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Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Therapy'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Three Things People Say That Annoy Psychologists 

 

I often dread telling people I’m a psychologist, particularly outside of the office. Although I’m proud of my profession, I know that people often hold stereotypes and misgivings about what I do. These can be based on negative personal experiences with the field.

As a result of these influences, people often say things to psychologists that I’ve heard many of my colleagues characterize as “annoying.” Personally, however, I’m glad they say them. It gives us a chance to address their questions and concerns. In that spirit, here are three things that people say that sometimes annoy psychologists and some facts about the field to go along with each one.

1. “Are you analyzing me?”

Three Things People Say That Annoy Psychologists

The 240 shocking texts a female psychologist sent a 17-year-old client who she had sex with

Tags: Employment, Hate, List, Mental Health, Minors, Psychology, Sex, Therapy, Treatment

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14-Sep-2021


 

Do we really need mental experts that have solved nothing in their lives to tell us how to live ours? We eat their shit and spread it but nothing happens. Dude! We're still insane! 13-Jun-2021

Tags: Fail, Parody, Psychology, Therapy

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13-Jun-2021


Writing as Therapy  

 

Writing therapy is the cheapest and easily accessible form of therapy.

People have used writing as a medium for emotional expression for ages.

Directed writing can be your own version of therapy.

The concept of writing as therapy was first introduced by New York psychologist Dr Ira Progoff in the mid-1960s.

“As a practising psychotherapist who had studied under Carl Jung, Progoff developed what he called the Intensive Journal Method, a means of self-exploration and personal expression based on the regular and methodical upkeep of a reflective psychological notebook,” writes Sharon Hinsull of Counselling Directory.

Many people have so many feelings of hurt, stress, envy, anxiety and regret, but they rarely stop, think and make sense of them.

The Good Men Project

Habla Español? Hispanics face growing mental health care crisis

6 women share exactly why they "broke up" with their therapist.

Tags: Employment, Mental Health, Psychology, Race, Service, Support, Termination, Therapy, Treatment, Writing

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18-Jul-2019


From the Straight Spouse’s Perspective of a Gay Man Having an Affair 

 

My husband is having an affair with a man. We have four young children. He moved out quickly after I discovered the relationship. I am worried about him and I don’t know how to make this better for him and for us. His kids miss him. I honestly thought we had a happy and loving marriage. Do you have any advice for me? Or for him?

Thank you for sending your question, and I’ve written a lot about how the gay spouse proceeds through this process. I only occasionally hear from women or men who have been left behind. So in this response, I’m going to focus on you and them.

The Good Men Project

Tags: Advice, All Rights, Children, Choices, Gay, Lifestyle, Marriage, Mental Health, Parental Burden, Support, Therapy, Treatment

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24-May-2019


The Shame-Free Guide to Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder 

 

Sexual desire is a largely misunderstood aspect of our sexual health. It’s stigmatized and pathologized on both ends: whether you have no appetite or an extremely high desire to have sex, it’s seen as problematic. All of that can make it feel really overwhelming to reach out for help when something might actually be out alignment with your libido. Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is a persistent or recurring lack of sexual fantasies and appetite for sex which is causing the patient distress and can’t be accounted for as a symptom of another illness.

It can be difficult to diagnose HSDD as there is no baseline “norm” for sexual desire across the spectrum — you have to feel out where your level of desire feels nourishing. Everyone is different when it comes to how they experience sexual desire and it’s perfectly normal for your libido to ebb and flow throughout your life. Juliet Widoff, an OBGYN at Callen-Lorde, says screenings for HSDD should happen regularly, as “it is a disorder that can cause a significant amount of personal and interpersonal distress and, because there is a great deal of shame and stigma surrounding it, patients may not be forthcoming regarding their symptoms.”

Allure

Tags: Education, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Nature, Science, Sex, Study, Therapy, Training, Treatment

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23-May-2019


I had to "break up" with my therapist because finding effective mental health care isn't easy 

 

When an acquaintance offered to pay for my therapy, I was so grateful for the opportunity to get the help I needed. But, after just three sessions, I had to call it quits.

A lot had happened before I started my search for therapy. In 2015, I failed to secure a visa that would have allowed me to work at possibly one of the most highly-reputed companies in Africa. When I first received the job offer, I thought that, finally, I had achieved some semblance of comforting stability in my life. Achieving permanent employment had been a rollercoaster ride—but my whole life has been a rollercoaster ride. Often, it has been one with more downs than ups after surviving sexual abuse, emotional abuse, a dysfunctional family, and financial challenges. It’s been overwhelming, for me and for my loved ones caught in the ride.

So you can imagine how relieved I felt when I got the job because I could finally fend for myself. You can probably also imagine how I felt when my application for a work visa was denied.

Hello Giggles

Nothing Comes Before My Mental Health: 5 Lessons I Learned After Treatment

Tidying Up: What Cleanliness Says About Your Mental Health

Arianna Huffington: It’s Time to Prioritize Our Mental Health in Our Everyday Lives

Tags: Clean, Environment, Family, Instructional, Judgment, Mental Health, Portrait, Privilege, Race, Recovery, Relationships, Respect, Superficiality, Therapy, Treatment, Women

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03-May-2019


Suffering in solitude: A quarter of Americans say they have no one to confide in about their problems - and most hide their real feelings from the people closest to them 

 

Nearly a quarter (24 percent) of Americans feel like they have no one to confide in – and 70 percent say they hold back how they really feel when sharing with a friend, partner or co-worker, according to a new survey.

Most (90 percent) of Americans say they downplay their emotions to avoid worrying or stressing out a loved one, according to the survey by OnePoll on behalf of BetterHelp, a web-based counseling service.

Researchers discovered that young people (age 18-30) are most likely to isolate themselves because they are uncomfortable talking about money, job stress, parents or friends with their significant other.

Daily Mail

Tags: Americans, Choices, Environment, Fear, Mental Health, Nature, Privacy, Psychology, Regiment, Relationships, Study, Support, Therapy, Treatment

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02-May-2019


19 Psychiatric Medications to Power Up Your Mental Health 

 

There are lots of different medications out there to power up your mental health—but what do they all do? Here, David Hellerstein, M.D., a research psychiatrist and professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center, breaks down the different classes of mental health meds.

Anxiety is a disorder, but it can also be a symptom of another disorder, like depression, that could be treated with a nonaddictive medicine, says Dr. Hellerstein. And conditions such as panic disorders may be masked while taking certain antianxiety meds, particularly benzodiazepines. Many who are put on these medications might benefit from relaxation training, yoga, CBT, or an antidepressant instead, Dr. Hellerstein adds.

Benzodiazepines
In addition to anxiety, benzos can also be helpful for insomnia and depression. They bind to the same brain receptors as alcohol, and they can be addictive if used regularly. Check whether your anxiety could be a symptom of another disorder.

Men's Health

Power Up Your Mental Health

Tags: Drugs, Medicine, Mental Health, Therapy, Treatment

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01-May-2019


How to Find a LGBTQ-Affirming Therapist 

 

Finding the right therapist—someone you trust, someone you like, someone you click with—is important for anyone to ensure their therapy is effective. But for those who identify as LGBTQ, finding a therapist who is LGBTQ or LGBTQ-affirming is critical for creating a safe, supportive space.

Rosemary Donahue writes for Them that after a taking a decade-long break from awful, ineffective experiences with therapy, she realized that finding an LGBTQ-affirming therapist might be the key.

So Donahue collected a variety of resources for others in the queer community who may be in need (or want) of an LGBTQ or -affirming therapist.

Life Hacker

Tags: Advice, Environment, LGBTQ, Mental Health, Support, Therapy, Treatment

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30-Apr-2019


Are We Ready For An Implant That Can Change Our Moods? 

 

Our thoughts and fears, movements and sensations all arise from the electrical blips of billions of neurons in our brain. Streams of electricity flow through neural circuits to govern these actions of the brain and body, and some scientists think that many neurological and psychiatric disorders may result from dysfunctional circuits.

As this understanding has grown, some scientists have asked whether we could locate these faulty circuits, reach deep into the brain and nudge the flow to a more functional state, treating the underlying neurobiological cause of ailments like tremors or depression.

The idea of changing the brain for the better with electricity is not new, but deep brain stimulation takes a more targeted approach than the electroconvulsive therapy introduced in the 1930s. DBS seeks to correct a specific dysfunction in the brain by introducing precisely timed electric pulses to specific regions. It works by the action of a very precise electrode that is surgically inserted deep in the brain and typically controlled by a device implanted under the collarbone. Once in place, doctors can externally tailor the pulses to a frequency that they hope will fix the faulty circuit.

npr

Tags: Brain, Mental Health, Science, Tech, Therapy, Treatment

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30-Mar-2019


Giving Parents Therapy Can Help Their Anxious Children 

 

On March 13, the New York Times’s Upshot published results from a survey on parenting that found that moms and dads are still very involved in aspects of their grown children’s lives.

76 percent of parents “reminded their adult children of deadlines they need to meet, including for schoolwork,” 74 percent “made appointments for them, including doctor’s appointments, 15 percent “called or texted to make sure they did not sleep through a class or test,” while 14 percent “told them which career to pursue.” This kind of parenting can backfire, the article wrote, “by leaving young adults ill-prepared for independent adult life.”

Tonic

Tags: Anxiety, Children, Environment, Mental Health, Opinion, Parental Burden, Parenting, Study, Therapy, Treatment, Youth

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15-Mar-2019


PSYCHEDELIC MUSHROOMS CAN BOOST CREATIVITY AND EMPATHY FOR A WEEK 

 

The benefits of taking psychedelics could last long after the trip ends.

A team of Dutch researchers has found that psilocybin, the active ingredient in psychedelic mushrooms, doesn’t just increase a person’s creativity, empathy, and feeling of well-being while a user trips. It also allows them to experience all of those benefits for up to seven days — providing valuable insight into how we could tap into the therapeutic value of hallucinogenics.

Futurism

Tags: Drugs, Mental Health, Nature, Science, Study, Therapy, Treatment

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08-Mar-2019


The Science of Personality Tests Actually Tells You Less About Yourself 
 

Have you ever clicked on a link like “What does your favorite animal say about you?” wondering what your love of hedgehogs reveals about your psyche? Or filled out a personality assessment to gain new understanding into whether you’re an introverted or extroverted “type”? People love turning to these kinds of personality quizzes and tests on the hunt for deep insights into themselves. People tend to believe they have a “true” and revealing self hidden somewhere deep within, so it’s natural that assessments claiming to unveil it will be appealing.

As psychologists, we noticed something striking about assessments that claim to uncover people’s “true type.” Many of the questions are poorly constructed — their wording can be ambiguous and they often contain forced choices between options that are not opposites. This can be true of BuzzFeed-type quizzes as well as more seemingly sober assessments.

Inverse

Tags: Choices, Education, Mental Health, Nature, Science, Study, Therapy, Treatment

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24-Sep-2018


Masturbation Matters: 15 Better Ways to Get Off 

 

A good jack-off falls somewhere between agony and prayer. In the shower, I make the same face Mary makes in Bernini sculptures. Panting, my face against the door, I nearly whisper, “Thank you, lord.”

Some people consider masturbation a second-tier sexual experience. We’ve all heard the “sad jack-off story.” After a night of fruitless cruising, your buddy settled for his hand.

There is a problem in the way we talk about self-pleasure. Self-care is often seen as shameful, embarrassing, or unimportant in our social-obsessed culture. But self-pleasure is something nearly everyone does, something everyone should do, and something we could all do better. Masturbation matters because your body matters. Because pleasure is healthy.

Let me lend a hand. Browse these 15 ways to get the most out of your solo time.

Advocate

Tags: All Rights, Dedication, Entertainment, Environmentalist, Health, Instructional, Men, Mental Health, Nature, Safety, Service, Sex, Support, Therapy, Treatment

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16-Aug-2018


Watch This Guy Plead His Case for Legal 'Genital Massages' to a City Council 

 

A few weeks ago, a guy named Chris wandered into a local Lawrence, Kansas, city council discussion about local bodywork licenses. Head bowed reverently over the podium with a prepared speech in hand, Chris stepped up and took a stand for something he apparently truly believed in: the right for massage therapists to give "genital massages."

Vice

Tags: Action, All Rights, Argument, Business, Choices, Employment, Health, Privacy, Safety, Service, Sex, Stepping Up, Therapy, Treatment, Video

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10-Jul-2018




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