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All Posts Tagged as 'Pests'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Chicago is the 'rattiest city' in America for the sixth year in a row 

 

Chicago is the six-time holder of a title that no city wants.

For the sixth year in a row, Chicago is the country's "rattiest city."

The Windy City has topped the list of the rattiest cities in the United States for the sixth year in a row.

Orkin, an Atlanta-based pest control service, ranks US cities based on the number of new rodent treatments from September 1 to August 31 of each year. The result is a list of 50 cities, with most changing spots each time the list is updated. Chicago, however, is still No. 1.

"Rodents are experts at sniffing out food and shelter, and they're resilient in their ways to obtain both," Ben Hottel, an Orkin entomologist, said in the company's press release. "Residential properties offer the ideal habitat for rodents, and once they've settled in, they're capable of reproducing rapidly and in large quantities."

Efforts to tame the city's rat population have been going on for years. Chicago's "war on rats" escalated with the introduction of a new rat task force back in 2016. Residents had even begun adopting cats to squash their numbers.

Chicago is the 'rattiest city' in America for the sixth year in a row

Tags: Animals, Breeding, Choices, Contagion, Contamination, Entertainment, Evolution, Health, Lifestyle, Neglect, Pests, Population Control, Safety, Supremacy

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

17-Oct-2020


Massive pack of hungry raccoons taking over San Francisco park 

 

A pack of masked “bandits” is marauding in a San Francisco park.

The group of 14 raccoons emerged from the bushes at Golden Gate Park on Thursday, startling a father and son who snapped a picture of the bizarre scene, SFGate reports.

“It was so surreal…a posse of bandits…like out of a movie,” the dad, Marc Estoque told the outlet. “And then two minutes later there was a coyote. I was waiting for the unicorn to pop out.”

Massive pack of hungry raccoons taking over San Francisco park

Tags: Animals, Environment, Food, Health, Pests, Terraforming, Threat, Warning

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

25-Sep-2020


Rats Plague Outdoor Seating at NYC Restaurants 

 

New York City restaurant owners already struggling with limited business are now facing another issue: rats.

With indoor dining put on hold indefinitely due to COVID-19, outdoor dining is the only other option, aside from takeout and delivery, restaurant owners like Giacomo Romano have to keep their business afloat. But the owner of Ciccio, an Italian restaurant in SoHo, says the sanitation of a nearby park is contributing to a recurring problem of rats.

Father Fagan Park is small and inviting to skateboarders and people who want to relax outdoors, but it's also attracting huge rats. Romano says he has appealed to city leaders for help.

NBC

Bay Area restaurant cited for employees not wearing masks

Michigan Businesses Required To Deny Entry To Customers Refusing To Wear Masks

Tags: Animals, Clean, Contamination, Coronavirus, Environment, Fear, Health, Masks, Nature, Pests, Policy, Politics, Restaurant, Safety, Terraforming

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

10-Jul-2020


Is your family's chewing and slurping driving you insane? Here's what to do 

 

Many of us know the experience of feeling enraged while sitting with a friend or a family member who's eating a little loudly and that sound makes you want to scream.

Now we're spending all of our time quarantined with the same family or friends, and every bite, chew, crunch and slurp is so LOUD.

For some of us, it's worse than for others, and the subtle, seemingly irrational reaction can actually be heightened among people we know well.

It's called "misophonia," said Zachary Rosenthal, a psychology professor at Duke University. That term means "hatred of sound." We can all be bothered by annoying or gross-seeming sounds, he said, but some people actually experience an abnormal fight-or-flight response.

CNN

Tags: Etiquette, Food, Mental Health, Pests, Science, Social Distancing, Terror, Training

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

22-Apr-2020


MONSTER HYBRID TUMBLEWEED SPECIES IS TAKING OVER CALIFORNIA, SCIENTISTS WARN 

 

A new invasive species of tumbleweed that can grow up to six feet in height is taking over parts of California—and scientists are warning it could spread even further as climate change makes its growing conditions more favorable.

Salsola ryanii was first identified in California in 2002. It is a hybrid made up of two other invasive species—Salsola tragus, which is native to Russia and China, and Salsola australis, from Australia and South Africa. The latter, scientists say, is "one of the world's worst weeds" and is currently found in 48 U.S. states. The new species, is however, far bigger and faster growing than its parents, reaching about six feet in height.

A tumbleweed is a plant that breaks away from its roots towards the end of summer. It is blown around by the wind—its means of seed dispersal. In doing this, tumbleweeds cause huge problems. They can lead to traffic accidents and damage property. Invasive species also cause problems for the agriculture industry and native ecosystems.

Newsweek

Tags: Environment, Pests, Plants, Science, Terraforming

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

27-Aug-2019


'Wonderful' Michigan Girl, 9, Is Mauled to Death by 3 Dogs, and Pet Owner Is Arrested 

 

A 9-year-old girl riding her bike near her family’s Detroit home died after an attack by three pit pulls Monday afternoon, after the girl’s father said he’d warned the dogs’ owner that his fence was too flimsy to hold back the animals.

“We had an argument about it just last week and he just didn’t take care of his dogs properly. He could have prevented this,” the father, Armando Hernandez, told Detroit radio station WWJ.

The girl, Emma Valentina Hernandez, was taken to Children’s Hospital of Michigan and died from her injuries in what the Wayne County medical examiner ruled was an accident, reports The Detroit News.

People

Vicious Pitbulls Escape Again, Kill Second Dachshund

Tags: Animals, Arrest, Attack, Children, Death, Mauling, Murder, Nature, Pests, Pitbull, Responsibility, Safety, Training, Violence, World

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

20-Aug-2019


Massachusetts Man Reportedly in a Coma After Contracting Brain Infection From a Mosquito 

 

A rare, sometimes fatal viral infection spread by mosquitoes has resurfaced in Massachusetts—and has likely sent at least one man into a coma. Over the weekend, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health reported that a local resident contracted the Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus. Dozens of communities remain at critical or high risk for the virus, and residents are being advised to stay indoors at night.

Gizmodo

Tags: Contagion, Environment, Health, Insects, Pests, Safety, Virus, Warning

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

13-Aug-2019


ARE YOUR PALM TREES HARBORING ROOF RATS? 

 

There’s something inherently relaxing and beautiful about watching palms sway in the warm breeze. Palm trees grow well in Louisiana’s warm, humid climate as well, making them a seemingly perfect addition to your landscape.

Of course, humans aren’t the only ones with an eye for palm trees – other creatures love them too, but not necessarily for their aesthetics.

Roof rats, also known as fruit rats, love palms as a place to live. It’s possible that your lovely palm trees are actually harboring roof rats, and might really be encouraging vermin to invade your home.

What Are Roof Rats?

Call them what you want, roof rats, fruit rats, black rats, it all boils down to the same thing. These are the same rats that spread bubonic plague and fleas. They’ve been with humans for eons, and throughout that time, they’ve been less than ideal houseguests. Rats spread far more diseases than the frightening Black Death, though. Others include murine typhus, salmonella, rat-bite fever and leptospirosis to name only a few.

Where Do They Live?

Roof rats actually prefer to live in trees, particularly in palm trees...

Fischer Environmental

Tags: Breeding, Disease, Environment, Health, Ignorance, Illness, Lifestyle, Misrepresentation, Nature, Pests, Safety, Terraforming, Threat, Toxic

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

02-Aug-2019


Deadly Virus Found In Florida, Causes Brain Swelling From Mosquito Bites 

 

The latest U.S. healthcare news warns the rapid spread of a deadly mosquito-borne virus known as Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) in Florida that causes brain-swelling.

According to reports, many sentinel chickens have tested positive for EEE.

The confirmed presence of the virus in Orange County’s sentinel chickens have raised “the risk of transmission to humans,” according to a statement by the county’s department of health.

Sentinels are fowls tested for the West Nile virus and EEE. Their blood samples may show the presence of the diseases but it is not necessary that they would suffer from the viruses.

The EEE virus spreading to humans via carriers like mosquitoes will lead to brain infection and swelling.

ibtimes

Tags: Brain, Disease, Environment, Health, Insects, Nature, Pests, Science, Terraforming, Threat, Warning

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

29-Jul-2019


Maine Confirmed Its First Case of a Rare Tick-Borne Virus in Years. Here's What to Know About Powassan 

 

Health officials have confirmed that an individual in Maine is sick with Powassan virus disease, marking the first time since 2017 that a person in the state has come down with the rare and serious tick-borne illness.

The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention announced Wednesday that a southern Maine resident was hospitalized for Powassan encephalitis—brain inflammation associated with the virus—after showing symptoms in late June. The announcement did not specify the individual’s current condition, but health officils doctors to stay vigilant about the potential spread of Powassan throughout the summer and early fall.

Here’s what to know about the tick-borne Powassan virus disease.

Time

Tags: Contagion, Disease, Environment, Health, Insects, Nature, Pests, Safety, Science, Terraforming, Warning

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

25-Jul-2019


WHAT IS EEE VIRUS? MOSQUITOES CARRYING DEADLY VIRUS FOUND IN NEW YORK AND MASSACHUSETTS 

 

Health officials have confirmed the potentially life-threatening Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) virus has been found in mosquitoes in both New York and Massachusetts.

New York's Oswego County Health Department said on Tuesday that two mosquitoes taken from a field station at Toad Harbor Swamp in West Monroe tested positive for the EEE virus, Sycaruse.com reported.

On Tuesday, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health revealed EEE-carrying mosquitoes were identified for the first time this summer in mid-July, The Boston Globe reported. The bugs were found in the towns of Easton, Freetown, and Fairhaven, as well as the city of New Bedford.

Oswego County Public Health Director Jiancheng Huang told CNY Central: "We are working closely with state Department of Health to monitor mosquito activity around the county and will take actions as deemed appropriate based on consultations with state and regional partners."

Newsweek

Salmonella outbreak tied to pig-ear dog treats expands to 27 states

Cases of Flesh-Eating Bacteria Are on the Rise as Summer Heats Up: Here's How to Stay Safe

Tags: Animals, Contagion, Contamination, Disease, Environment, Food, Health, Illness, Insects, Nature, Pests, Terraforming, Warning, Water

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

24-Jul-2019


SCIENTISTS SAY SKRILLEX STOPS MOSQUITOES FROM BITING 

 

It sounds like an April Fools’ prank, but scientists say that music by dubstep star Skrillex can keep mosquitoes from biting.

If it’s a joke, it goes deep: the research is at the center of a paper published in the journal Acta Tropica last week, and the story has been picked up by the BBC News, HuffPo, and The Telegraph.

Assuming it isn’t an elaborate joke — and, given the timing, it’s hard not to be a little suspicious — the finding could suggest futuristic sound-based ways to keep disease-transmitting insects at bay.

Futurism

Tags: Disease, Environment, Insects, Music, Nature, Pests, Science, Study, Treatment

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

02-Apr-2019


Rising temperatures will help mosquitos infect a billion more people 

 

Mosquitoes are unrelenting killers. In fact, they are among the most lethal animals in the world. When they carry dangerous viruses or other organisms, a bite can be unforgiving. They cause millions of deaths every year from such infectious diseases as malaria, dengue, Zika, chikungunya, yellow fever, and at least a dozen more.

But here's the really bad news: climate change is expected to make them even deadlier. As the planet heats up, these insects will survive winter and proliferate, causing an estimated billion or more new infections by the end of the century, according to new research.

Popular Science

Tags: Disease, Environment, Insects, Killer, Nature, Pests, Study, Weather

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

29-Mar-2019


Pests to eat more crops in warmer world 

 

Insects will be at the heart of worldwide crop losses as the climate warms up, predicts a US study.

Scientists estimate the pests will be eating 10-25% more wheat, rice and maize across the globe for each one degree rise in climate temperature.

Warming drives insect energy use and prompts them to eat more. Their populations can also increase.

This is bound to put pressure on the world's leading cereal crops, says study co-author Curtis Deutsch.

BBC

Tags: Ecology, Environment, Food, Health, Insects, Nature, Pests, Population, Science, Survival, Weather, World

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

01-Sep-2018


Chagas Disease, Which Is Spread By The “Kissing Bug,” Is Spreading In The U.S., According To These Doctors 

 

If the threat of bed bugs weren't enough to make you want to sleep in a full bodysuit complete with a hoodie and face mask, Chagas disease, which is spread by the "kissing bug," has been found in 28 states in the United States, a new report from the American Heart Association says, with a potential 300,000 Americans infected. And, similar to bed bugs, triatomine bugs bite at night. Unlike bed bugs, which are more of a physical nuisance and mental nightmare, kissing bugs do transmit disease. According to a research team based at Texas A&M University, 50 percent of triatomine bugs are infected with Chagas disease, a potentially life-threatening illness that's easily spread to humans.

These insects, which can grow to the size of a penny, are referred to as kissing bugs because they tend to bite unsuspecting sleepers on the face, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted on its website. "After they bite and ingest blood, they defecate on the person. The person can become infected if T. cruzi parasites in the bug feces enter the body through mucous membranes or breaks in the skin," the CDC explained.

Bustle

Tags: Disease, Environment, Health, Insects, Nature, Pests, Population, Safety, Warning

Filed under: Health/Food

Permalink

24-Aug-2018




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