, Environment, Judgment, Power, Privacy, Privilege, Protection, Safety, Tech, Treatment

Permalink

26-Apr-2019


What Is The Porn Block & How Will It Affect You? There Are Some Big Changes Coming 

 

In a bid to stop under-18s accessing pornographic websites, the government has announced that from July 15 age-checks will be introduced to commercial porn websites in the UK. The move has been dubbed the "porn block" and will require all sex websites that make money and run as businesses to introduce “robust” age verification procedures or risk facing a fine of up to £250,000 and being blocked by internet service providers. However, critics of the policy have said that teens will simply access porn in other ways, the loopholes are too large, and the changes may make little differences to big pornography platforms while putting smaller sex bloggers out of business.

While the porn block has come as a bit of a surprise for some it has actually been in the works for a long time, as the BBC reports. During the 2015 election the Conservative party pledged to introduce age-verification for online pornography if it won the election. It was also included in the Digital Economy Act 2017 and while it was supposed to be implemented in 2018 it has faced numerous delays.

The company that owns YouPorn and PornHub has developed the technology AgeID that will be used by those companies to verify the ages of its users. James Clark, Director of Communications at AgeID, told i-News, “first, a user can register an AgeID account using an email address and password, both of which are protected..." He continued:

“The user verifies their email address and then chooses an age verification option from our list of 3rd party providers, using options such as Mobile SMS, Credit Card, Passport, or Driving Licence.”

Bustle

Bisexuals will be the invisible victims in the imminent UK porn block

Tags: All Rights, App, Bi, Children, Entertainment, Environment, Exclusivity, Extinction, Finance, Interference, Laws, LGBTQ, Porn, Privacy, Punishment, Sex, Sex Work, Social Media, World

Permalink

25-Apr-2019


Teen Says Apple’s Facial Recognition Got Him Wrongfully Arrested 

 

Sounds About Right

A New York teen suing Apple for $1 billion claims its facial-recognition system falsely linked him to a series of thefts and caused him to be arrested for a crime he didn’t commit.

The twist: an Apple spokesperson told Gizmodo that such a facial recognition system doesn’t even exist. If Apple is telling the truth, it’s possible the lawsuit filed on Monday is based on mere speculation.

But even if that is the case, the suit still serves as evidence that American citizens find it easy to believe that one of the world’s biggest tech companies uses facial recognition to keep tabs on them.

Futurism

US AIRPORTS WILL SCAN 97% OF OUTBOUND FLYERS’ FACES WITHIN 4 YEARS

Tags: Arrest, Business, Court, Face Recognition, Finance, Privacy, Privilege, Program, Tech, Travel

Permalink

25-Apr-2019


Amazon Workers Are Listening to What You Tell Alexa 

 

Tens of millions of people use smart speakers and their voice software to play games, find music or trawl for trivia. Millions more are reluctant to invite the devices and their powerful microphones into their homes out of concern that someone might be listening.

Sometimes, someone is.

Amazon.com Inc. employs thousands of people around the world to help improve the Alexa digital assistant powering its line of Echo speakers. The team listens to voice recordings captured in Echo owners’ homes and offices. The recordings are transcribed, annotated and then fed back into the software as part of an effort to eliminate gaps in Alexa’s understanding of human speech and help it better respond to commands.

Bloomberg

Tags: Business, Employment, Environment, Privacy, Product, Tech

Permalink

11-Apr-2019


Passenger Who Said Suitcase Was Robbed and Filled With 'Airport Equipment' Just Took Wrong Bag 

 

American Airlines passenger Anna Knight claims to have been “robbed” of everything in her checked suitcase — but it wasn’t empty when she got it back.

After arriving at Miami International Airport on Wednesday evening, Knight says she retrieved her luggage from baggage claim, and opened her suitcase to find all of her belongings gone. But instead of finding the suitcase empty, it was allegedly stuffed with airline equipment, including harnesses, power strips, orange clothing items typically worn by crew members on the tarmac, and a pair of black work boots.

People

Tags: Business, Environment, Finance, Privacy, Safety, Travel

Permalink

25-Oct-2018


A Man Says His DNA Test Proves He’s Black, and He’s Suing 

 

In 2014, Ralph Taylor applied to have his insurance company in Washington State certified as a “disadvantaged business enterprise.” The DBE program at the U.S. Department of Transportation was originally designed to help minority- and woman-owned businesses win government contracts. So as proof of his minority status, Taylor submitted the results of a DNA test, estimating his ancestry to be 90 percent European, 6 percent indigenous American, and 4 percent sub-Saharan African.

Government officials reviewing Taylor’s application were not convinced. They saw that he looked white. They noted that he was unable to directly document any nonwhite ancestors. They doubted the underlying validity of the DNA test. And, most relevant to the purpose of the program, they found “little to no persuasive evidence that Mr. Taylor has personally suffered social and economic disadvantage by virtue of being a Black American.” They refused to certify his company. So Taylor decided to sue—out of principle, he says, because other business owners who look white have won DBE certification before. The Seattle Times first reported on the case in detail last week.

The Atlantic

Tags: Americans, Court, Discrimination, Environment, History, Inclusion, Insurance, Lifestyle, Misrepresentation, Pride, Privacy, Protections, Race, Safety, Treatment

Permalink

19-Sep-2018


Watch This Guy Plead His Case for Legal 'Genital Massages' to a City Council 

 

A few weeks ago, a guy named Chris wandered into a local Lawrence, Kansas, city council discussion about local bodywork licenses. Head bowed reverently over the podium with a prepared speech in hand, Chris stepped up and took a stand for something he apparently truly believed in: the right for massage therapists to give "genital massages."

Vice

Tags: Action, All Rights, America needs them too, Argument, Business, Choices, Employment, Health, Privacy, Safety, Service, Sex, Stepping Up, Therapy, Treatment, Video

Permalink

10-Jul-2018


Amazon Echo secretly recorded a family's conversation and sent it to a random person on their contact list 

 

The Echo device in your room could be secretly recording your conversation — and in some cases, could send it to a random person, according to a report from local Seattle TV network KIRO7.

That's what happened to a family in Portland, who had their conversation at home recorded and sent to a random person on their contact list.

CNBC

Tags: Abuse, Environment, Privacy, Tech

Permalink

24-May-2018


Wi-Fi security has been breached, say researchers 

 

At about 7AM ET this morning, researchers revealed details of a new exploit called KRACK that takes advantage of vulnerabilities in Wi-Fi security to let attackers eavesdrop on traffic between computers and wireless access points. The exploit, as first reported by Ars Technica, takes advantage of several key management vulnerabilities in the WPA2 security protocol, the popular authentication scheme used to protect personal and enterprise Wi-Fi networks. “If your device supports Wi-Fi, it is most likely affected,” say researchers.

So yeah, this is bad.

The United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team issued the following warning in response to the exploit:

Verge

Tags: Abuse, Advice, Environment, Privacy, Scam, Social Media, Study, Support, Tech, Treatment, Warning

Permalink

16-Oct-2017




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