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Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Awareness'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

How Tracy Sherrod Came to Lead America’s Oldest Black Publishing Imprint 

 

Lauren Michele Jackson recently wrote a piece for Vulture, looking at lists of Black texts that pop up whenever there’s a galvanizing incident of racial violence. A lot of the magazines and websites will publish a list like, here’s what to read to think about race. Jackson wrote. “Aside from the contemporary teaching texts, genre appears indiscriminately: essays slide against memoir and folklore, poetry squeezed on either side by sociological tomes. This, maybe ironically but maybe not, reinforces an already pernicious literary divide that books written by or about minorities are for educational purposes, racism and homophobia and stuff, wholly segregated from matters of form and grammar, lyric and scene.” I’d really like to hear your perspective on this, because you publish books about race, but you publish books about everything. Do you think readers should be looking at books as curative or as medicine for toxicity and racism in this culture?

Slate

Tags: Awareness, Books, Celebration, Choices, Education, Entertainment, History, Politics, Racism, Representation, Respect, Writing

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06-Jul-2020


Planting Trees Won’t Stop Climate Change 

 

Not only are planted trees not the carbon sinks you want, but tree planting frequently ends up doing more harm than good.

Humans have long believed that planting trees, any kind of tree, anywhere, is good, something Mother Nature cries out for, something that might even solve our climate crisis. Tree-planting initiatives proliferate: the Bonn Challenge, Trees for the Future, Trees Forever, the 10 Billion Tree Tsunami, Plant a Billion Trees, 8 Billion Trees, the Trillion Tree Campaign, the One Trillion Trees Initiative, to mention just a few.

But such slapdash planting is an American tradition. In 1876, possibly inspired by Arbor Day, a man named Ellwood Cooper sought to improve his 2,000-acre, mostly treeless ranch near Santa Barbara, California, with 50,000 eucalyptus seedlings. They shot up 40 feet in just three years, an unheard-of growth rate for which they became known as “miracle trees.” Eucalyptus trees are not native to California.

Shortly thereafter, the University of California and the state Department of Forestry distributed free eucs for everyone to plant. Prairies, chaparral, and cutover forestland were jammed full of these aliens. One hundred years after the first Arbor Day, 271,800 acres of eucalyptus had been planted in the U.S., 197,700 of them in California.

When I inserted my arm into euc leaf and bark litter in Bolinas, California, I couldn’t touch the bottom. That’s because the microbes and insects that eat it are in Australia, not California. Native plant communities can’t survive in these plantations because eucs kill competition with their own herbicide, creating what botanists call “eucalyptus desolation.” Eucs evolved with fire and prosper from it. Their tops don’t just burn; they explode. Living near them is like living beside a gasoline refinery staffed by chain smokers.

But eucs remain popular in California. They’re still being planted. And agencies seeking to protect the public and recover native ecosystems by razing eucs inevitably face the fury of eucalyptus lovers who have, for example, accused them of being “plant Nazis.”

Slate

Tags: Awareness, Contamination, Environment, Etiquette, Nature, Science, Terraforming, Trees

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25-May-2020


Glennon Doyle thinks our kids suck. And it’s all our fault. 

 

New York Times bestselling author Glennon Doyle is unequivocal in her opinion on modern parenting.

In her new book Untamed, she describes how parents receive a ‘terrible memo’ from society as soon as our kids are born.

This memo says that our kids are our saviours and parenting them is akin to a religion. We must give them every opportunity possible and most importantly, we must never allow anything difficult to happen to them.

According to Glennon, not only does this disastrous memo make us parents feel exhausted, neurotic and guilty; but it is also the reason why our kids suck.

Ouch.

The reason our kids suck, she says, is because we no longer allow our children to learn how to lose, or to struggle, or to be rejected.

MamaMia

Tags: Advice, Awareness, Books, Family, Parental Crime, Parental Laziness, Psychology, Responsibility, Social Media, Training, Treatment, Unruly Child

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20-May-2020


New syndrome in kids could change fate of schools reopening in fall, Cuomo says 

 

The growing number of New York children diagnosed with a serious inflammatory syndrome possibly connected to COVID-19 may impact whether schools reopen in the fall, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Sunday.

Health officials are investigating more than 120 cases of pediatric multi-system inflammatory syndrome in New York, according to the governor.

“This is a syndrome that we are only just discovering,” Cuomo said. “I think the numbers are going to be much, much higher.”

The illness, which causes the inflammation of blood vessels, has been identified in children across 16 states and at least five countries, according to Cuomo. At least three children have died in New York, health officials have said.

Symptoms of PMIS include a persistent fever, rash, abdominal pain and vomiting. Parents should call their pediatrician immediately if their children exhibit symptoms.

Pix11

Doctors raise hopes of blood test for children with coronavirus-linked syndrome

Tags: Awareness, Children, Contagion, Coronavirus, Death, Discovery, Education, Environment, Fear, Health, Illness, Medical, Parental Burden, Responsibility, Statistics, Study, Threat, World

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17-May-2020


INTERVENTIONS BOOST SEXUAL HEALTH FOR BLACK TEENS 

 

The new paper in JAMA Pediatrics draws on data from 29 studies that reported 11,918 black teens. Sexual health interventions included, among other things, school-based health classes and community organization programs.

“We focused on black adolescents because they face greater health disparities when it comes to the risk of unplanned pregnancy and contracting sexually-transmitted infections (STIs) compared to other adolescents,” says first author Reina Evans, a PhD student at North Carolina State University.

“This disparity stems, in large part, from the context in which black teens make decisions about their health. For example, stress from racism and discrimination, as well as unequal access to health care can impact the health of black teens. We wanted to see whether sexual health interventions can be a valuable tool in addressing this disparity.”

The findings show that young people were slightly more likely to abstain from sex if they took part in one of these programs—particularly if the intervention occurred at school. The researchers also found a modest increase in condom use for adolescents who took part in an intervention.

Futurity

Tags: Addiction, Awareness, Celibacy, Education, Environment, Etiquette, Health, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Parental Crime, Pregnancy, Race, Responsibility, Safety, Sex, Survival, Training, Treatment

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23-Apr-2020


Inside the Sex-Positive, Socially Distanced Rebirth of Sex Ed 

 

Melissa Pintor Carnagey’s puberty workshops still feature the same genital anatomy models and quizzes around body care, but these days she looks out on a virtual classroom of adolescents sitting at home alongside a parent. A few weeks ago, she took her in-person classes to Zoom, where familiar exercises have gotten a technological update: a software program allows students to text her their associations with puberty. A colorful on-screen collage of words like “pimples,” “breasts,” “hair,” “acne,” and “sex” show up on the screen, each growing in size relative to the number of students who submit it.

Since Carnagey’s puberty workshops went online, they continually sell out within 48 hours of open registration. “We’ve definitely seen an influx in families seeking out resources for sex ed,” said Carnagey, founder of the organization Sex Positive Families. “Parents are very hungry for access to these conversations, the information, and the resources.”

Jezebel

Tags: Awareness, Children, Development, Education, Etiquette, Family, Instructional, Mental Health, Parental Burden, Puberty, Responsibility, Sex, Support, Training, Youth

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14-Apr-2020


White House: Americans should avoid grocery shopping as coronavirus hits apex 

 

The White House coronavirus task force is now warning against even going out to buy groceries or medication as the pandemic is expected to hit a deadly apex in the coming two weeks.

“The next two weeks are extraordinarily important,” White House coronavirus response coordinator Deborah Birx warned at a press conference late Saturday.

“This is the moment to not be going to the grocery store, not going to the pharmacy, but doing everything you can to keep your family and your friends safe,” Birx warned.

NY Post

Tags: Awareness, Coronavirus, Environment, Etiquette, Health, Lifestyle, Outbreak, Quarantine, Shopping, Support, Unity

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05-Apr-2020


SF outlaws reusable bags, which the city once championed 

 

San Francisco, which once championed reusable shopping bags to reduce plastic waste, has banned the environmentally friendly totes in an effort to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.

An amendment to the city’s Department of Health’s social-distancing protocols requires that stores restrict customers from bringing their own bags, mugs or other reusable items from home.

How the ban affects city's prohibition on plastic bags is not clear — the ordinance did not address that regulation. In 2007, San Francisco became the first major city in the nation to outlaw single-use plastic bags.

SF Gate

Tags: Awareness, Bag, Contamination, Coronavirus, Environment, Etiquette, Plastic, Safety, Saving The Environment!, Shopping, Survival, Warning

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05-Apr-2020


I'm a Doctor Recovering From COVID-19. I Can't Get Over the Government's Callousness for Human Life 

 

It’s hard to sit in a room alone and not really know which way you’re going to go.

And you don’t have any of your social support. My family actually quarantined upstate, because they live there mostly full-time this year. I was able to FaceTime, which is something probably a lot of elderly people can’t do. My kids, who are 2 and 4, don’t know. They think I was at work. I wore a mask, so they couldn’t really see the whole high-flow setup.

For my wife, her mother died of lung cancer when she was 13, so, this was acutely traumatic for her. She’s isolating upstate and she’s taking care of two kids while she’s really pregnant. I still don’t know how she’s dealing with it. Probably not well.

I managed my own high flow. After six days in the hospital, I was able to get down off the high flow for a long time. The hospital was full, and I was like — you know, I’m just feeling OK enough to manage at home. The hospital is such a sick, ill environment right now, I didn’t want to spend any more time there than I absolutely needed to. I definitely think I have a long way to recover, and certainly my lungs have taken a bit of a hit. It’s going to be a bit of time before I feel like I’m not at risk for regular infections, like pneumonia.

The virus is impacting a subset of people who are infected, but the aftershocks of this are going to be felt in a lot of different areas. The sort of emotional, psychological toll on health care workers will probably lead to people leaving medicine. This idea that — I can’t really adequately say it — that people are dispensable. The government thinks that we can go to work without proper PPE and put our lives at risk. That’s something you can’t really get over — this kind of callousness for human life. I think they should have been trying harder months ago. And there are going to be people who miss their mammograms and get breast cancer. Or they have chest pain and they don’t want to go to the hospital, because they don’t want to get COVID.

Time

Tags: Awareness, Coronavirus, Employment, Environment, Health, Portrait, Quarantine, Recovery, Safety, Support, Survival

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30-Mar-2020


New York may be weeks away from reaching a peak in coronavirus cases. Now other states are preparing for a surge 

 

Several states are reporting a spike in coronavirus cases, raising fears more hotspots will emerge in the US after New York as soon as next week.

The US surpassed Italy and China this week to become the country with the most coronavirus cases in the world --- with more than 101,240 known cases, according to CNN's tally. At least 1,588 Americans have died. At least 402 of those deaths were reported on Friday alone.

More than a third of the country's cases are in New York -- which has been in a partial lockdown for a week as officials try to slow the spread of the virus and hospitals scramble to keep up with the patients streaming in.

Tracking coronavirus cases in the US

The state's healthcare system is already overwhelmed. One hospital was forced to create a makeshift morgue and another reported 13 patient deaths in 24 hours. New York and its National Guard are now assembling four 1,000-bed temporary, overflow hospitals in existing buildings.

The rate of new cases may be slowing in New York, but the governor says it may take 21 days for the state to hit its peak -- the highest point of reported cases before that number begins going down.

Gavin Newsom takes new tone with Trump as he steers California during coronavirus crisis

Meanwhile, officials in other states are warning they could be next. In Los Angeles County, cases more than tripled in six days and one official says numbers will keep going up. Health Director Barbara Ferrer says she expects to see case counts in Los Angeles double every four days for the next two to three weeks.

CNN

Tags: Americans, Awareness, Choices, Community, Contagion, Coronavirus, Environment, Etiquette, Health, Lifestyle, Population, Responsibility, Safety, Statistics, Support, Threat, Unity, World

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28-Mar-2020


Do you wear contact lenses? You should switch to glasses to stop spreading the virus 

 

Focus on this, contact lens wearers of the world: To reduce the spread of the pandemic virus that causes Covid-19, experts suggest it's time to put your contact lenses on the shelf and dazzle the world with your frames.

That's because wearing glasses can help you stop touching your face, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, a key way any virus is spread, including the novel coronavirus currently spreading across the world.

Why contact lens?

Contact lens users not only touch their eyes to put in and remove their lens twice or more a day, they also touch their eyes and face much more than people who don't wear contacts, said Dr. Thomas Steinemann, a clinical spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

"You touch your eye and then you touch another part of your body," said Steinemann, an ophthalmologist at MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio.

CNN

Tags: Awareness, Contact Lens, Contamination, Coronavirus, Etiquette, Glasses, Health, Perception, Responsibility, Safety, Science, Vulnerable, Warning

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27-Mar-2020


Coronavirus and work: Fla. employee says she was fired after asking to work from home 

 

A Tallahassee, Florida, worker says she was fired from her job after she asked to work from home amid coronavirus concerns.

Katherine Webster, 25, has an autoimmune illness called interstitial cystitis, and her 9-year-old son has diabetes and asthma.

As health authorities advise social distancing and local schools close through March, the local mom was afraid of potentially getting the virus from the office and bringing it home to her already-ill son.

She's a project engineer for Tower Construction Management, which is contracted by Robert Finvarb Companies to build the interior of the AC Hotel by Marriott being constructed as part of the Cascades Project, a $158 million mixed-use development in downtown Tallahassee.

USA Today

Tags: $, Awareness, Backlash, Business, Coronavirus, Disease, Employment, Etiquette, Exclusivity, Health, Lifestyle, Parental Burden, Portrait, Punishment, Safety, Social Distancing, Support, Survival, Treatment, Vulnerable

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25-Mar-2020


Mom of 7-month-old with coronavirus speaks out: What parents should know 

 

A mom in South Carolina is sharing a message to other parents after her 7-month-old son was diagnosed with COVID-19, a respiratory illness caused by a novel coronavirus.

Children do not appear to be at higher risk for COVID-19 than adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), but Courtney Doster, a mom of three, wants other parents to know it is possible for their children to get the virus.

Doster's 7-month-old son Emmett tested positive for COVID-19 on March 17. She and her husband, the parents of three children, took their son, their youngest child, to the hospital after his fever spiked to over 104 degrees.

Good Morning America

Tags: Awareness, Children, Coronavirus, Environment, Medical, Parental Burden, Safety, Warning

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23-Mar-2020


The coronavirus did not escape from a lab. Here's how we know. 

 

As the novel coronavirus causing COVID-19 spreads across the globe, with cases surpassing 284,000 worldwide today (March 20), misinformation is spreading almost as fast.

One persistent myth is that this virus, called SARS-CoV-2, was made by scientists and escaped from a lab in Wuhan, China, where the outbreak began.

Here's why: SARS-CoV-2 is very closely related to the virus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), which fanned across the globe nearly 20 years ago. Scientists have studied how SARS-CoV differs from SARS-CoV-2 — with several key letter changes in the genetic code. Yet in computer simulations, the mutations in SARS-CoV-2 don't seem to work very well at helping the virus bind to human cells. If scientists had deliberately engineered this virus, they wouldn't have chosen mutations that computer models suggest won't work. But it turns out, nature is smarter than scientists, and the novel coronavirus found a way to mutate that was better — and completely different— from anything scientists could have created, the study found.

Live Science

Tags: Animals, Awareness, Coronavirus, Discovery, Environment, Perception, Science, Study

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22-Mar-2020


Why You Shouldn't Go To Your Friend's House While Social Distancing 
 

We get it: You’re bored at home this weekend and would love to see your friends or family members that live nearby, especially given how stressed you are in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. You’re just one person, visiting a person or a handful of people you’re close to; how much could it hurt?
A lot, in fact. Health experts urge you: Out of an abundance of caution, stay home.

As more and more cities and states move to establish stay-at-home executive orders ? California, New York ? we’re all looking for potential loopholes for connectivity. We’re grasping for normalcy.

But healthy self-distancing doesn’t just mean avoiding bars and restaurants (not that you can go to them now anyway, sorry); it also means staying home and not visiting seemingly healthy friends at their homes.

Huffpost

Tags: Awareness, Contagion, Coronavirus, Environment, Etiquette, Health, Parental Burden, Policy, Protection, Representation, Respect, Social Distance, Unity

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21-Mar-2020




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