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Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Brain'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Identity 

 

Much of the research examining identity has focused on traits or dynamics that are considered universal for all human beings (e.g., self-esteem, introversion-extraversion, and levels of anxiety) regardless of race, culture, gender, sexual orientation, or class. At this level, researchers and clinicians treat human experiences as being similar, for example, the experiences of aging, coping with life stress, and interpersonal relationships. However, the extent to which any one of these traits and dynamics may be high or low, prominent, amplified, or muted differs as a result of sociodemographic categories such as culture, class, gender, ethnicity, or sexual orientation.

Psychology

Identity, Self-Esteem and Self-Compassion

Tags: Brain, Discovery, Identity, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Psychology, Science, Social Media, Society, World

Permalink

05-Oct-2019


Deadly Virus Found In Florida, Causes Brain Swelling From Mosquito Bites 

 

The latest U.S. healthcare news warns the rapid spread of a deadly mosquito-borne virus known as Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) in Florida that causes brain-swelling.

According to reports, many sentinel chickens have tested positive for EEE.

The confirmed presence of the virus in Orange County’s sentinel chickens have raised “the risk of transmission to humans,” according to a statement by the county’s department of health.

Sentinels are fowls tested for the West Nile virus and EEE. Their blood samples may show the presence of the diseases but it is not necessary that they would suffer from the viruses.

The EEE virus spreading to humans via carriers like mosquitoes will lead to brain infection and swelling.

ibtimes

Tags: Brain, Disease, Environment, Health, Insects, Nature, Pests, Science, Terraforming, Threat, Warning

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29-Jul-2019


Can I Use a Sick Day as a ‘Mental Health Day’? 

 

Rosenblatt is director of communications for Accessibility Partners, a small IT consulting firm. The company is so small that it doesn’t fall under the Americans with Disabilities Act, and it doesn’t have to follow the same federal rules with sick leave that large companies do.

However, her boss has been accommodating, allowing her time to attend therapy and psychiatric appointments, to deal with medication changes and even time in inpatient treatment.

That kind of treatment toward mental health might seem rare, but there’s evidence that it’s less taboo than it used to be.

The World Health Organization recently classified burnout as a diagnosable health condition.

According to an Australian study, one-third of workers have “faked an illness” to use a sick day for their mental health.

But 26 percent of employers have fired a worker for using a sick day for what they see as a “personal day.”

So deciding to take your sick day as a mental health day can be a tricky decision, especially if you’re worried your employer won’t see it as legitimate.

Mental health is a disability
Here’s the thing. Changes to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in 2008 expanded the definition of disability. This means that mental disorders like depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety and schizophrenia are protected.

So, if you’ve got a diagnosed mental disorder like about 44 million American adults, almost one in five people, you can’t be fired for asking for accommodations, such as the occasional mental health day.

Rewire

9 Surprising Changes That Occur In The Body When You Get Rejected

Hundreds weigh in on Chicago’s mental health crisis as city task force examines solutions

More Millennials Are Dying 'Deaths of Despair,' as Overdose and Suicide Rates Climb

Tags: All Rights, Brain, Business, Death, Drugs, Employment, Health, Mental Health, Overdose, Policy, Protections, Representation, Science, Sick Day, Study, Suicide, Support, Youth

Permalink

14-Jun-2019


Brain disease linked to lychee toxins kills 47 children in India 

 

Almost 50 children have died in northern India over the past three weeks from a brain disease that has been linked to toxins in lychees.

Health authorities in the state of Bihar said Thursday that 47 children have died of acute encephalitis syndrome, which involves inflammation of the brain. Two hospitals in the city of Muzaffarpur had registered a total of 179 cases since January, they said, but the deaths occurred only in the past few weeks.

In 2013, at least 351 people died of encephalitis in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh.

"This year, the number [of cases] has gone up a bit. The heat wave has been too intense, and it has gone on for too long," said Sanjay Kumar, a senior state health official.

CNN

14,000 cases of a flour brand have been recalled nationwide because of E. coli fears

Tags: Brain, Children, Disease, E. coli, Food, Health, Nature, Parental Burden, Product, Protections, Recall, Safety, Toxic, Warning, World

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14-Jun-2019


Music Industry Tests Mini-Grants to Help Artists Recover: 'I Want to See Rappers Name-Checking Their Therapists' 

 

Is the music industry’s increased ­spending on mental health making a difference?

The high-profile deaths of artists like Chris Cornell, Lil Peep and Chester Bennington in 2017 led to a spike in funding by music companies on mental health research and groups that provide resources to uninsured artists. But while spending has increased by 25%, the number of artists reporting mental illness issues and self-medication for depression has grown slightly, frustrating mental health advocates.

"I’m tired of watching people die from this disease," said Macklemore on May 16 during MusiCares’ 15th annual Concert for Recovery in Los Angeles, where he accepted an award and paid tribute to rapper Mac Miller, who died of a drug overdose on Sept. 7 at the age of 27.

As the music industry assesses how it allocates resources, many are shifting toward a more targeted approach, forgoing large grants and endowments to organizations in favor of smaller, direct payments to individuals in need of counseling, hospitalization or rehab.

Billboard

This One Habit Makes You More Likely to Develop Mental Health Issues

Tags: Awareness, Brain, Entertainment, Environment, Grant, Mental Health, Music, Safety, Science, Stepping Up, Suicide, Support, Treatment

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29-May-2019


A LAB GREW A “MINI BRAIN” FROM THIS GUY’S CELLS. THEN THINGS GOT WEIRD. 

 

When science writer Philip Ball donated some flesh from his arm to a neuroscience lab growing “mini brains,” he originally intended to contribute to research into the biological mechanisms of dementia.

Instead, he ended up with a simplified genetic replica of his own brain growing in a petri dish — and found himself questioning what makes us human, according to a new review of Ball’s upcoming book published in Nature.

Futurism

Tags: Brain, Discovery, Science, Study, Writing

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13-May-2019


Low-dose aspirin linked to bleeding in the skull, new report says 

 

Taking low-dose aspirin to prevent heart disease and stroke is associated with an increased risk of bleeding in the skull in people without a history of those conditions, according to a new report.

Researchers analyzed data from 13 previous studies in which over 130,000 people ages 42 to 74, who didn't have a history of heart disease or stroke, were given either low-dose aspirin or a placebo for the prevention of these conditions.
An aspirin is typically defined as low-dose if it is between 75 and 100 milligrams, but most over-the-counter pills are around 81 milligrams.

CNN

Tags: Awareness, Brain, Drugs, Health, Injury, Medical, Safety, Science

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13-May-2019


In China, Surgeons Are Treating Addiction With Brain Implants 

 

Deep brain stimulation (DBS), an experimental technology that involves implanting a pacemaker-like device in a patient’s brain to send electrical impulses, is a hotly debated subject in the field of medicine. It’s an inherently risky procedure and the exact effects on the human brain aren’t yet fully understood.

But some practitioners believe it could be a way to alleviate the symptoms of depression or even help treat Alzheimer’s — and now they suspect it could help with drug addiction as well.

In a world’s first, according to the Associated Press, a patient in Shanghai’s Ruijin Hospital had a DBS device implanted in his brain to treat his addiction to methamphetamine.

And the device has had an astonishingly positive effect, the patient says.

Futurism

Tags: Addiction, Brain, Environment, Health, Mental Health, Science, Tech, Treatment

Permalink

09-May-2019


The Anatomy of Empathy 

 

One morning in the winter of 2007, a medical student sprinted toward a code blue at the University of Miami Hospital. A man had collapsed in the waiting room.

Before the alarm sounded, the two men were strangers. Seconds after, 24-year-old Joel Salinas and the man having a heart attack became linked—not just by Salinas’s medical responsibility to try to save him, but by an incredible fluke of the brain that allowed Salinas to intimately experience what the man was feeling. Salinas has a condition called mirror touch synesthesia, which means, simply, that when he sees another person feel something, he feels it too.

“I felt my back pressed firmly against the linoleum floor, my limp body buckling under each compression, my chest swelling with each artificial breath squeezed into me through a tube, a hollow slipping sensation,” he wrote in his memoir Mirror Touch, published in 2017. “I was dying, but I was not.”

Vice

Tags: Brain, Empathy, Employment, Health, Medical, Science

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09-May-2019


Specific People Are Weirdly Good at Predicting the Future 

 

Fortune Tellers

If a world-renowned expert makes a prediction about the future, there’s a good chance that they’ll be wrong.

Historically, scientific evidence suggests that the people best suited to predict future world events are generalists who dabble in all sorts of fields, according to a fascinating new book excerpt in The Atlantic, because they’re less beholden to their own biases. On the other hand, people who have built up an impressive but narrowly-focused expertise tend to make less-accurate predictions because they tend to be limited by their own worldviews.

Dabbling

One might expect that people who have dedicated their lives to one field of study may be able to predict where that field is going. But data suggesting the very opposite began to emerge after a 20-year experiment beginning in 1984. In that experiment, seasoned experts and academics were pitted up against generalists— people who read voraciously and had a variety of interests — in a contest of predicting near and distant financial, political, and other events.

Futurism

Tags: Awareness, Brain, Environment, Future, Prediction, Psychology, Science

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07-May-2019


THE HIDDEN STIGMA IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY 

 

Whether it was Slavery, Jim Crow, The Crack Epidemic, or Mass Incarceration, the suffering that Black people endured seems to have been never-ending. With that being said, the trauma that many of us have faced since the beginning of modern western civilization takes its toll on one’s mental health.

The stigma of dealing with the continuous cycle of the demonization of addressing one’s mental health in the Black community is one that prevents those seeking help to enhance their lives and, in some cases, to save them. Toxic masculinity is another contribution to this stigma as Black children, especially little boys, are told that expressing any sort of emotion is a sign of weakness. This conditioning can harbor psychological health issues for years to come.

According to the US HHS Office of Minority Health, adult African-Americans are 20% more likely to state that they are suffering from psychological distress than their adult white counterparts. This is due to less than 2% of the American Psychological Association being African-American, which leads many African-Americans to distrust mental health care practitioners to help them with their issues.

discovergrey

Tags: Brain, Choices, Disease, Education, Environment, Family, Health, Lifestyle, Perception, Relationships, Respect, Safety, Support, Treatment

Permalink

01-Apr-2019


Are We Ready For An Implant That Can Change Our Moods? 

 

Our thoughts and fears, movements and sensations all arise from the electrical blips of billions of neurons in our brain. Streams of electricity flow through neural circuits to govern these actions of the brain and body, and some scientists think that many neurological and psychiatric disorders may result from dysfunctional circuits.

As this understanding has grown, some scientists have asked whether we could locate these faulty circuits, reach deep into the brain and nudge the flow to a more functional state, treating the underlying neurobiological cause of ailments like tremors or depression.

The idea of changing the brain for the better with electricity is not new, but deep brain stimulation takes a more targeted approach than the electroconvulsive therapy introduced in the 1930s. DBS seeks to correct a specific dysfunction in the brain by introducing precisely timed electric pulses to specific regions. It works by the action of a very precise electrode that is surgically inserted deep in the brain and typically controlled by a device implanted under the collarbone. Once in place, doctors can externally tailor the pulses to a frequency that they hope will fix the faulty circuit.

npr

Tags: Brain, Mental Health, Science, Tech, Therapy, Treatment

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30-Mar-2019


Dogs Will Actually Lie to Get What They Want 

 

Just look into a dog’s furry, innocent face. What could be more transparent and honest? Don’t trust it, say a group of Swiss scientiststhis link opens in a new tab. According to their work, which was published in 2017this link opens in a new tab, dogs are capable of displaying deceptive behavior toward humans. At least when there are sausages at stake (seriously, they used sausages in this study).

BHG

Baby Dog Buyers Beware: 9 Tips to Avoid Fake Breeders, Faux Rescues and Internet-Based Puppy Mills

Tags: Animals, Brain, Environmentalist, Intelligence, Pets, Purchase, Science, Study

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26-Mar-2019


The innovations of Medical Technology in relieving Depression 

 

One can feel depression and express it in a different manner. Science is researching on it and trying to help people to get relief from this mental condition. There is already much advancement with current medical and psychological therapies. The resistant cases i.e. patients who do not get benefit from current possible therapies may require the use of electric shock in a therapy called Electroconvulsive therapy.

There is one step forward in the treatment of depression and Medical technology has introduced several devices to help people with depression.

Tech Engage

Teen screen time linked to feelings of loneliness: The importance of spending time with friends

Tags: App, Brain, Mental Health, Science, Social Media, Tech, Treatment, Video, Youth

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23-Mar-2019


Anesthesia can help patients forget a disturbing memory 

 

Giving patients an anesthetic can help them forget a disturbing memory, according to research published today in the journal Science Advances. It’s the latest study to investigate the conditions that might prevent memories from sticking, and it could be a step toward finding a technique that helps people deal with harmful memories related to anxiety, trauma, or addiction.

The Verge

Tags: Brain, Drugs, Memory, Science, Study, Treatment

Permalink

21-Mar-2019




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