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Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Aging'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Humans Can Reverse Their Biological Age, Shows a 'Curious Case' Study 

 

In a small, 1-year clinical trial published Thursday in the journal Aging Cell, nine participants took three common medications — growth hormone and two diabetes drugs — and reversed their biological age by 2-and-a-half years on average. Greg Fahy, Ph.D., lead author of the study and chief science officer of anti-aging therapeutics company Intervene Immune, tells Inverse that this research proves the concept that biological aging may not be unstoppable.

“One of the lessons that we can draw from the study is that aging is not necessarily something that is beyond our control,” he says. “In fact it seems that aging is largely controlled by biological processes that we may be able to influence.”

Inverse

Tags: Aging, Drugs, Health, Medical, Options, Science, Study, Treatment

Permalink

08-Sep-2019


Death rates increasing for U.S. adults aged 25 to 44: CDC 

 

Death rates are on the rise for young and middle-aged U.S. adults, with white and black people experiencing higher mortality than Hispanic people, according to new research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published Tuesday.

Between 2012 and 2017, the rates for white and black people aged 25 to 44 increased 21% each for both groups, while Hispanic people of the same age range saw a 13% rise.

Sally Curtin, a statistician at the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics and one of the report’s authors, said an uptick in suicides, homicides and drug overdoses contributed to the higher rates for the younger part of the group.

ABC News

Want to Raise a Hard-Working Child? Do These 6 Things

Tags: Advice, Aging, Death, Environment, Life Expectancy, Lifestyle, Opinion, Parental Burden, Parenting, Psychology, Safety, Study, Survival

Permalink

24-Jul-2019


Why American life expectancy is declining 

 

For the third year running, life expectancy in the U.S. has declined, per new data from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention.

Children born in 2017 are expected to live an average of 78.6 years, down from 78.7 the year prior. This most recent decline makes the last three years the longest period of decreasing life expectancy since the years of 1915 to 1918, USA Today reports. Considering that time period included World War I and the Spanish flu epidemic, those factors might at least partially explain the reduced life expectancy.

The Week

Tags: Aging, Environment, Health, Illness, Life Expectancy, Lifestyle, Parental Burden, Population, Responsibility, Science, Study, Survival

Permalink

09-Jul-2019


Most Americans own a pet but can’t afford to pay their $800 medical bill 

 

Nearly 70% of U.S. households own a pet, according to the American Pet Products Association, and most pet owners enjoy lavishing their loyal companions with products and services to give them a better life. Overall spending in the U.S. pet industry is increasing at about 4% a year, up from $66.75 billion in 2016 to nearly $70 billion a year today.

Yet as likely as it is that spending will continue to increase, it is also likely that 1 in 3 of these pets will need emergency veterinary treatment within any given year.

Unfortunately, emergency treatment oftentimes runs upward of $1,000 and sometimes much more. And for many pet owners, the urgency is unexpected. Tara Falcone, founder of ReisUP, recalls how her Labrador retriever, Ruger, racked up almost $25,000 in medical expenses over four years — first, when he tore both his ACLs while chasing deer in the backyard, then after he developed a rare form of bone cancer and needed to have part of his jaw removed.

CNBC

Dog Owners Need to Protect Pet's Paws in Summer Too: Texas Dog's Paw Pads Burned Off During Walk

Tags: $, Aging, Animals, Environment, Health, Injury, Insurance, Pets, Treatment

Permalink

20-Jun-2019


Trump’s New Rule Could Effectively Allow Discrimination Based on Race and Age 

 

A new Trump administration proposal would change the civil rights rules dictating whether providers must care for patients who are transgender or have had an abortion. While news stories have mainly focused on how the proposal might affect LGBTQ rights and abortion rights, the sweeping proposal has implications for all Americans, because the Department of Health and Human Services seeks to change how far civil rights protections extend and how those protections are enforced.

Vice

Tags: Aging, All Rights, Environment, Finance, Health, LGBTQ, Medical, Policy, Politics, Protections, Punishment, Safety, Self Interest, Woman's Rights

Permalink

11-Jun-2019


Poll: Some younger workers view aging workforce negatively 

 

Some younger workers aren't particularly thrilled to see a rising share of older Americans forgo retirement and continue working, according to a recent poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

The poll found that workers under the age of 50 were significantly more likely to view America's aging workforce as a negative development when compared with their older counterparts. About 4 in 10 respondents ages 18 to 49 and 44% of the youngest respondents ages 18 to 29 said they consider the trend to be a bad thing for American workers. Just 14% of those age 60 and over said the same.

ABC News

Tags: $, Aging, Employment, Environment, Exclusivity, Judgment, Poll, Seniors, Treatment, Youth

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06-Jun-2019


Nursing facilities often discharge patients when co-pays kick in 

 

Skilled nursing facilities in the U.S. often discharge Medicare patients before daily co-payments kick in, according to a new U.S. study that suggests some patients may be sent home for financial reasons before they’re medically ready to leave.

Medicare, the U.S. health program for the elderly and disabled, pays the entire bill for post-hospital care provided by skilled nursing facilities for the first 20 days within a benefit period, researchers note in JAMA Internal Medicine. After that, most patients become responsible for a daily co-payment of more than $150.

To see how the start of co-payments might impact discharge timing, researchers examined data on more than 4.5million skilled nursing facility discharges from January 2012 through November 2016.

Overall, a total of 220,037 patients were discharged on day 20, more than the 131,558 sent home on day 19 and the 121,339 released on day 21. Compared to patients discharged on days 19 or 21, those sent home on day 21 were more likely to suffer from multiple chronic medical conditions, live in poor neighborhoods, and be racial or ethnic minorities, the study found.

Reuters

Tags: $, Aging, All Rights, Disabled, Employment, Environment, Health, Insurance, Poverty, Responsibility, Retirement, Safety, Treatment

Permalink

30-May-2019


What's Your Purpose? Finding A Sense Of Meaning In Life Is Linked To Health 

 

Having a purpose in life may decrease your risk of dying early, according to a study published Friday.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 7,000 American adults between the ages of 51 and 61 who filled out psychological questionnaires on the relationship between mortality and life purpose.

What they found shocked them, according to Celeste Leigh Pearce, one of the authors of the study published in JAMA Current Open.

People who didn't have a strong life purpose — which was defined as "a self-organizing life aim that stimulates goals" — were more likely to die than those who did, and specifically more likely to die of cardiovascular diseases.

npr

Tags: Aging, Dedication, Environment, Happiness, Health, Life Expectancy, Mental Health, Nature, Poll, Seniors

Permalink

25-May-2019


Men also have a ‘biological clock’ that poses serious health risks: study 

 

The battle of the sexes just got a lot more equalized.

A new study out of Rutgers University finds that men have a ticking “biological clock” — just like women — and if they make babies in their 40s it can negatively impact the health of their partners and progeny.

“While it’s widely accepted that physiological changes that occur in women after 35 can affect conception, pregnancy and the health of the child, most men don’t realize their advanced age can have a similar impact,” says study author Gloria Bachmann, director of the Women’s Health Institute at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, in a statement.

The number of infants born to dads aged 45-plus spiked 10 percent in the US over the past four decades, likely due to assisted reproductive technology. Bachmann analyzed the effect of “advanced parental age” — brace yourself: it ranges from 35 to 45 — on fertility, pregnancy and the health of children for her study published in the journal Maturitas.

Guys who start siring spawn later in life put their lovers at risk for increased pregnancy complications such as gestational diabetes, preterm birth and preeclampsia. Plus, the resulting babies were found to be at higher risk of premature birth, late-term still birth, low Apgar scores and birth weight, higher incidence of newborn seizures and birth defects such as congenital heart disease and cleft palate.

NY Post

Tags: Aging, Children, Environment, Health, Maturity, Men, Mental Health, Nature, Parenting, Science

Permalink

14-May-2019


Being too hard on yourself could lead to these debilitating disorders 

 

Do you feel like the fate of the world rests on your shoulders? As well as being stressful, that mindset may be affecting your mental health. A sense of over-responsibility is one trait that makes people vulnerable to developing obsessive-compulsive disorder or anxiety, according to a study published in the International Journal of Cognitive Therapy.

While it’s normal to feel anxious, and also to act in ways that one might casually describe as OCD – such as keeping your house spotlessly clean – it’s when these behaviors become persistent and intense that they develop from traits into disorders, researchers say.

The Ladders

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Having Psoriasis May Increase The Risk Of Mental Health Disorders, New Research Shows

I started being as nice to myself as I am to my friends and it did absolute wonders for my mental health

City life damages mental health in ways we’re just starting to understand

FHE Health Announces Scholarships To Encourage More People To Enter The Addiction And Mental Health Field

Tags: Aging, Anger, Awareness, Disease, Drugs, Education, Employment, Family, Finance, Govt, Insurance, Mental Health, Psychology, Relationships, Scholarship, Study, Support, Survival, Training, Treatment

Permalink

13-May-2019


Porn That Takes Senior Sex Seriously 

 

Bonnie and Joel have known each other for over half a century. Now, they’re filming their very first porno.

They sit on a white leather couch, backlit by the Southern California sun, and gaze romantically at each other. “I could spend all day just looking into your eyes,” she says, a boom and mic hovering overhead. A camera pans their torsos, capturing wandering hands. Bonnie, 70, strokes Joel’s long, white mane, which has been pulled into a low ponytail. Joel, 69, runs his fingers through her closely cropped silver hair.

The kissing begins, with pointed pauses for eye contact, face nuzzling, and laughter—but then Bonnie pulls back. “I’m uncomfortable,” she says as a straightforward statement of fact. “First of all, I’m too hot.” Bonnie slowly shrugs a pink cotton robe off her shoulders, revealing a black lace bra from Target, and shifts her position. She has fibromyalgia and her back has been acting up today.

The camera keeps rolling because this is exactly what the film crew is here to capture: two people navigating the vicissitudes of sex and aging.

Jezebel

Tags: Aging, Education, Inclusion, Porn, Portrait, Seniors, Sex

Permalink

07-May-2019


Your House Should Not Be Your Retirement Plan 

 

The average American is more likely to own a home than to have saved enough money for retirement. In fact, for many Americans, their house is their retirement plan: They’re counting on the value of that nest egg to fuel their golden years. But while real estate can be a good investment, it isn’t wise to rely on a house to fund your retirement. To explore why, Barron’s spoke with Teresa Ghilarducci, the Irene and Bernard L. Schwartz Chair in economic policy analysis in the Economics Department at the New School, and the author of How to Retire With Enough Money.

“You can’t eat your house a sandwich at a time,” she says.

Barrons

Tags: Aging, Choices, Economy, Finance, Home, Insurance, Interview, Opinion, Real Estate, Retirement, Seniors, Support, Survival, Tax

Permalink

30-Apr-2019


Forget That Social Security Increase, Seniors Are in Trouble. Here’s Why. 

 

You might have heard that Social Security checks are going up 2.8% this year, the biggest rise in seven years. That translates into an average benefit of $1,461 a month, up $39.

While welcome, it’s necessary to remember that the increase is tied to inflation. Higher payouts will simply enable retirees to keep up with the rising cost of living. It doesn’t mean that anyone’s standard of living will go up—as if an extra $1.28 a day will do much in the first place. Think of a treadmill: You’re not going anywhere.

In fact, retirees and those who are eyeing retirement risk going in a different direction: backward. A study by the Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis at the New School finds that about 40% of middle-class Americans will live close to or in poverty by the time they reach age 65. “Golden years?” For millions, it’s doubtful.

Barrons

Tags: Aging, Economy, Finance, Poverty, Retirement, Seniors, Social Security, Study, Support, Survival

Permalink

22-Apr-2019


People's Brains Don't Reach Adulthood Until Age 30, Study Finds 

 

There's a good reason why managing adult responsibilities only became somewhat bearable in your 30s, according to researchers.

Although anyone over 18 years old is considered an adult, scientists argue that our brains don't mature that quickly, The Independent reports. Speaking at a meeting of the Academy of Medical Sciences in Oxford in London, researchers explained that our brains slowly transition to adulthood, which is finally reached in our 30s.

“What we’re really saying is that to have a definition of when you move from childhood to adulthood looks increasingly absurd,” professor Peter Jones, a neuroscientist at the University of Cambridge, explained at the meeting. “It’s a much more nuanced transition that takes place over three decades."

Men's Health

Tags: Aging, Brain, Environment, Maturity, Mental Health, Science, Study

Permalink

20-Mar-2019


Robotic Pets Are Helping Dementia Patients 

 

Video.

Vice

Tags: Aging, Disease, Environment, Mental Health, Pets, Tech, Therapy, Treatment, Video

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19-Mar-2019




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