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Latino civil rights organization drops 'Latinx' from official communication 

 

"Let's stop using Latinx in all official communications," García said, adding that it's "very unliked" by almost all Latinos.

Latino civil rights organization drops 'Latinx'

'I have a right to protect my property'

Boy, 14, shoots would-be robber in face as culprit was strangling his mother

Armie Hammer is 'out of treatment'

I'll admit, I did sleep with students

Hispanic figures reportedly push back on use of 'Latinx'

Tags: Bad Daddy, Ban, Bullying, Celebration, Cultural, Death, Fighting Back, Latinos, Mental Health, Policy, Politics, Safety, Sex, Theft, Threat, Treatment, Violence, Words

Permalink

04-Jan-2022


Just 4% of Hispanic or Latino people prefer the term 'Latinx 

 

The findings from Gallup are consistent with another survey by the Pew Research Center from 2020, where researchers found that only one in four Hispanic or Latino adults had even heard of the term "Latinx." Only 3% of them used it to describe themselves.

Just 4% of Hispanic or Latino people prefer the term 'Latinx

Twitter users pounce on LA Times opinion columnist for using the term 'Latinxs'

Can We Stop Pretending That Anybody Talks This Way?

Call 'Latinx' What It Is: Lexical Imperialism

Tags: All Rights, Celebration, Community, Cultural, Fail, Hate, Humiliation, Hypocrisy, Interference, Language, Latinos, Preference, Pride, Priorities, Privacy, Respect, Tradition, Treatment, Unity

Permalink

08-Dec-2021


J BALVIN Apologizes for 'Perra' (Dog) Vid 
 

The Colombian reggaetón star took to IG to apologize for the controversial visual offering of his track "Perra" with Dominican rapper, Tokischa, who's of African descent herself. The track's all about how she (Tokischa) is a dog in heat ... and looking for a male to bang.

J BALVIN Apologizes for 'Perra' Vid

Drag artist faces thunderous backlash over ‘disgusting af’

Netflix drops ‘hurtful and derogatory’ Latina housekeeper role

Tags: Art, Backlash, Celebrity, Choices, Cultural, Drag, Latinos, LGBTQ, Music, Nagging, Opinion, Representation, Termination, Video

Permalink

12-Nov-2021


‘I Love Lucy’: Only Lucy was Allowed to Poke Fun at Ricky’s Accent, Here’s Why 

 

Cuban immigrant, Desi Arnaz moved to America in 1934. After arriving in the US, Arnaz would create one of the most successful production companies in Hollywood, known as Desilu Productions, alongside his on and off-camera wife, Lucille Ball.

Despite becoming quite a successful businessman and actor in showbusiness, he could never escape his Cuban accent. Arnaz had issues with anyone who poked fun at him about it, even though fans found it cute. Arnaz harbored resentment to anyone who made fun of his accent while on the set— except for one person.

‘I Love Lucy’: Only Lucy was Allowed to Poke Fun at Ricky’s Accent, Here’s Why

Tags: Business, Celebrity, Comedy, Cultural, Daddy Squish, Entertainment, Etiquette, Hollywood, Latinos, Legend, Marriage, Men In Charge, Portrait, Respect, TV, TV Trivia

Permalink

06-Mar-2021


DIRECTOR EDWARD JAMES OLMOS WANTED EQUAL NUDITY AND FLAMING STUNTMEN ON BATTLESTAR GALACTICA'S 'THE PLAN' 

 

Bonus! We have one more special episode of the Battlestar Galacticast podcast, and co-hosts Marc Bernardin and Tricia Helfer (Number Six) appropriately talk about BSG's final TV movie, The Plan, with the film's writer and producer, Jane Espenson.

Edward James Olmos (aka Admiral Adama) directed the companion film to the series (note to newbies: The Plan is not the best place to start your BSG watching experience), which follows the path of two Cavils (Dean Stockwell) in the lead-up and aftermath of the initial Cylon attack on humanity. For BSG fans, the TV film is a walk down memory lane, a chance to revisit favorite scenes from the mini-series and the first and second seasons, albeit from a Cylon point-of-view.

Even though the content was dark, Espenson also shares that Olmos had an enthusiastic appreciation for the material. “Eddie really loved pain and darkness. He was like, ‘Life is pain and hard.’ As bright a light as Eddie is, there was something he loved about trying to capture genuine darkness on film. I wrote a line for him [when he played Adama] that referenced going off to the bathroom to take a crap, and it was his favorite thing, because he was like, ‘People do! It’s real!’”

DIRECTOR EDWARD JAMES OLMOS WANTED EQUAL NUDITY AND FLAMING STUNTMEN ON BATTLESTAR GALACTICA'S 'THE PLAN'

Tags: Celebrity, Comeback, Daddy Squish, Empathy, Employment, Equality, Etiquette, History, Latinos, Portrait, Tribute, TV, TV Trivia

Permalink

16-Dec-2020


Please don’t call me Latinx: Why it’s not my preferred term
 

Ever since I emigrated to the U.S. from El Salvador, I’ve used the term Hispanic to describe my heritage. But lately, I’ve been corrected on multiple occasions about the term I use to describe myself — told that I should use the more accepted term, Latinx.

Okay, so I understand where Latinx comes from — the desire for a gender-inclusive term for people of Latin American heritage, avoiding the gendered ending of Latino or Latina. But it doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue. And besides, why Latinx and not Latin American?

At the heart of this debate lies the issue of labeling, where an outside group (or a small percentage from an inside group) decides on a term, or label, and then dictates which people fit under the larger umbrella of this label. This happens all the time, and the shadow this umbrella casts is hardly constant: its edges waver, growing and shrinking as categories shift.

I have friends who have lived in this country for decades but still refer to themselves as Mexican. I have other friends who call themselves Hispanic, or Chicana/o or just American. Should I correct all of these friends and tell them their descriptors are dated, that they are now Latinx and need to start referring to themselves as Latinx?

Please don’t call me Latinx: Why it’s not my preferred term

Tags: All Rights, Complaint, Deletion, Etiquette, Exclusivity, Latinos, Representation, Respect, Tradition, Treatment

Permalink

31-Oct-2020


Why some Latino essential workers remain overlooked amid racial reckoning protests 

 

The vast majority of Latinos living in the U.S. (around 60.6 million) are not undocumented, but 15.7% lived in poverty in 2019, a number that had been falling, but is still more than double their white counterparts, according to Census data.

Latinos also make up a large portion of the labor force in service sectors that were considered essential after the COVID-19 pandemic started (some 65%) -- like some construction, health care and food service workers -- leaving them at higher risk of being exposed to the disease without the protections typically afforded first responders and other traditional essential workers.

"Why are Latinos dying at a higher rate? Because we have no choice," said Frankie Miranda, the president of the Hispanic Federation, which supports Latino-led non-profits around the country. "We have to go to work, stock the shelves, deliver the food, be the sanitation workers, and of course we don't have the protective gear or any kind of information that can help us really navigate this. We know this for sure because our member agencies -- that were already underfunded and under-resourced -- were the ones that needed to step in and be the first responders for our communities."

When asked why he believes the Mexican community has not jumped into action and demanded racial equality following the Black Lives Matter protests, Alvarez suggested: "We are too afraid. Even if you want to do a peaceful protest, you don't want to be arrested because you can get deported."

Alvarez's case points to another situation that many Latinos say is affecting the community: lack of unity.

Why some Latino essential workers remain overlooked amid racial reckoning protests

Tags: All Rights, Cultural, Environment, Etiquette, Exclusivity, Hate, Health, History, Hostility, Humiliation, Inhumanity, Judgment, Latinos, Lifestyle, Mental Health, Neglect, Opinion, Politics, Protection, Racism, Safety, Treatment, Vulnerable

Permalink

11-Oct-2020


'Latinx' Is Gaining Popularity. But New Research Says Only 3% of U.S. Hispanics Use the Gender-Neutral Term 

 

Latinx has been increasingly used by politicians, mainstream media and universities. But new research suggests the majority of people who Latinx is meant to describe have never even heard of the term.

A new study by the Pew Research Center found that only 23% of people in the U.S. who self identify as Hispanic or Latino have heard of the term Latinx. An even smaller percentage—only 3%—describe themselves as Latinx, a gender-neutral and inclusive alternative to Latino or Hispanic, particularly for people who identify as LGBTQ+.

Pew surveyed 3,030 U.S. Hispanic adults in December 2019. It is the first time the research center has asked about Latinx in particular, and the new research shows that though Latinx by far isn’t as frequently used as a way to identify in the U.S., it has grown in popularity.

New Research

I don't use it because it sounds stupid and experimental. 13-Aug-2020

Tags: Choices, Cultural, Etiquette, History, Latinos, Representation, Words

Permalink

13-Aug-2020