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Health/Food Posts Tagged as 'Awareness'

Welcome to Errattic! We encourage you to customize the type of information you see here by clicking the Preferences link on the top of this page.

 

Losing your hair can be another consequence of the pandemic 

 

Annrene Rowe was getting ready to celebrate her 10th wedding anniversary this summer when she noticed a bald spot on her scalp. In the following days, her thick, shoulder-length hair started falling out in clumps, bunching up in the shower drain.

“I was crying hysterically,” said Rowe, 67, of Anna Maria, Florida.

Rowe, who was hospitalized for 12 days in April with symptoms of the coronavirus, soon found strikingly similar stories in online groups of COVID-19 survivors. Many said that several months after contracting the virus, they began shedding startling amounts of hair.

Doctors say they too are seeing many more patients with hair loss, a phenomenon they believe is indeed related to the coronavirus pandemic, affecting both people who had the virus and those who never became sick.

Losing your hair can be another consequence of the pandemic

Tags: Awareness, Beauty, Coronavirus, Effect, Hair, Health, Medical, Safety

Permalink

24-Sep-2020


What Happens When You Stop Masturbating For A Month 

 

I masturbate almost every day. If I’m bored or feel the urge, I will do it a couple of times a day. I figure if masturbation is so healthy, then I’ll be damned if I’m going to deny myself a dose of healthiness. And yet, while I do masturbate regularly, there have been times in my life when I haven’t. Extended periods of time, to be exact.

Week Two:
Although I never think I'm going to get agitated from sexual frustration, it does happen. During week two, the slightest thing gets on my nerves. I’m also antsy — like I have an itch I need to scratch, but just can’t. In fact, it’s not just that I can’t scratch it, but it also feels like I’m not even sure where that itch is.

While I know what’s causing the agitated itchiness and can recognize how to remedy the “issue,” I still don’t masturbate (because I'm at my parents' house). Then I get angry at myself for not giving into the urge and slipping away somewhere private. Instead, I spend time wondering why I have this hangup, and getting even more annoyed at myself.

Also, I write about sex! I tell myself I should be able to masturbate whenever I need to, and be totally cool with it! Yea, there's a lot of mental chastising going on at this point.

What Happens When You Stop Masturbating For A Month

Tags: Anxiety, Awareness, Bio, Masturbation, Mental Health, Parental Burden, Privacy, Privilege, Survival

Permalink

17-Sep-2020


Texas Board of Education Rejects Lessons About LGBTQ+ Identity 

 

The Texas State Board of Education has given preliminary rejection to a plan to include lessons about sexual orientation and gender identity in the sex education curriculum, but LGBTQ+ advocates are fighting back.

The Republican-majority board last week voted down a proposal by member Ruben Cortez, a Democrat, to teach students in middle school and high school about the difference between sexual orientation and gender identity, ABC News reports. It also rejected a move to start lessons about consent in middle school, as some board members thought the topic inappropriate for students that age. A final vote will come in November.

Texas Board of Education Rejects Lessons About LGBTQ+ Identity

Indian hopes for same-sex marriage dealt crushing blow as top government lawyer claims it ‘cannot be done’

Tags: Awareness, Cancelled, Children, Education, LGBTQ, Marriage, Parental Burden, Policy, Politics, Sex, World

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16-Sep-2020


My OCD Makes Me Anxious About Being Dirty. Here's How I Have Sex 

 

People often throw the phrase "obsessive-compulsive disorder" (OCD) around as jokey shorthand for being excessively particular or high-strung, casting the disorder as a sort of innocuous, yet desexualizing, set of anxieties.

But OCD isn’t a quirk. It's a mental health condition that more than 2 percent of people experience at some point. It takes the random thoughts that flash through people's heads—that irrational fear of having done something wrong, or an unbidden, bizarre fantasy—and, instead of allowing them to quickly fade, forces them to the forefront of their minds in distressing spirals. Because these obsessions don’t respond well to reason, people with OCD develop rituals in an attempt to bring themselves relief from those anxieties. But that relief is fleeting, and people get stuck in this cycle of obsession and ritual. Many become dependent on a growing list of compulsions, which can become their own sources of anxiety and shame.

Obsessions and rituals can bleed directly into sex, as well. People with contamination obsessions often talk about fixating on the perceived dirtiness of genitals or bodily fluids and putting up hard limits on how they have sex. By some estimates, at least one in 10 people with OCD will also at some point develop obsessions about sex, constantly questioning their sexualities or worrying they might be developing harmful urges and building rituals into their relationships, their masturbation habits, their engagement with porn, to test or reassure themselves about their desires. Fears of being misunderstood—or actually dangerous—force some people with sexual obsessions to avoid intimacy altogether. Often, current or potential romantic partners who face the realities of OCD write those with the condition off as just too much.

My OCD Makes Me Anxious About Being Dirty. Here's How I Have Sex

My mother has OCD and has been in a successful, sexual relationship with my stepfather for over 40 years. He isn't OCD but acquired it for mama satisfaction. Extra body scrubs don't hurt if she's worth it. (The cheating bastard.) 14-Sep-2020

Tags: Advice, Awareness, Effect, Mental Health, Priorities, Relationships, Safety, Sex, Vulnerable

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14-Sep-2020


Four in ten think it’s “inappropriate” for 6-year-olds to learn that being gay is OK, study finds 

 

As the new sex and relationships curriculum comes into place across England, Kantar conducted a study into attitudes toward the LGBTQ+ community.

The study asked 2,363 people, aged 16 or over, living in the United Kingdom about their opinions toward LGBTQ+ people being in certain roles.

Although the study found high levels of comfort toward LGBTQ+ people being teachers, 91% in favour for gay men, lesbians and bisexual people and 77% for trans people, it still found that nearly four in ten people (38%) thought it “inappropriate” for a 6-year-old to be taught that being gay is fine.

Four in ten think it’s “inappropriate” for 6-year-olds to learn that being gay is OK, study finds

Tags: Awareness, Children, Choices, Education, Environment, Gay, Inclusion, Lesbian, LGBTQ, Parental Burden, Statistics, Study, Training, Trans

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11-Sep-2020


Why men rape, in their own words: sex offenders in India and what makes it such a dangerous place for women 

 

A study conducted by the Thomson Reuters Foundation in 2018 ranked India as the world’s most dangerous country for women.

The issues examined included sexual violence and trafficking, gender-based social discrimination, lack of access to and control over contraception and childbirth, health care and maternal mortality rates. Mental and physical abuse, religious and cultural facets such as acid attacks, female infanticide, female genital mutilation, and forced and child marriages were also weighed.

Sexual violence against women is an absolute reality in many cultures around the world. In India, however, it is deeply rooted in patriarchal norms and the belief that men are superior to women and that a man should always be a protector of women.

During her interviews, Kaushal found that none of her nine subjects understood the meaning or necessity of consent from a female partner in a sexual relationship or respected them as individuals with their own unique identities. One of them, a serial gang rapist, even refused to accept the idea of rape.

Another subject, a doctor, raped a 12-year-old bedridden patient following an operation, in full awareness of the mental trauma he was causing. The attack left the patient crippled and incapable of talking about the assault for decades out of fear and shock.

Why men rape

Tags: Awareness, Books, Children, Environment, Equality, Freedom, Hostility, Humiliation, Investigation, Laws, Lifestyle, Men In Charge, Psychology, Rape, Safety, Sex, Violence, Woman's Rights, World

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15-Aug-2020


Why Does Coffee Make You Poop? 

 

Starting the day with a cup of coffee may be as much a part of your morning ritual as checking your phone for new texts. The jolt of java delivers an eye-opening boost of caffeine. The warm beverage can lull you slowly from your slumber. Plus, coffee is rich in antioxidants and beneficial chemicals.

But for roughly a third of coffee drinkers, that morning cuppa jump-starts more than just their day — it revs up their stomach, too. For these people, going to the bathroom straight after they've finished their first cup is also part of their routine (and for some, purposefully so). Others may even choose to drink coffee for this very reason.

So why does coffee make you need to poop? And is that good or bad?

Why Does Coffee Make You Poop?

Tags: Awareness, Coffee, Drink, Health, Release, Science, Study

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05-Aug-2020


Why a generation is choosing to be child-free 


 

We are in the middle of a mass extinction, the first caused by a single species. There are 7.8 billion of us, on a planet that scientists estimate can support 1.5 billion humans living as the average US citizen does today. And we know that the biggest contribution any individual living in affluent nations can make is to not have children. According to one study, having one fewer child prevents 58.6 tonnes of carbon emissions every year; compare that with living car-free (2.4 tonnes), avoiding a transatlantic return flight (1.6), or eating a plant-based diet (0.82). Another study said it was almost 20 times more important than any other choice an environmentally minded individual could make. Such claims have been questioned. After all, does a parent really bear the burden of their child’s emissions? Won’t our individual emissions fall as technologies and lifestyles change? Isn’t measuring our individual carbon footprint – a concept popularised by oil and gas multinational BP – giving a free pass to the handful of corporate powers responsible for almost all carbon emissions? The only thing that isn’t up for debate is that we all know that we are living in ways that can’t continue.

Coronavirus isn’t likely to give us coronababies – but a pandemic isn’t the reason that having children has shifted from an inevitability to a choice, and now, a moral question. A long time ago, “Do we have children?” became “Should we?”

The Guardian

Florida now has more coronavirus cases than New York and California leads the nation

My Kids Want to Opt Out of In-Person Instruction This Fall

Palm Springs boy, 7, in coma with ‘hole in skull’ after cruel neighbor randomly hurls a rock at him

‘Monster’ gets 70 years for repeatedly abusing Buffalo woman, son

Tags: Action, Advice, Arrest, Attack, Awareness, Books, Children, Choices, Contamination, Coronavirus, Crime, Death, Education, Environment, Etiquette, Exclusivity, Future, Health, Illness, Injury, Investment, Lifestyle, Lockdown, Mental Health, Parental Burden, Parental Crime, Politics, Population Control, Preference, Pregnancy, Priorities, Sacrifice, Safety, Saving The Environment!, Science, Statistics, Survival, Women In Charge, World

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25-Jul-2020


7 Consequences of Blaming Others for How We Manage Anger 

 

“If she didn’t say that I wouldn’t have hit her.” “If he didn’t cut me off I would never have chased after him!” “My father is to blame for my problems with anger.”

These are just a few examples of comments I’ve heard over the years, made by individuals who blamed others in order to justify their anger and how they expressed it. In the first, a 32-year-old husband, married for just two years, assaulted his wife while under the influence of alcohol. He hit his wife after she threatened to divorce him and make sure that he would suffer financially. His aggression was a reaction to his anger—rage that masked his feelings of powerlessness, hurt, and anticipated loss. In spite of arguments that had escalated in the previous year, he was unable to honestly acknowledge that he and his wife were incompatible.

In each scenario, these individuals deny their responsibility for their behavior. They portray themselves as powerless in their actions and, often, incapable of change. The details of how they blamed others for their anger is different. However, in each situation, these individuals failed to recognize that their tendency to blame others only strengthened their perceived powerlessness and–in turn– their likelihood of blaming others.

It is one thing to suggest that an event contributed to triggering our anger. It is an entirely different issue to suggest that others are responsible for our feelings, their intensity and how we manage them.

Steps to Reduce Your Tendency to Blame Others

1. Recognize it when it occurs.

2. Reflect on the purpose it serves you. What feelings are you trying to avoid?

3. Cultivate increased self-compassion to recognize that being human involves making mistakes, having flaws and weaknesses.

4 Recognize how your tendency for global thinking contributes to blaming.

5. Look for your contribution to your suffering.

Psychology Today

Tags: Advice, Americans, Awareness, Environment, Etiquette, Politics, Psychology, Survival, Winning

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23-Jul-2020


6 Things White Kids Say About Race That Parents Should Call Out Now 

 

White parents often avoid talking openly about race with white children because of the unfounded fear that it will call attention to differences that kids wouldn’t otherwise notice. Some insist their kids are just too young for such conversations.

If parents don’t explain why these inequities exist — that they exist because of longstanding systemic racism in this country — children will assume they must be justified or “natural.”

We asked experts to share some of the problematic things white kids commonly say and how parents can respond in order to further the conversation and create a teachable moment.

Huffpost

Illinois School Board Member Resigns After Calling Black People 'Animals'

Tags: Awareness, Complaint, Education, Employment, Etiquette, Lifestyle, Neglect, New World Order, Parental Burden, Parental Laziness, Responsibility, Termination, Training, Unruly Child, Words

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17-Jul-2020


Teenager draws praise after calling out parents over ‘disrespectful’ household rules: ‘Can anyone relate?’ 

 

A teenager is earning plenty of praise after creating clips criticizing the seemingly contradictory ways some parents enforce household rules.

The clips, shared on TikTok by a user named Myah Elliott, are part of a series she calls “Things Parents Need To Understand.” In her videos, the 19-year-old shares her experience navigating common clashes kids have with their parents — ranging from bedroom privacy and curfews to eating your vegetables.

One particularly popular video, which has earned more than 650,000 views, features Elliott complaining about her parents’ apparently hypocritical stance on household chores.

Yahoo

Tags: Awareness, Children, Etiquette, Parental Burden, Video, Women In Charge, Youth

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09-Jul-2020


How Tracy Sherrod Came to Lead America’s Oldest Black Publishing Imprint 

 

Lauren Michele Jackson recently wrote a piece for Vulture, looking at lists of Black texts that pop up whenever there’s a galvanizing incident of racial violence. A lot of the magazines and websites will publish a list like, here’s what to read to think about race. Jackson wrote. “Aside from the contemporary teaching texts, genre appears indiscriminately: essays slide against memoir and folklore, poetry squeezed on either side by sociological tomes. This, maybe ironically but maybe not, reinforces an already pernicious literary divide that books written by or about minorities are for educational purposes, racism and homophobia and stuff, wholly segregated from matters of form and grammar, lyric and scene.” I’d really like to hear your perspective on this, because you publish books about race, but you publish books about everything. Do you think readers should be looking at books as curative or as medicine for toxicity and racism in this culture?

Slate

Tags: Awareness, Books, Celebration, Choices, Education, Entertainment, History, Politics, Racism, Representation, Respect, Writing

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06-Jul-2020


Planting Trees Won’t Stop Climate Change 

 

Not only are planted trees not the carbon sinks you want, but tree planting frequently ends up doing more harm than good.

Humans have long believed that planting trees, any kind of tree, anywhere, is good, something Mother Nature cries out for, something that might even solve our climate crisis. Tree-planting initiatives proliferate: the Bonn Challenge, Trees for the Future, Trees Forever, the 10 Billion Tree Tsunami, Plant a Billion Trees, 8 Billion Trees, the Trillion Tree Campaign, the One Trillion Trees Initiative, to mention just a few.

But such slapdash planting is an American tradition. In 1876, possibly inspired by Arbor Day, a man named Ellwood Cooper sought to improve his 2,000-acre, mostly treeless ranch near Santa Barbara, California, with 50,000 eucalyptus seedlings. They shot up 40 feet in just three years, an unheard-of growth rate for which they became known as “miracle trees.” Eucalyptus trees are not native to California.

Shortly thereafter, the University of California and the state Department of Forestry distributed free eucs for everyone to plant. Prairies, chaparral, and cutover forestland were jammed full of these aliens. One hundred years after the first Arbor Day, 271,800 acres of eucalyptus had been planted in the U.S., 197,700 of them in California.

When I inserted my arm into euc leaf and bark litter in Bolinas, California, I couldn’t touch the bottom. That’s because the microbes and insects that eat it are in Australia, not California. Native plant communities can’t survive in these plantations because eucs kill competition with their own herbicide, creating what botanists call “eucalyptus desolation.” Eucs evolved with fire and prosper from it. Their tops don’t just burn; they explode. Living near them is like living beside a gasoline refinery staffed by chain smokers.

But eucs remain popular in California. They’re still being planted. And agencies seeking to protect the public and recover native ecosystems by razing eucs inevitably face the fury of eucalyptus lovers who have, for example, accused them of being “plant Nazis.”

Slate

Tags: Awareness, Contamination, Environment, Etiquette, Nature, Science, Terraforming, Trees

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25-May-2020


Glennon Doyle thinks our kids suck. And it’s all our fault. 

 

New York Times bestselling author Glennon Doyle is unequivocal in her opinion on modern parenting.

In her new book Untamed, she describes how parents receive a ‘terrible memo’ from society as soon as our kids are born.

This memo says that our kids are our saviours and parenting them is akin to a religion. We must give them every opportunity possible and most importantly, we must never allow anything difficult to happen to them.

According to Glennon, not only does this disastrous memo make us parents feel exhausted, neurotic and guilty; but it is also the reason why our kids suck.

Ouch.

The reason our kids suck, she says, is because we no longer allow our children to learn how to lose, or to struggle, or to be rejected.

MamaMia

Tags: Advice, Awareness, Books, Family, Parental Crime, Parental Laziness, Psychology, Responsibility, Social Media, Training, Treatment, Unruly Child

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20-May-2020


New syndrome in kids could change fate of schools reopening in fall, Cuomo says 

 

The growing number of New York children diagnosed with a serious inflammatory syndrome possibly connected to COVID-19 may impact whether schools reopen in the fall, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Sunday.

Health officials are investigating more than 120 cases of pediatric multi-system inflammatory syndrome in New York, according to the governor.

“This is a syndrome that we are only just discovering,” Cuomo said. “I think the numbers are going to be much, much higher.”

The illness, which causes the inflammation of blood vessels, has been identified in children across 16 states and at least five countries, according to Cuomo. At least three children have died in New York, health officials have said.

Symptoms of PMIS include a persistent fever, rash, abdominal pain and vomiting. Parents should call their pediatrician immediately if their children exhibit symptoms.

Pix11

Doctors raise hopes of blood test for children with coronavirus-linked syndrome

Tags: Awareness, Children, Contagion, Coronavirus, Death, Discovery, Education, Environment, Fear, Health, Illness, Medical, Parental Burden, Responsibility, Statistics, Study, Threat, World

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17-May-2020




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