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Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Psychology'

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Why woke diets featuring superfoods such as avocado and advocated by the likes of Ella Woodward are leading to a surge of distressing gut problems 

 

The woman, in her mid-30s, looked pretty healthy, which, undoubtedly, was her goal. Sitting in my clinic – I’m a dietician at a busy London hospital – we began discussing her daily food and drink regime.

Work was busy and stressful, so there wasn’t much time for breakfast, apart from some fruit or a green juice. Lunch was a salad brimming with chickpeas and roasted vegetables and topped with a sprinkling of antioxidant-rich seeds.

Yet more vegetables and maybe some ‘plant protein’ – beans and nuts – for dinner. She tries to limit her dairy intake, choosing lattes made with almond or soya milk.

And yet, here she was, almost doubled over with gut pain, complaining of bloating, cramps and other more embarrassing, and distressing, digestive complaints.

‘I never touch junk food,’ she added, hopefully.

At this point, I know I’m going to have to break some bad news. She may think her diet is exemplary but, in fact, it’s the cause of her problems.

I call it ‘woke’ or overzealous healthy eating – consuming vast quantities of so-called ‘clean’ ingredients while avoiding entire food groups such as dairy, carbohydrates or meat for health or ‘ethical’ reasons.

And I believe this kind of trendy eating is behind a surge in cases of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) that I, and my colleagues, have been seeing.

Daily Mail

Tags: Addiction, Development, Diet, Environment, Health, Injury, Mental Health, Nature, Neglect, Perception, Psychology, Recovery, Safety, Science, Support

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25-Jan-2020


Black youth have some of the highest suicide rates in America, and we’re only beginning to understand why 

 

Teen suicide rates among black youth are increasing. In 2016 and again in 2018, national data revealed that among children age 5-11, black children had the highest rate of death by suicide. For the years 2008 to 2012, 59 black youth died by suicide, up from 54 in the years 2003 to 2007.

Also, the 2015 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s biennial Youth Risk Behavior Survey reported that compared to non-Hispanic white boys, black high school age boys are more likely to have made serious suicide attempts that require medical attention.

I am a professor of psychology and also director of the culture, risk, and resilience research laboratory at the University of Houston. I recently co-authored a study that suggests that new risk profiles may be needed for better suicide prediction in African Americans in particular.

Popular Science

Tags: Awareness, Environment, Mental Health, Parental Burden, Protections, Psychology, Race, Safety, Statistics, Support, Treatment, Youth

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24-Jan-2020


Why Does It Feel Like No One Wants To Commit? The Answer Is Simpler Than You Think 

 

Dating is more complicated than ever right now: You can be Gatsbyed, breadcrumbed, and ghosted by your Tinder match... all in the same week. And even when a great first date gives you butterflies, knowing what to do next can be confusing AF. Luckily, in Elite Daily's series, We Need To Talk, our Dating editors break down the latest terms, trends, and issues affecting your life with their own hot takes to figure out how to navigate finding love in a world that changes faster than you can swipe left.

PSA: “Commitment” is not a dirty word. Whether the person you’re talking to is “sooooo busy with work” or “honestly not looking for anything serious right now,” it can feel like there’s an endless list of reasons no one wants to define the relationship, and an endless number of people who will lead you on, only to break your heart. Asking someone whether or not they want to commit to you can be more nerve-wracking than interviewing for your dream job and waiting on pregnancy test results combined, and it can make finding an exclusive relationship feel next to impossible. The good news? It’s not just you, and contrary to popular belief, casual hookup culture isn’t the only thing to blame.

Elite Daily

Tags: Dating, Dedication, Environment, Lifestyle, Modernization, Nature, Psychology, Relationships, Treatment

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23-Jan-2020


Middle-aged men are binge-drinking at dangerously high levels 

drunk old man helping a young man tie his tie
 

A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Thursday reveals that binge-drinking is becoming both more excessive and frequent — especially among middle-aged American men.

Published in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, the study relied on data from what’s known as the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a random digitized telephone survey of adults across the U.S. that’s conducted monthly. For this particular analysis, the researchers used BRFSS data from 2011 to 2017, measuring the average number of drinks consumed per sitting, the frequency of binge-drinking episodes, and the total overall number of binge drinks per year.

Yahoo

Tags: Aging, Alcohol, Disease, Environment, Happiness, Health, Life Expectancy, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Parental Burden, Psychology, Survival

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18-Jan-2020


Bullying is driving more than one in eight young people to have suicidal behaviours, research shows 

 

Bullying is a key driver of suicidal behaviour among young people across the world, according to new research warning the problem is worse than previously feared.

An international study by scientists in Britain, China and the US looked at data from 220,000 adolescents aged between 12 and 15 from 83 countries.

The study found more than one in eight youngsters across the world had suicidal behaviours, with bullying strongly associated to suicide attempts.

Bullied boys were more likely to attempt suicide than bullied girls.

Independent

Tags: Awareness, Children, Environment, Mental Health, Parental Burden, Parental Crime, Population, Psychology, Safety, Study, Suicide, World, Youth

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11-Jan-2020


Straight couples who live together before marriage may be less sexually satisfied 

 

More couples are choosing to test the waters before saying "I do" than ever before, foregoing some of the marriage traditions of the past, like waiting until after the wedding to move in together.

While some relationship experts applaud the trend as a healthy step before marriage it actually may not be great for your sex life.

A recent study published in The Journal of Sex Research found that straight couples who lived together before getting married reported having less sex in the first year of marriage and lower rates of sexual satisfaction overall than those who did not.

Business Insider

Tags: Psychology, Relationships, Sex, Study

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05-Jan-2020


Number of children admitted to A&E with mental health problems jumps 330 per cent over past decade 

 

Reduced community services and rising mental health issues among Britain’s youth have fuelled a 330 per cent surge in crisis admissions at hospital emergency departments.

A crackdown on the use of police cells for youngsters needing a specialist mental health hospital bed has also meant hospital A&E departments are increasingly the default option, The Independent has been told.

Since 2010 the number of children and young people admitted to an A&E and diagnosed with psychiatric conditions has increased 330 per cent.

The rise in A&E admissions comes as new data shows NHS mental health trusts are restricting services for children unless they are severely unwell.


Analysis of referral criteria used by 29 NHS mental health trusts, by Pulse magazine, found a third only accept patients with “severe/significant” conditions.

Just six out of the 29 trusts accept referrals for children with all severities of mental health problems.

In some cases GPs say children have attempted suicide in order for their referral to be accepted.

Independent

Tags: All Rights, Children, Discrimination, Environment, Mental Health, Parental Burden, Psychology, Support, Treatment, Warning, Youth

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05-Jan-2020


Five of your Facebook friends are psychopaths – but which ones? 

 

It’s official: five of your Facebook friends are probably psychopaths.

Thanks to research from the Mind Research Network, it’s estimated that about 1% of the population qualify as psychopaths - which, we hasten to point out, doesn’t mean that they’re ruthless cold-blooded killers.

“People often referred to as ‘psychopaths’ are those with Anti-social Personality Disorder,” social psychologist Dr Dina McMillan explains to Cosmo Australia.

“Traits include an inflated view of themselves, excessive selfishness, a complete lack of empathy and an unrelenting anger towards anyone who thwarts their efforts, insults them or humiliates them.”

Stylist

Tags: Environment, Mental Health, Psychology, Social Media, Study

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28-Dec-2019


After fatal school shooting, spikes are used among student survivors 

 

In the two years following fatal school shooting, the rate at which antidepressants were prescribed for children and adolescents increased by 21% within the tight ring around the affected school.

The increase in antidepressants prescribed to the children grew more – to nearly 25% – three years after school shooting, suggesting that the depression of survivors goes back long after the incident begins to depart from public memory.

News Today

Tags: Education, Effect, Medicine, Mental Health, Parental Burden, Psychology, Study, Violence

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16-Dec-2019


Young Adult Food Insecurity Linked to Poor Mental Health 

 

A team of researchers led by Jason Nagata of the University of California, San Francisco, recently published an article in the Journal of Adolescent Health detailing the scope of influence of food insecurity on a variety of outcomes related to young adult wellbeing. The researchers reported that somewhere between 9% and 14% of young adults in the 24-34-year age-range experience food insecurity, and that food insecurity among college students may be more than double that percentage.

In their sample of approximately 14,786 young adults in the United States, 11% of whom reported food insecurity, food-insecure participants were significantly more likely to endorse experiences of depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, and poor sleep quality (difficulties falling and staying asleep) than their food-secure peers.

Mad In America

Tags: Awareness, Environment, Food, Health, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Nature, Parental Burden, Protections, Psychology, Safety, Study, Suicide, Support, Youth

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11-Dec-2019


The Rare Truth About Sexual Compulsivity 

 

Today we have a tiny number of true sexual compulsives who do things like getting repeatedly arrested for public masturbation. We also have a large number who fear or believe or have been told they’re sex addicts. But oddly, when surveyed about what purported addicts actually do sexually, they don’t have any more sex or any wilder, less controlled sex than boatloads of people who feel certain they’re psychologically fine.

Many women cannot fathom why so many men feel such a deep need to polish pipe. Many also believe that only evil men watch porn. Actually, almost every man has and does. Canadian researchers wanted to compare sexual attitudes among men who had and had never watched porn. They couldn’t find a single adult man who hadn’t—not one.

Porn is not evil. It’s a cartoon version of men’s fantasies of effortless sexual abundance. Virtually every Internet-connected man on Earth has seen porn, many frequently, some daily or more.

Psychology Today

Tags: Health, Masturbation, Mental Health, Nature, Privacy, Psychology, Religion, Respect, Science, Sex

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03-Dec-2019


'It concerns me greatly': Have #MeToo and modern feminism gone too far? 

 

Joanna Williams was raised a feminist. But these days, she hesitates to identify as one.

The author and academic thinks today's feminism "lost the plot somewhere along the line," describing it as a "white middle class feminism."

"[It] seems intent upon telling women that they are victims, that they are vulnerable, that they need special protections," she says. "For me, feminism was always about fighting for liberation."

CBC

Tags: All Rights, Environment, Feminism, Hate, Politics, Psychology, Woman's Rights, Women, Writing

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26-Nov-2019


Identity 

 

Much of the research examining identity has focused on traits or dynamics that are considered universal for all human beings (e.g., self-esteem, introversion-extraversion, and levels of anxiety) regardless of race, culture, gender, sexual orientation, or class. At this level, researchers and clinicians treat human experiences as being similar, for example, the experiences of aging, coping with life stress, and interpersonal relationships. However, the extent to which any one of these traits and dynamics may be high or low, prominent, amplified, or muted differs as a result of sociodemographic categories such as culture, class, gender, ethnicity, or sexual orientation.

Psychology

Identity, Self-Esteem and Self-Compassion

Tags: Brain, Discovery, Identity, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Psychology, Science, Social Media, Society, World

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05-Oct-2019


Will There Ever Be a Cure for Addiction? 

 

From drinking hand-sanitizing gels to using synthetic marijuana, our society is constantly inventing new ways to get high. When one substance is banned, another quickly takes its place. What drives this never-ending hunt for the next high?

One important motivator is the pleasure principle. The quest for pleasure is a fundamental part of being human. It helps us meet our basic needs by pushing us to work towards specific goals.

Drugs provide an instant shortcut to our brain’s pleasure center. They flood our brains with dopamine and condition us to seek the next high. As a result, our bodies begin reducing their natural dopamine output. With repeated drug use, pleasure dissipates but the cravings remain. Thus, drugs hijack our natural drive for pleasure. Addicts pursue drugs despite the fact that the pleasure they experience from them progressively diminishes.

Psychology Today

Tags: Addiction, Alcohol, Disease, Drugs, Environment, Health, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Psychology, Science, Treatment

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16-Sep-2019


How A Horror Movie About Trauma Made Me Realize How Toxic My Friendships Had Become 

 

For many victims of trauma, especially childhood trauma and abuse, one of the hardest parts of recovery can be forming and maintaining healthy relationships. In my case, childhood trauma led to a serious distrust of others, a need for and fear of intimacy, and the frustrating symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). I ended up seeking out other trauma survivors as friends, because we shared the language of pain. Years after those friendships died out, I saw myself in Pascal Laugier’s Martyrs (2008), a film about two deeply traumatized women whose unusual bond enables terrible violence. While I never helped my friends hide any bodies, the relationship between Lucie (Mylène Jampanoï) and Anna (Morjana Alaoui) reflected many of my troubled adolescent friendships. Sometimes we’re so desperate to fix what’s “broken” in ourselves and each other that we can’t see we’re only causing more damage.

A 2009 study published in the journal Depression & Anxiety showed that women are more likely than men to experience depression or anxiety as a result of childhood neglect or emotional abuse. In addition, researchers found that in women, but not men, "perceived friend social support protected against adult depression" — and this was even after they accounted for "the contributions of both emotional abuse and neglect."

In my own experience, I find that the danger may be that some women cling to these friendships even if they become unhealthy, because they have a significant sentimentality toward them. I certainly did.

Bustle

Tags: Awareness, Entertainment, Mental Health, Portrait, Psychology, Relationships, Survival

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27-Aug-2019




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